/
/
/
Page 5
Last updated January 16 2021 at 10:30 AM

12,569 Apartments for rent in Chicago, IL - p. 5

📍
Lincoln Park
Lakeview
South Loop
Near North Side
South Shore
See all neighborhoods
Check out 12,569 verified apartments for rent in Chicago, IL with rents starting as low as $550. Some apartments for rent in Chicago might offer rent specials. Look out for the
$
rent special icon!
Verified
7 Units Available
5500 S. Cornell Avenue
5493 S Cornell Ave
Chicago, IL | East Hyde Park
Studio
$925
295 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$1,425
702 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Converted elegant hotel with 1920s character, parking, on-site laundry and bike storage. Residents enjoy units with walk in closets, hardwood floors and laundry. Located in Hyde Park, close to public transportation.
Verified
1 Unit Available
Drexel Terrace
5043 S Drexel Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
1 Bedroom
$1,050
508 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Fully furnished homes with extra storage and granite counters. Parking available on site. Online portal for resident payment convenience. Near the University of Chicago. Easy access to I-90 and I-94.
Verified
2 Units Available
5202-5210 S. Cornell Avenue
5202 S Cornell Ave
Chicago, IL | East Hyde Park
Studio
$975
498 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
One-bedroom apartments a few blocks from Lake Michigan. Recently renovated with hardwood floors and air conditioning. Courtyard and bike storage. Walking distance to the restaurants on 53rd Street.
Verified
3 Units Available
4455 S. Greenwood Avenue
4455 S Greenwood Ave
Chicago, IL | North Kenwood
Studio
$961
458 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Pet-friendly Bronzeville apartments with 24-hour maintenance, walk-in closets, free Wi-Fi. Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau details add character. Hardwood flooring, plenty of natural light. Near parks and schools. Close to Lake Shore Drive.
Verified
4 Units Available
5415 S. Woodlawn Avenue
5415 S Woodlawn Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
Studio
$1,035
413 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,250
651 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
A short walk from Nichols Park and E 55th Street. Presentable apartments with kitchen appliances, hardwood floors and garbage disposal. Community includes parking, a courtyard and 24-hour maintenance.
Verified
2 Units Available
1440 E. 52nd Street
1440-1450 E 52nd St
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,265
636 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Charming homes that have been recently updated. Community includes a courtyard, bike storage and laundry center. Online portal for resident payment convenience. Near Harold Washington Park. Right by Lake Shore Drive.
Verified
2 Units Available
5320-5326.5 S. Drexel Boulevard
5229 S Drexel Blvd
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
1 Bedroom
$1,350
574 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,570
643 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Located just steps from schools and Jessie Ma Houston Park. Residents enjoy units with granite countertops, patio or balcony, and hardwood floors. Luxury community features bike storage, parking, on-site laundry and 24-hour maintenance.
Verified
6 Units Available
5300-5308 S. Hyde Park Boulevard
5300 S Hyde Park Blvd
Chicago, IL | East Hyde Park
Studio
$930
450 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$1,450
947 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Bright Hyde Park units near Lake Michigan. Hardwood floors and natural light. Large bay windows. Recently renovated. Community bike storage available to all tenants. 24-hour maintenance.
Verified
2 Units Available
5222-38 S. Drexel Avenue
5222 S Drexel Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$1,475
965 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,995
1349 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Two-bedroom apartments in Hyde Park are recently renovated with modern kitchens, granite counters, hardwood floors, on-site laundry. Pet-friendly building with bike storage, clubhouse, courtyard, gym. Near University of Chicago, public transit, I-90/94, Washington Park.
Verified
1 Unit Available
5350-5358 S. Maryland Avenue
5350-5358 S Maryland Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
2 Bedrooms
$1,525
902 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Located near Washington Park and bus stops along South Cottage Grove Avenue, this property offers a pet-friendly atmosphere with amenities such as on-site laundry. Units have been recently renovated and feature hardwood flooring.
Verified
1 Unit Available
5524-5526 S. Everett Avenue
5524 S Everett Ave
Chicago, IL | East Hyde Park
3 Bedrooms
$2,900
1550 sqft
4 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Conveniently located close to Lake Michigan and public transportation. Residents have access to communal laundry, 24-hour maintenance and bike storage. Units feature bathtubs, ceiling fans, fireplaces and hardwood floors.
Verified
3 Units Available
5528-5532 S. Everett Avenue
5528 S Everett Ave
Chicago, IL | East Hyde Park
Studio
$875
284 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,250
559 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Lakeshore living just steps from the water. Lake Michigan access and great transportation place you in the heart of it all. Pet-friendly with on-site laundry and recently updated interiors featuring hardwood floors and granite counters.
Verified
1 Unit Available
4859 S. Champlain Avenue
4851-59 S Champlain Ave
Chicago, IL | Grand Boulevard
2 Bedrooms
$1,415
1164 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
These recently renovated apartments are just blocks from numerous shopping and dining venues along 53rd Street and just over 7 miles from downtown Chicago. Units include oversized windows, walk-in closets and beautiful hardwood floors.
Verified
2 Units Available
5049 S. Drexel Boulevard
5101 S Drexel Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,195
580 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Brick-faced apartment building with early 20th-century craftsmanship. Recently renovated apartments have a fireplace, granite counters and hardwood floors. Some on-site parking, a community gym and on-site laundry. Borders Washington Park, with local schools close by.
Verified
1 Unit Available
5700 S. Blackstone Avenue
5700 S Blackstone Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
4 Bedrooms
$4,600
2265 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Apartments located only steps from 57th street and within walking distance of shops and restaurants. Recently renovated, apartments feature balconies, bay windows and hardwood floors. There is internet access and on-site laundry. Pets are welcome.
Verified
2 Units Available
5325 S. Hyde Park Boulevard
5325 S Hyde Park Blvd
Chicago, IL | East Hyde Park
1 Bedroom
$1,424
855 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,725
1350 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
This recently renovated property is just blocks from the University of Chicago, Lake Michigan, Promontory Point and the Museum of Science and Industry. Units include sunrooms and hardwood floors. Residents have access to on-site gym.
Verified
2 Units Available
5535 S Kimbark
5535 S Kimbark Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
1 Bedroom
$1,500
588 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Apartment amenities include hardwood floors and radiant heat. Laundry center on site. Conveniently located just minutes from restaurants, retail, the University of Chicago, and public transportation. Pet friendly. Near Nichols Park.
Verified
1 Unit Available
5715-5725 S. Kimbark Avenue
5715 S Kimbark Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
2 Bedrooms
Ask
3 Bedrooms
$3,600
1450 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Exposed brick and cozy courtyards fill your new apartment community, complete with on-site laundry and internet access. Interiors are bright and spacious with hardwood floors, fireplace and relaxing bathtub.
Verified
1 Unit Available
1358 E. 58th Street
1358 E 58th St
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
1 Bedroom
Ask
4 Bedrooms
$4,000
1970 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Charming Hyde Park apartments in Greek Revival building. Hardwood floors and fireplaces. In-unit laundry. Private balconies overlooking Hyde Park. Building has bike storage and 24-hour maintenance.
Verified
1 Unit Available
5053 S. Ellis Avenue
5053 S Ellis Ave
Chicago, IL | Hyde Park Kenwood Historic District
1 Bedroom
$1,350
750 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 10:30 AM
Community includes Internet access, parking and on-site laundry. Units feature dishwashers, garbage disposals and patios or balconies. Located close to Madison Park, Drexel Square and Jessie Ma Houston Park.
$
Verified
15 Units Available
Times Square Apartments
869 West Buena Avenue
Chicago, IL | Far North Side
Studio
$808
315 sqft
1 Bedroom
$918
446 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,397
750 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 04:45 AM
Experience the convenience of apartment living in the Buena Park/Lakeview neighborhood. Times Square Apartments is a short walk to the lakefront and the bus to downtown is outside your front door.
Verified
1 Unit Available
3601 w 53rd ST
3601 W 53rd St
Chicago, IL | West Elsdon
3 Bedrooms
$1,825
2200 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 04:46 AM
This property is only minutes from the Super Mall and other retail outlets. Surface and garage parking are available. Units feature granite countertops and fireplaces.
Verified
1 Unit Available
7941 S Marquette
7941 S Marquette Ave
Chicago, IL | South Chicago
Studio
$615
375 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
Last updated January 16 at 04:46 AM
Studio and 1-bedroom units in a newly renovated building. Units include quality appliances, on-site laundry, hardwood floors, free wireless internet, and security cameras. Conveniently located minutes from public transit. Near Rainbow Beach Park.
Verified
16 Units Available
Sheridan Lake Apartments
6401 N Sheridan Rd
Chicago, IL | Loyola
Studio
$910
500 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,079
640 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,406
1050 sqft
Last updated January 16 at 04:45 AM
Welcome to the Sheridan Lake Apartments! These two beautifully maintained buildings are conveniently located in Rogers Park, next door to Loyola University’s incredible Lakeshore Campus.

Median Rent in Chicago

Last updated Dec. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Chicago is $1,093, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,205.
Studio
$991
1 Bed
$1,093
2 Beds
$1,205
3+ Beds
$1,331
Find More Rentals By

Bedrooms

Chicago 1 Bedroom Apartments

Bedrooms

Find More Rentals in Nearby

Find an apartment for rent in Chicago, IL


Searching for an apartment for rent in Chicago, IL? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 12,569 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Chicago. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in Chicago is $991 for a studio, $1,093 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $1,205 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Chicago apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Chicago, IL apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Chicago?
In Chicago, the median rent is $991 for a studio, $1,093 for a 1-bedroom, $1,205 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,331 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Chicago, check out our monthly Chicago Rent Report.
How much is rent in Chicago?
In Chicago, the median rent is $991 for a studio, $1,093 for a 1-bedroom, $1,205 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,331 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Chicago, check out our monthly Chicago Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Chicago?
You can filter cheap apartments in Chicago by price: under $1,100, under $1,000, under $900, under $800, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Chicago?
You can filter cheap apartments in Chicago by price: under $1,100, under $1,000, under $900, under $800, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Chicago?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Chicago apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Chicago?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Chicago apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Chicago properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Chicago properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Chicago?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Chicago.
How much should I pay for rent in Chicago?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Chicago.
How can I find off-campus housing in Chicago?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Chicago. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include The Chicago School of Professional Psychology at Chicago, City Colleges of Chicago-Harry S Truman College, City Colleges of Chicago-Harold Washington College, Moody Bible Institute, and Saint Augustine College.
How can I find off-campus housing in Chicago?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Chicago. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include The Chicago School of Professional Psychology at Chicago, City Colleges of Chicago-Harry S Truman College, City Colleges of Chicago-Harold Washington College, Moody Bible Institute, and Saint Augustine College.

Median Rent in Chicago

Last updated Dec. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Chicago is $1,093, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,205.
Studio
$991
1 Bed
$1,093
2 Beds
$1,205
3+ Beds
$1,331

City Guide

Chicago
"Maybe we can show government how to operate better as a result of better architecture. Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world." (Frank Lloyd Wright)
"Maybe we can show government how to operate better as a result of better architecture. Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world." (Frank Lloyd Wright)

Ah, Chicago, metropolis of the Midwest! Being the third largest city in the United States, Chicago is a major nerve center for business, culture, and entertainment. Though it’s no longer just a rest stop between the east and west coasts, the Big Onion still has a whole world to offer. From urban skyscrapers and honking taxis along Lakeshore Drive, to tree-lined streets and grassy parks, there is a niche for every taste. With almost 4 million people calling the windy city their home, though, finding your own place in the chaos can seem like a daunting task.

Having trouble with Craigslist Chicago? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

The world was first introduced to the Ferris Wheel at the 1983 World Fair in Chicago. The construction astounded the public, and has been replicated consistently all over the world for well over a century. This Ferris Wheel at Chicago's Navy Pier can seat up to 240 people.

Wrigley Field has been home to the Chicago Cubs since 1916, and in that time has hosted everything from skiing events to Chicago's football team to circus elephants! While the Cubs might not be the nation's most promising baseball teams, their fans are undoubtedly loyal and their hot dogs are worth the trip alone.

Chicago is an architecture lover's dream - and with the Buckingham Fountain in the middle of Chicago's legendary Grant Park, why wouldn't it be? This gem of a landmark was designed after one of the fountains at Versailles Palace, and is one the largest fountains in the world!

Basic Tips on Chicago Living

Everyone knows you don’t put ketchup on a Chicago-style hot dog, and everyone knows that trying to travel through Wrigleyville during a Cubs game will be a mob scene. Here are a few other bits of city-specific advice for fledgling Chicagoans. Though renting stand-alone houses is definitely not unheard of here, the most common living arrangements are apartments and condominiums, the latter of which are sometimes rented out privately by their owners. The range of styles, ages and quality amongst them, however, varies depending on where you’re looking and how much you’re willing to spend. Knowing this, how on earth do you even get started?

Basic Tips on Chicago Living
+

Everyone knows you don’t put ketchup on a Chicago-style hot dog, and everyone knows that trying to travel through Wrigleyville during a Cubs game will be a mob scene. Here are a few other bits of city-specific advice for fledgling Chicagoans. Though renting stand-alone houses is definitely not unheard of here, the most common living arrangements are apartments and condominiums, the latter of which are sometimes rented out privately by their owners. The range of styles, ages and quality amongst them, however, varies depending on where you’re looking and how much you’re willing to spend. Knowing this, how on earth do you even get started?

How to Find an Apartment

It’s always best to know what you want in an apartment first. What’s important to you? What’s your price range? Are you willing to sacrifice size for location? Do you want a vintage flat, a hole-in-the-wall studio, or an updated 40th floor pad with a panoramic view of Lake Michigan? One great thing about apartment hunting in Chicago is that there are multiple services that will take down all your criteria, and then drive you around the city to see multiple options, free of charge. Of course, there are always Internet listings, newspaper ads, and for many areas, a simple walk through the neighborhood to glimpse “for rent” signs will suffice.

Chicago really has no defined “rental season”. Apartments are available year-round, though if anything, there are more options and they tend to go quicker and rent higher in the spring and fall. During these seasons, you’re more likely to lose a good dwelling to another contender if you don’t act fast. Renting a place out in the middle of January may give you a price or time advantage, but moving a couch up to the fourth floor of a walk-up building when the back staircase is covered in ice may also cause you to think twice.

How to Find an Apartment
+

It’s always best to know what you want in an apartment first. What’s important to you? What’s your price range? Are you willing to sacrifice size for location? Do you want a vintage flat, a hole-in-the-wall studio, or an updated 40th floor pad with a panoramic view of Lake Michigan? One great thing about apartment hunting in Chicago is that there are multiple services that will take down all your criteria, and then drive you around the city to see multiple options, free of charge. Of course, there are always Internet listings, newspaper ads, and for many areas, a simple walk through the neighborhood to glimpse “for rent” signs will suffice.

Chicago really has no defined “rental season”. Apartments are available year-round, though if anything, there are more options and they tend to go quicker and rent higher in the spring and fall. During these seasons, you’re more likely to lose a good dwelling to another contender if you don’t act fast. Renting a place out in the middle of January may give you a price or time advantage, but moving a couch up to the fourth floor of a walk-up building when the back staircase is covered in ice may also cause you to think twice.

What to Expect From A Chicago Pad

Quality and Style: As previously stated, Chicago has every type of dwelling imaginable, though different neighborhoods and price ranges will yield different results. Multi-unit high-rise buildings usually have amenities included, such as a concierge/doorman, a communal rooftop deck, a pool, or a fitness center. These types of buildings will also have more restrictions or fees for moving in and out. Older buildings with radiator heat will often have gas and heat included in the rent, which is a huge advantage in the winter months when heating prices can break $150 - $200 or more a month. Also, you’d be hard-pressed to find an apartment in the city of Chicago that requires you to pay your own water bill.

Common Logistics: A 12-month lease is standard, though occasionally a larger company will throw in financial perks for signing a longer lease. Short-term or month-to-month leases are hard to come by unless you’re subletting or renting from a private landlord. As far as security deposits go, the standard is equivalent to one month’s rent. More and more often, though, management companies are requiring a non-refundable move-in fee (usually between $150 and $300 per person) instead of a security deposit.

Your Renting Arsenal: Here is a list of common things that will be required for a rental application:

  • Photo ID for all applicants
  • It’s perfectly normal (especially with management companies) to require a $25 - $50 non-refundable credit/background check fee per applicant.
  • Expect to provide information on an application including (but not limited to) current employer information, financial information, previous landlord contact information, and personal or professional references.
  • Many larger management companies will require previous bank statements or pay stubs as proof of income
What to Expect From A Chicago Pad
+

Quality and Style: As previously stated, Chicago has every type of dwelling imaginable, though different neighborhoods and price ranges will yield different results. Multi-unit high-rise buildings usually have amenities included, such as a concierge/doorman, a communal rooftop deck, a pool, or a fitness center. These types of buildings will also have more restrictions or fees for moving in and out. Older buildings with radiator heat will often have gas and heat included in the rent, which is a huge advantage in the winter months when heating prices can break $150 - $200 or more a month. Also, you’d be hard-pressed to find an apartment in the city of Chicago that requires you to pay your own water bill.

Common Logistics: A 12-month lease is standard, though occasionally a larger company will throw in financial perks for signing a longer lease. Short-term or month-to-month leases are hard to come by unless you’re subletting or renting from a private landlord. As far as security deposits go, the standard is equivalent to one month’s rent. More and more often, though, management companies are requiring a non-refundable move-in fee (usually between $150 and $300 per person) instead of a security deposit.

Your Renting Arsenal: Here is a list of common things that will be required for a rental application:

  • Photo ID for all applicants
  • It’s perfectly normal (especially with management companies) to require a $25 - $50 non-refundable credit/background check fee per applicant.
  • Expect to provide information on an application including (but not limited to) current employer information, financial information, previous landlord contact information, and personal or professional references.
  • Many larger management companies will require previous bank statements or pay stubs as proof of income
Chicago Neighborhoods

Within the city of Chicago, there are over 200 unique neighborhoods that are fluid and socially constructed, each with their own quirks and day-to-day life. On a much larger (and more general) scale, the city can be broken up into four massive sections. Consider this a “jumping off” point in finding your ‘hood. Once you decide which side of the city is best for you, look into doing some research on that area’s neighborhoods to find the best fit. A semi-official map of Chicago’s neighborhoods can be found here.

The Loop: The central hub of Chicago, dubbed “the loop” due to the circular path that the elevated trains take around it, is mainly considered a commercial area. It boasts the quintessential Chicago landmarks, including skyscrapers, museums, Grant and Millennium Parks, a theatre district, and a large shopping district. Housing in the loop tends to be sparser and located more toward the perimeter. This area is bustling during the day. Living spaces are compact high-rise condominium and apartment buildings. Generally, the further your living proximity from the loop, the lower cost, more spacious, and more “residential” your apartment will tend to be.

North side: Closer to the loop and Michigan Avenue’s “Magnificent Mile” shopping district. There are many town houses around these neighborhoods, too. As you continue north, rent drops a little and the streets become tree-lined, yet population rises considerably. The north side, as a whole, is the most densely populated section of the city, especially along the lakefront. This area has a lot of neighborhood amenities, parks, and nightlife. It boasts a pretty even number of two and three-flat buildings, vintage courtyard buildings, and high-rises of all different types, with pockets of single-family homes woven in.

South side: The south side covers a much larger land area. Some parts of the south side are quaint, residential communities, and some are rather old and historic.The neighborhoods here have more single-family homes and smaller buildings. Millions of Chicagoans still call it home.

West side: Just west of the loop has historically been an industrial zone; the famous Chicago Union Stockyards were once located here. Closer to downtown, you’ll find loft-style condominiums and old warehouses converted into restaurants and galleries, as well as one of the largest medical districts in the United States. Further out, more stand-alone houses, town homes and bungalows appear.

Chicago Neighborhoods
+

Within the city of Chicago, there are over 200 unique neighborhoods that are fluid and socially constructed, each with their own quirks and day-to-day life. On a much larger (and more general) scale, the city can be broken up into four massive sections. Consider this a “jumping off” point in finding your ‘hood. Once you decide which side of the city is best for you, look into doing some research on that area’s neighborhoods to find the best fit. A semi-official map of Chicago’s neighborhoods can be found here.

The Loop: The central hub of Chicago, dubbed “the loop” due to the circular path that the elevated trains take around it, is mainly considered a commercial area. It boasts the quintessential Chicago landmarks, including skyscrapers, museums, Grant and Millennium Parks, a theatre district, and a large shopping district. Housing in the loop tends to be sparser and located more toward the perimeter. This area is bustling during the day. Living spaces are compact high-rise condominium and apartment buildings. Generally, the further your living proximity from the loop, the lower cost, more spacious, and more “residential” your apartment will tend to be.

North side: Closer to the loop and Michigan Avenue’s “Magnificent Mile” shopping district. There are many town houses around these neighborhoods, too. As you continue north, rent drops a little and the streets become tree-lined, yet population rises considerably. The north side, as a whole, is the most densely populated section of the city, especially along the lakefront. This area has a lot of neighborhood amenities, parks, and nightlife. It boasts a pretty even number of two and three-flat buildings, vintage courtyard buildings, and high-rises of all different types, with pockets of single-family homes woven in.

South side: The south side covers a much larger land area. Some parts of the south side are quaint, residential communities, and some are rather old and historic.The neighborhoods here have more single-family homes and smaller buildings. Millions of Chicagoans still call it home.

West side: Just west of the loop has historically been an industrial zone; the famous Chicago Union Stockyards were once located here. Closer to downtown, you’ll find loft-style condominiums and old warehouses converted into restaurants and galleries, as well as one of the largest medical districts in the United States. Further out, more stand-alone houses, town homes and bungalows appear.

Urban Circulation

If this city had a heartbeat, its veins would be rich with commuters. The question is really not whether you’ll be able to get around the city, but how you will get around the city. As with any metropolis, Chicago is easily walk-able, but some distances are just too far.

Public Transit: Chicago has the second largest public transportation system in the United States. Eight train lines (both elevated and underground) and over 140 bus routes operate daily all over the city; some run 24/7, others only at peak hours. For commuting further from the city limits, the regional transit authority operates 11 Metra rail lines and suburban buses that service over 200 stations in cities ranging as far as southern Wisconsin and northern Indiana.

Biking: Chicago is a big city for biking (surprisingly) year-round. Bike lanes can be spotted along many major streets. Bike paths also run along large portions of the lakefront for a more leisurely commute.

Driving: Generally one of the least desirable forms of transportation in Chicago, yet a lot of people still do it. Finding an apartment with a designated parking spot can be difficult and pricey in many areas of the city (think an extra $150 - $200 a month for a spot in a parking garage or outdoor lot), and street parking is a cutthroat battle. Don’t even get me started on driving through the city at rush hour. If you need to have a car in Chicago, be forewarned that it will probably become very expensive and frustrating very quickly.

Chicago is rich in history and culture, while still being a modern city. With this much variety, you’ll be able to find the right place for your lifestyle or budget, all within an exciting urban setting. Hopefully this guide has given you a more concrete idea of what to expect and how to get started on your search. Happy hunting!

Urban Circulation
+

If this city had a heartbeat, its veins would be rich with commuters. The question is really not whether you’ll be able to get around the city, but how you will get around the city. As with any metropolis, Chicago is easily walk-able, but some distances are just too far.

Public Transit: Chicago has the second largest public transportation system in the United States. Eight train lines (both elevated and underground) and over 140 bus routes operate daily all over the city; some run 24/7, others only at peak hours. For commuting further from the city limits, the regional transit authority operates 11 Metra rail lines and suburban buses that service over 200 stations in cities ranging as far as southern Wisconsin and northern Indiana.

Biking: Chicago is a big city for biking (surprisingly) year-round. Bike lanes can be spotted along many major streets. Bike paths also run along large portions of the lakefront for a more leisurely commute.

Driving: Generally one of the least desirable forms of transportation in Chicago, yet a lot of people still do it. Finding an apartment with a designated parking spot can be difficult and pricey in many areas of the city (think an extra $150 - $200 a month for a spot in a parking garage or outdoor lot), and street parking is a cutthroat battle. Don’t even get me started on driving through the city at rush hour. If you need to have a car in Chicago, be forewarned that it will probably become very expensive and frustrating very quickly.

Chicago is rich in history and culture, while still being a modern city. With this much variety, you’ll be able to find the right place for your lifestyle or budget, all within an exciting urban setting. Hopefully this guide has given you a more concrete idea of what to expect and how to get started on your search. Happy hunting!

Read More

City Guide

Chicago
"Maybe we can show government how to operate better as a result of better architecture. Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world." (Frank Lloyd Wright)
"Maybe we can show government how to operate better as a result of better architecture. Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world." (Frank Lloyd Wright)

Ah, Chicago, metropolis of the Midwest! Being the third largest city in the United States, Chicago is a major nerve center for business, culture, and entertainment. Though it’s no longer just a rest stop between the east and west coasts, the Big Onion still has a whole world to offer. From urban skyscrapers and honking taxis along Lakeshore Drive, to tree-lined streets and grassy parks, there is a niche for every taste. With almost 4 million people calling the windy city their home, though, finding your own place in the chaos can seem like a daunting task.

Having trouble with Craigslist Chicago? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

The world was first introduced to the Ferris Wheel at the 1983 World Fair in Chicago. The construction astounded the public, and has been replicated consistently all over the world for well over a century. This Ferris Wheel at Chicago's Navy Pier can seat up to 240 people.

Wrigley Field has been home to the Chicago Cubs since 1916, and in that time has hosted everything from skiing events to Chicago's football team to circus elephants! While the Cubs might not be the nation's most promising baseball teams, their fans are undoubtedly loyal and their hot dogs are worth the trip alone.

Chicago is an architecture lover's dream - and with the Buckingham Fountain in the middle of Chicago's legendary Grant Park, why wouldn't it be? This gem of a landmark was designed after one of the fountains at Versailles Palace, and is one the largest fountains in the world!

Basic Tips on Chicago Living

Everyone knows you don’t put ketchup on a Chicago-style hot dog, and everyone knows that trying to travel through Wrigleyville during a Cubs game will be a mob scene. Here are a few other bits of city-specific advice for fledgling Chicagoans. Though renting stand-alone houses is definitely not unheard of here, the most common living arrangements are apartments and condominiums, the latter of which are sometimes rented out privately by their owners. The range of styles, ages and quality amongst them, however, varies depending on where you’re looking and how much you’re willing to spend. Knowing this, how on earth do you even get started?

Basic Tips on Chicago Living
+

Everyone knows you don’t put ketchup on a Chicago-style hot dog, and everyone knows that trying to travel through Wrigleyville during a Cubs game will be a mob scene. Here are a few other bits of city-specific advice for fledgling Chicagoans. Though renting stand-alone houses is definitely not unheard of here, the most common living arrangements are apartments and condominiums, the latter of which are sometimes rented out privately by their owners. The range of styles, ages and quality amongst them, however, varies depending on where you’re looking and how much you’re willing to spend. Knowing this, how on earth do you even get started?

How to Find an Apartment

It’s always best to know what you want in an apartment first. What’s important to you? What’s your price range? Are you willing to sacrifice size for location? Do you want a vintage flat, a hole-in-the-wall studio, or an updated 40th floor pad with a panoramic view of Lake Michigan? One great thing about apartment hunting in Chicago is that there are multiple services that will take down all your criteria, and then drive you around the city to see multiple options, free of charge. Of course, there are always Internet listings, newspaper ads, and for many areas, a simple walk through the neighborhood to glimpse “for rent” signs will suffice.

Chicago really has no defined “rental season”. Apartments are available year-round, though if anything, there are more options and they tend to go quicker and rent higher in the spring and fall. During these seasons, you’re more likely to lose a good dwelling to another contender if you don’t act fast. Renting a place out in the middle of January may give you a price or time advantage, but moving a couch up to the fourth floor of a walk-up building when the back staircase is covered in ice may also cause you to think twice.

How to Find an Apartment
+

It’s always best to know what you want in an apartment first. What’s important to you? What’s your price range? Are you willing to sacrifice size for location? Do you want a vintage flat, a hole-in-the-wall studio, or an updated 40th floor pad with a panoramic view of Lake Michigan? One great thing about apartment hunting in Chicago is that there are multiple services that will take down all your criteria, and then drive you around the city to see multiple options, free of charge. Of course, there are always Internet listings, newspaper ads, and for many areas, a simple walk through the neighborhood to glimpse “for rent” signs will suffice.

Chicago really has no defined “rental season”. Apartments are available year-round, though if anything, there are more options and they tend to go quicker and rent higher in the spring and fall. During these seasons, you’re more likely to lose a good dwelling to another contender if you don’t act fast. Renting a place out in the middle of January may give you a price or time advantage, but moving a couch up to the fourth floor of a walk-up building when the back staircase is covered in ice may also cause you to think twice.

What to Expect From A Chicago Pad

Quality and Style: As previously stated, Chicago has every type of dwelling imaginable, though different neighborhoods and price ranges will yield different results. Multi-unit high-rise buildings usually have amenities included, such as a concierge/doorman, a communal rooftop deck, a pool, or a fitness center. These types of buildings will also have more restrictions or fees for moving in and out. Older buildings with radiator heat will often have gas and heat included in the rent, which is a huge advantage in the winter months when heating prices can break $150 - $200 or more a month. Also, you’d be hard-pressed to find an apartment in the city of Chicago that requires you to pay your own water bill.

Common Logistics: A 12-month lease is standard, though occasionally a larger company will throw in financial perks for signing a longer lease. Short-term or month-to-month leases are hard to come by unless you’re subletting or renting from a private landlord. As far as security deposits go, the standard is equivalent to one month’s rent. More and more often, though, management companies are requiring a non-refundable move-in fee (usually between $150 and $300 per person) instead of a security deposit.

Your Renting Arsenal: Here is a list of common things that will be required for a rental application:

  • Photo ID for all applicants
  • It’s perfectly normal (especially with management companies) to require a $25 - $50 non-refundable credit/background check fee per applicant.
  • Expect to provide information on an application including (but not limited to) current employer information, financial information, previous landlord contact information, and personal or professional references.
  • Many larger management companies will require previous bank statements or pay stubs as proof of income
What to Expect From A Chicago Pad
+

Quality and Style: As previously stated, Chicago has every type of dwelling imaginable, though different neighborhoods and price ranges will yield different results. Multi-unit high-rise buildings usually have amenities included, such as a concierge/doorman, a communal rooftop deck, a pool, or a fitness center. These types of buildings will also have more restrictions or fees for moving in and out. Older buildings with radiator heat will often have gas and heat included in the rent, which is a huge advantage in the winter months when heating prices can break $150 - $200 or more a month. Also, you’d be hard-pressed to find an apartment in the city of Chicago that requires you to pay your own water bill.

Common Logistics: A 12-month lease is standard, though occasionally a larger company will throw in financial perks for signing a longer lease. Short-term or month-to-month leases are hard to come by unless you’re subletting or renting from a private landlord. As far as security deposits go, the standard is equivalent to one month’s rent. More and more often, though, management companies are requiring a non-refundable move-in fee (usually between $150 and $300 per person) instead of a security deposit.

Your Renting Arsenal: Here is a list of common things that will be required for a rental application:

  • Photo ID for all applicants
  • It’s perfectly normal (especially with management companies) to require a $25 - $50 non-refundable credit/background check fee per applicant.
  • Expect to provide information on an application including (but not limited to) current employer information, financial information, previous landlord contact information, and personal or professional references.
  • Many larger management companies will require previous bank statements or pay stubs as proof of income
Chicago Neighborhoods

Within the city of Chicago, there are over 200 unique neighborhoods that are fluid and socially constructed, each with their own quirks and day-to-day life. On a much larger (and more general) scale, the city can be broken up into four massive sections. Consider this a “jumping off” point in finding your ‘hood. Once you decide which side of the city is best for you, look into doing some research on that area’s neighborhoods to find the best fit. A semi-official map of Chicago’s neighborhoods can be found here.

The Loop: The central hub of Chicago, dubbed “the loop” due to the circular path that the elevated trains take around it, is mainly considered a commercial area. It boasts the quintessential Chicago landmarks, including skyscrapers, museums, Grant and Millennium Parks, a theatre district, and a large shopping district. Housing in the loop tends to be sparser and located more toward the perimeter. This area is bustling during the day. Living spaces are compact high-rise condominium and apartment buildings. Generally, the further your living proximity from the loop, the lower cost, more spacious, and more “residential” your apartment will tend to be.

North side: Closer to the loop and Michigan Avenue’s “Magnificent Mile” shopping district. There are many town houses around these neighborhoods, too. As you continue north, rent drops a little and the streets become tree-lined, yet population rises considerably. The north side, as a whole, is the most densely populated section of the city, especially along the lakefront. This area has a lot of neighborhood amenities, parks, and nightlife. It boasts a pretty even number of two and three-flat buildings, vintage courtyard buildings, and high-rises of all different types, with pockets of single-family homes woven in.

South side: The south side covers a much larger land area. Some parts of the south side are quaint, residential communities, and some are rather old and historic.The neighborhoods here have more single-family homes and smaller buildings. Millions of Chicagoans still call it home.

West side: Just west of the loop has historically been an industrial zone; the famous Chicago Union Stockyards were once located here. Closer to downtown, you’ll find loft-style condominiums and old warehouses converted into restaurants and galleries, as well as one of the largest medical districts in the United States. Further out, more stand-alone houses, town homes and bungalows appear.

Chicago Neighborhoods
+

Within the city of Chicago, there are over 200 unique neighborhoods that are fluid and socially constructed, each with their own quirks and day-to-day life. On a much larger (and more general) scale, the city can be broken up into four massive sections. Consider this a “jumping off” point in finding your ‘hood. Once you decide which side of the city is best for you, look into doing some research on that area’s neighborhoods to find the best fit. A semi-official map of Chicago’s neighborhoods can be found here.

The Loop: The central hub of Chicago, dubbed “the loop” due to the circular path that the elevated trains take around it, is mainly considered a commercial area. It boasts the quintessential Chicago landmarks, including skyscrapers, museums, Grant and Millennium Parks, a theatre district, and a large shopping district. Housing in the loop tends to be sparser and located more toward the perimeter. This area is bustling during the day. Living spaces are compact high-rise condominium and apartment buildings. Generally, the further your living proximity from the loop, the lower cost, more spacious, and more “residential” your apartment will tend to be.

North side: Closer to the loop and Michigan Avenue’s “Magnificent Mile” shopping district. There are many town houses around these neighborhoods, too. As you continue north, rent drops a little and the streets become tree-lined, yet population rises considerably. The north side, as a whole, is the most densely populated section of the city, especially along the lakefront. This area has a lot of neighborhood amenities, parks, and nightlife. It boasts a pretty even number of two and three-flat buildings, vintage courtyard buildings, and high-rises of all different types, with pockets of single-family homes woven in.

South side: The south side covers a much larger land area. Some parts of the south side are quaint, residential communities, and some are rather old and historic.The neighborhoods here have more single-family homes and smaller buildings. Millions of Chicagoans still call it home.

West side: Just west of the loop has historically been an industrial zone; the famous Chicago Union Stockyards were once located here. Closer to downtown, you’ll find loft-style condominiums and old warehouses converted into restaurants and galleries, as well as one of the largest medical districts in the United States. Further out, more stand-alone houses, town homes and bungalows appear.

Urban Circulation

If this city had a heartbeat, its veins would be rich with commuters. The question is really not whether you’ll be able to get around the city, but how you will get around the city. As with any metropolis, Chicago is easily walk-able, but some distances are just too far.

Public Transit: Chicago has the second largest public transportation system in the United States. Eight train lines (both elevated and underground) and over 140 bus routes operate daily all over the city; some run 24/7, others only at peak hours. For commuting further from the city limits, the regional transit authority operates 11 Metra rail lines and suburban buses that service over 200 stations in cities ranging as far as southern Wisconsin and northern Indiana.

Biking: Chicago is a big city for biking (surprisingly) year-round. Bike lanes can be spotted along many major streets. Bike paths also run along large portions of the lakefront for a more leisurely commute.

Driving: Generally one of the least desirable forms of transportation in Chicago, yet a lot of people still do it. Finding an apartment with a designated parking spot can be difficult and pricey in many areas of the city (think an extra $150 - $200 a month for a spot in a parking garage or outdoor lot), and street parking is a cutthroat battle. Don’t even get me started on driving through the city at rush hour. If you need to have a car in Chicago, be forewarned that it will probably become very expensive and frustrating very quickly.

Chicago is rich in history and culture, while still being a modern city. With this much variety, you’ll be able to find the right place for your lifestyle or budget, all within an exciting urban setting. Hopefully this guide has given you a more concrete idea of what to expect and how to get started on your search. Happy hunting!

Urban Circulation
+

If this city had a heartbeat, its veins would be rich with commuters. The question is really not whether you’ll be able to get around the city, but how you will get around the city. As with any metropolis, Chicago is easily walk-able, but some distances are just too far.

Public Transit: Chicago has the second largest public transportation system in the United States. Eight train lines (both elevated and underground) and over 140 bus routes operate daily all over the city; some run 24/7, others only at peak hours. For commuting further from the city limits, the regional transit authority operates 11 Metra rail lines and suburban buses that service over 200 stations in cities ranging as far as southern Wisconsin and northern Indiana.

Biking: Chicago is a big city for biking (surprisingly) year-round. Bike lanes can be spotted along many major streets. Bike paths also run along large portions of the lakefront for a more leisurely commute.

Driving: Generally one of the least desirable forms of transportation in Chicago, yet a lot of people still do it. Finding an apartment with a designated parking spot can be difficult and pricey in many areas of the city (think an extra $150 - $200 a month for a spot in a parking garage or outdoor lot), and street parking is a cutthroat battle. Don’t even get me started on driving through the city at rush hour. If you need to have a car in Chicago, be forewarned that it will probably become very expensive and frustrating very quickly.

Chicago is rich in history and culture, while still being a modern city. With this much variety, you’ll be able to find the right place for your lifestyle or budget, all within an exciting urban setting. Hopefully this guide has given you a more concrete idea of what to expect and how to get started on your search. Happy hunting!

Rent Report
Chicago

January 2021 Chicago Rent Report

Welcome to the January 2021 Chicago Rent Report. Chicago rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Chicago rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Chicago rents decline sharply over the past month

Chicago rents have declined 3.0% over the past month, and are down sharply by 11.9% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Chicago stand at $1,094 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,206 for a two-bedroom. This is the eighth straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in April. Chicago's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -5.8%, as well as the national average of -1.5%.

    Chicago rents more affordable than many other large cities nationwide

    As rents have fallen sharply in Chicago, similar cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Chicago is also more affordable than most comparable cities across the country.

    • Chicago's median two-bedroom rent of $1,206 is above the national average of $1,090. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.5% over the past year compared to the 11.9% decline in Chicago.
    • While rents in Chicago fell sharply over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Columbus (+2.7%) and Detroit (+1.4%).
    • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Chicago than most similar cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,305, which is more than one-and-a-half times the price in Chicago.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    January 2021 Chicago Rent Report

    Welcome to the January 2021 Chicago Rent Report. Chicago rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Chicago rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    View full Rent Report

    January 2021 Chicago Rent Report

    Welcome to the January 2021 Chicago Rent Report. Chicago rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Chicago rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    Chicago rents decline sharply over the past month

    Chicago rents have declined 3.0% over the past month, and are down sharply by 11.9% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Chicago stand at $1,094 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,206 for a two-bedroom. This is the eighth straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in April. Chicago's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -5.8%, as well as the national average of -1.5%.

      Chicago rents more affordable than many other large cities nationwide

      As rents have fallen sharply in Chicago, similar cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Chicago is also more affordable than most comparable cities across the country.

      • Chicago's median two-bedroom rent of $1,206 is above the national average of $1,090. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.5% over the past year compared to the 11.9% decline in Chicago.
      • While rents in Chicago fell sharply over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Columbus (+2.7%) and Detroit (+1.4%).
      • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Chicago than most similar cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,305, which is more than one-and-a-half times the price in Chicago.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

      Chicago Renter Confidence Survey
      National study of renter’s satisfaction with their cities and states

      Here’s how Chicago ranks on:

      B-
      Overall satisfaction
      D
      Safety and crime rate
      C
      Jobs and career opportunities
      B+
      Recreational activities
      C
      Affordability
      B+
      Social Life
      C+
      Commute time
      A+
      Public transit
      C+
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Chicago’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Chicago renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Chicago, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Chicago include the following:

      • Chicago renters gave their city a B- overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Chicago were public transit and social life, which received grades of A+ and B+, respectively.
      • The areas of concern to Chicago renters are quality of local schools and state and local taxes, which both received F grades.
      • Chicago millennials are moderately satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B-, while renters who are parents were less satisfied, giving it an F grade.
      • Chicago earned similar scores compared to other nearby cities like Milwaukee (B-) and Kansas City (B), but earned higher marks than Detroit (F) and Indianapolis (C+).
      • Chicago did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Los Angeles (C+), Columbus (C+) and Baltimore (C).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "There’s always something to do and no need to drive anywhere. There are lots of great people and tons of jobs." -Matthew H.
      • "I love all of the beautiful scenery, food, and activities whether you’re single or have a family. But the taxes and cost of living is way too high here." -Angela O.
      • "Love the events, downtown area, parks, and nightlife, but I hate the crime." -Anon.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.
      Read More

      Renter Confidence Survey

      Apartment List has released Chicago’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Chicago renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List...

      View full Chicago Renter Survey

      Here’s how Chicago ranks on:

      B-
      Overall satisfaction
      D
      Safety and crime rate
      C
      Jobs and career opportunities
      B+
      Recreational activities
      C
      Affordability
      B+
      Social Life
      C+
      Commute time
      A+
      Public transit
      C+
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Chicago’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Chicago renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Chicago, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Chicago include the following:

      • Chicago renters gave their city a B- overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Chicago were public transit and social life, which received grades of A+ and B+, respectively.
      • The areas of concern to Chicago renters are quality of local schools and state and local taxes, which both received F grades.
      • Chicago millennials are moderately satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B-, while renters who are parents were less satisfied, giving it an F grade.
      • Chicago earned similar scores compared to other nearby cities like Milwaukee (B-) and Kansas City (B), but earned higher marks than Detroit (F) and Indianapolis (C+).
      • Chicago did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Los Angeles (C+), Columbus (C+) and Baltimore (C).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "There’s always something to do and no need to drive anywhere. There are lots of great people and tons of jobs." -Matthew H.
      • "I love all of the beautiful scenery, food, and activities whether you’re single or have a family. But the taxes and cost of living is way too high here." -Angela O.
      • "Love the events, downtown area, parks, and nightlife, but I hate the crime." -Anon.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.