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313 Apartments for rent in Arlington, VA

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Last updated August 17 at 2:43AM
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City Guide
Arlington
Neighborhoods

Arlington is, in a sense, the best of both worlds. For those looking to play just as hard as they work, this is the city for you. While Arlington is an urban environment thanks to its distance to D.C. and its large population, it is still very much a suburb at its core. Taking the best parts of city life and mixing them with the simplicity of suburban bliss, there is a block and a home for every potential resident. The general makeup of D.C.’s little sister city is a treasure trove of older two-story, single-family homes, high rise condos, townhomes and luxury apartments.

Here we have the best areas of Arlington for you to choose from. Just simply close your eyes and point.

Ballston/Virginia Square: Has its own Metro stop and its mixture of townhomes and older homes. Home to new condos, near N. Randolph Street or N. Quincy Street near Liberty Center. Ballston boasts a number of parks, restaurants and bars, as well as its own mall, making it a perfect spot for active residents. From street fairs to ice skating rinks, there is always something to do in this area of Arlington.

Clarendon/Courthouse: The “county seat” of Arlington, the Courthouse area is made-up of businesses, as well as condos, townhomes, apartments and co-op housing. The neighborhood does indeed gets its name from the government building that occupies most of its area. Day time hustle and bustle is typical as commuters and government workers make their way around town. This area is home to a variety of bars and restaurants and is a great spot for individuals who want a bit of “downtown” life, as it often plays host to farmers markets and parades.

Arlington Ridge: This area consists mainly of older homes (built in 1920s and 1930s), with yards. Nestled on tree-lined streets, these homes are larger single-family dwellings (3-5 bedrooms), often colonial-style, and have a history. This area is the ideal place for those looking for a bit of suburbia. There are also a few luxury apartment complexes to choose from in the area. The neighborhood can be fairly costly (a one bedroom apartment starts at $1500/month). It is also only a short walk to “downtown” areas like Crystal City/Pentagon.

Crystal City: A unique part of the city, the appeal of Crystal City is that it bridges together work and play. One of the more cost effective areas of Arlington, Crystal City connects office buildings with apartments through an underground corridor. Residents here virtually never have to leave “home” to eat, shop, work and/or exercise. In fact, some of the apartments here offer rooftop fitness areas. An “underground city”, Crystal City also features an underground shopping mall.

Lyons Village: A quaint neighborhood between Clarendon and Ballston, Lyons Village boasts single-family homes, built in the 1920s. Many of the homes in this area have well-sized yards and gardens, as well as 3-5 bedroom floor plans. A reasonably priced neighborhood, perfect for morning jogs or bike rides, Lyons Village also offers townhomes and garden-style apartments for those looking for a smaller place to call home.

Many apartments here offer upgraded amenities including washer/dryer in the unit, fireplaces, on-site shopping and dry cleaners. Each complex has something to offer so shop around for which amenities you prefer.

Metro cards, HOVs and Bicycles – Oh, my!

Commuting in Arlington is simply a way of life. Whether you’re walking, biking or carpooling to work, odds are there is a small to medium-sized commute in your everyday schedule – but the beauty of the commute in Arlington is that it can be done fairly easily. Although traffic around the Arlington/DC area (Interstate 395 and Interstate 66) can be a bit of a nightmare (average commute times between 30-45 minutes), HOV lanes and carpool lanes are a useful and popular tool. In addition, Arlington is home to eleven of thirty-three Metro stops, which makes living here and working elsewhere very convenient. It is also very easy to walk, take the bus, the Virginia Railway commuter train or commute via bicycle. For frequent travelers, the city is home to Ronald Reagan Airport, one of the nation’s best and most popular airports.

Weather

The climate in Arlington allows for residents to experience all four seasons. Spring and fall here are pleasant with temperatures mild enough to enjoy the outdoors and the changing leaves. Summer is fairly warm, with July being the most brutal. Winter here gets a bit cold, with January being the coldest month of the year. Temperatures can soar to the upper 90s in July. Dress accordingly for the commute during the summer, as the Metro can get crowded and warm.

Rent Report
Arlington

August 2017 Arlington Rent Report

Welcome to the August 2017 Arlington Rent Report. Arlington rents increased over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Arlington rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro and nation.

Arlington rents increased over the past month

Arlington rents have increased 0.3% over the past month, and are up 0.1% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Arlington stand at $1,780 for a one-bedroom apartment and $2,060 for a two-bedroom. This is the seventh straight month that the city has seen rent increases after a decline in December of last year. Arlington's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 1.7%, as well as the national average of 2.9%.

Rents rising across the DC Metro

Throughout the past year, rent increases have been occurring not just in the city of Arlington, but across the entire metro. Of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in the DC metro, 7 of them have seen prices rise. Virginia as a whole has logged a 1.7% year-over-year growth. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

  • Centreville has seen the fastest rent growth in the metro, with a year-over-year increase of 4.8%. The median two-bedroom there costs $1,910, while one-bedrooms go for $1,650.
  • Over the past year, Waldorf has seen the biggest rent drop in the metro, with decline of 3.0%. Median two-bedrooms there cost $1,930, while one-bedrooms go for $1,670.
  • Frederick has the least expensive rents in the DC metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,490; rents were up 2.1% over the past year but remained flat month-over-month.
  • Bethesda has the most expensive rents of the largest cities in the DC metro, with a two-bedroom median of $2,400; rents fell 1.0% over the past year but remained flat month-over-month.

Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Arlington

Rent growth in Arlington has been relatively stable over the past year - some other large cities have seen more substantial increases, while in a few cases, rents have actually declined. Compared to most large cities across the country, Arlington is less affordable for renters.

  • Arlington's median two-bedroom rent of $2,060 is above the national average of $1,160. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.9% over the past year.
  • While rents in Arlington remained moderately stable this year, similar cities saw increases, including Seattle (+5.6%), Los Angeles (+4.8%), Chicago (+4.6%); note that median 2BR rents in these cities go for $1,710, $1,730, and $1,290 respectively.
  • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Arlington than most large cities. Comparably, Atlanta has a median 2BR rent of $1,160, where Arlington is more than one-and-a-half times that price.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.
City Median 1BR price Median 2BR price M/M price change Y/Y price change
Washington, DC $1,340 $1,550 0.5% -0.4%
Arlington $1,780 $2,060 0.3% 0.1%
Alexandria $1,580 $1,820 0.4% 1.1%
Germantown $1,670 $1,930 0.8% 2.8%
Silver Spring $1,500 $1,730 0.7% 0.8%
Centreville $1,650 $1,910 -1.1% 4.8%
Waldorf $1,670 $1,930 0.8% -3.0%
Frederick $1,290 $1,490 0.1% 2.1%
Rockville $1,730 $2,000 0.4% 3.1%
Bethesda $2,080 $2,400 -0.1% -1.0%
See more

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

Arlington Renter Confidence Survey
National study of renter confidence in the economy, homeownership, and cities
Here's how Arlington ranks on:
A+ Overall satisfaction
A Safety and crime rate
A Jobs and career opportunities
B+ Recreational activities
D Affordability
C- Quality of schools
B- Weather
C+ Commute time
C State and local taxes
A+ Public transit
C Pet-friendliness
Best Worst
Full data available when viewing on a non-mobile device.
Overview of Findings

Apartment List has released results for Arlington from the second annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. The survey, which drew on responses from over 30,000 renters, provides insight into what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the 105 million American renters nationwide.

“Arlington renters expressed great satisfaction with the city overall,” says Andrew Woo, Director of Data Science at Apartment List. “Many categories received above-average scores.”

Key findings in Arlington include the following:

  • Arlington renters give their city an A+ overall for satisfaction.
  • The highest-rated category for Arlington was its access to public transit, which received an A+ score.
  • Other highly-rated categories were local job and career opportunities (A), safety (A), and access to parks and community events (B+).
  • Some areas of concern for Arlington renters included commute times (C+), the quality of local schools (C-), and affordability/cost of living (D).
  • Compared to other nearby cities, renter satisfaction in Arlington ranks higher than Washington, DC (A-) and Alexandria, VA (B-).
  • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction included Arlington, VA; Lincoln, NE; Pasadena, CA; Boston, MA; and Madison, WI. The lowest rated cities included Newark, NJ; Bronx, NY; Bridgeport, CT; Baltimore, MD; and Salinas, CA.