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134 Apartments for rent in Aurora, CO

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Last updated July 24 at 12:28AM
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City Guide
Aurora
Neighborhoods

The city of Aurora is predominantly suburban and is made up of dozens of neighborhoods. The cost of living in this city is fairly high, as is the case with most of Colorado. Here we have broken down some of the more popular areas of this massive city.

Foxfield: One of the largest areas in Aurora, Foxfield is made up of new, luxury apartments as well as larger single-family homes. Foxfield is a great place for those who are looking to settle or for families looking for a quiet area to rent in. Living in this part of town costs a pretty penny as rents can range between $775and $1800. However, the benefits of living in Foxfield may outweigh the cost. It’s proximity to walking trails, bike paths and golf courses make it a prime Aurora location. Additionally, this well-to-do suburb is only 20 miles from the heart of Denver.

City Center: Called City Center because it is, essentially, the town center of Aurora, this part of town is filled with both young professionals and families alike. A happening part of town, this is the place to live for the person who likes to keep their finger on the pulse of a city. 20-somethings, young professionals, and small families tend to inhabit this “urban” area where apartments, high-rises and luxury living is abundant. Boutiques, restaurants, movie theaters and sports clubs are all within reach at this end of town. With close proximity to downtown Denver and the campus of Colorado University, it’s easy to see why this end of town is the heart of Aurora.

Aurora Hills: This residential area has a little something for everyone. Nearby hospitals, churches, golf courses and parks; Aurora Hills is true suburbia. The homes here are typically a bit older (built in the 1960s) and reasonably priced, especially by Colorado standards. But don’t let the large front yards and split-level houses fool you, this neighborhood also has townhomes and apartments for those looking for a smaller place to call home. Aurora Hills is also home to a solid amount of restaurants and bars that serve up some of the finest food in town. Just beware the rocky mountain oysters (unless you’re into that kind of thing).

Mission Viejo: Modeled after the town of Mission Viejo in California, this area was developed to be a welcomed break from the look of everyday “Colorado” housing. Featuring bike paths, greenbelts, Spanish named streets, and walls and street lights that incorporate Spanish design, Mission Viejo is an eclectic part of town. Featuring more homes for rent than apartments, rates around here are fairly reasonable for Colorado ($1200 for a 4 bedroom/2 bath). Homes in this neighborhood are a bit older (built in 1970s) but well maintained, as Mission Viejo has a very active HOA (homeowner’s association). Part Spain, part California, with a view of nature and that laid-back Colorado feel – make moving here your mission.

A few renting tips:

Good news: Because it gets very cold in Colorado, most newer apartments feature fireplaces, which will help save on heating costs (and Colorado has been known to be cold about 7 months out of the year) and may help ignite a romantic spark or two. Also, many of the apartments and updated homes in the area feature hardwood floors, which add a more upscale, updated look to any dwelling. Bad news: If you are a dog-lover, most apartments allow man’s best friend to move in (with a small deposit) but there are breed restrictions. If you are a sucker for pit bulls, Rottweiler’s and any other breed of dog that may or may not be prone to guarding junk yards, you may want to consider down-sizing your taste.

Get Schooled

If you’re moving to further your own education, Aurora is just minutes away from over eight colleges and universities, including The University of Colorado Denver.

Planes, Trains and Automobiles

Getting from place to place in Aurora can be done fairly easily. The city uses the 9-mile light rail system, a bus line, three main highways (Interstate 70, Interstate 225, E-470 beltway) and is minutes away from the Denver International Airport. The city also features many bike paths for those who wish to “go green.”

Settled by a shady businessman who left bad debts and skipped town, Aurora, which means “dawn,” was once named Fletcher, which means… “Fletcher.” Residents, and soon-to-be residents, should be thankful for this much more ethereal and non-scandal related name. This city that had once been considered the “little sister of Denver” has made a name for itself and has quickly become an ever-growing suburban town filled with families and young professionals. Nicknamed the “gateway to the Rockies,” Aurora is much more than a place on a map – it’s a great place to relocate, get in touch with nature and have one of those infamous rocky mountain beers.

Rent Report
Aurora

July 2017 Aurora Rent Report

Welcome to the July 2017 Aurora Rent Report. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Aurora rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro and nation.

Aurora rents increase sharply over the past month

Aurora rents have increased 1.6% over the past month, and are up significantly by 4.2% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Aurora stand at $1,230 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,550 for a two-bedroom. This is the fifth straight month that the city has seen rent increases after a decline in January. Aurora's year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of 3.5%, as well as the national average of 2.9%.

Rents rising across the Denver Metro

Throughout the past year, rent increases have been occurring not just in the city of Aurora, but across the entire metro. Of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in the Denver metro, all of them have seen prices rise. Colorado as a whole has logged a 3.5% year-over-year growth. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

  • Lone Tree has the most expensive rents in the Denver metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,980; the city has also seen rent growth of 6.1% over the past year, the fastest in the metro.
  • Denver proper has the least expensive rents in the Denver metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,330; rents were up 1.2% over the past month and 2.4% over the past year.

Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Aurora

As rents have increased in Aurora, a few large cities nationwide have seen rents grow more modestly, or in some cases, even decline. Compared to most large cities across the country, Aurora is less affordable for renters.

  • Aurora's median two-bedroom rent of $1,550 is above the national average of $1,150. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.9% over the past year.
  • While Aurora's rents rose over the past year, the city of San Francisco saw a decrease of 0.6%.
  • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Aurora than most large cities. Comparably, Phoenix has a median 2BR rent of $1,020, where Aurora is more than one-and-a-half times that price.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.
City Median 1BR price Median 2BR price M/M price change Y/Y price change
Denver $1,050 $1,330 1.2% 2.4%
Aurora $1,230 $1,550 1.6% 4.2%
Thornton $1,440 $1,820 0.0% 4.7%
Arvada $1,170 $1,480 1.7% 2.8%
Westminster $1,240 $1,570 1.2% 2.2%
Broomfield $1,310 $1,650 0.9% 4.1%
Littleton $1,450 $1,830 0.8% 2.4%
Englewood $1,190 $1,510 0.9% 2.2%
Golden $1,220 $1,540 1.7% 5.1%
Lone Tree $1,560 $1,980 1.7% 6.1%

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

Aurora Renter Confidence Survey
National study of renter confidence in the economy, homeownership, and cities
Here's how Aurora ranks on:
D Overall satisfaction
C- Safety and crime rate
C Jobs and career opportunities
C- Recreational activities
D Affordability
C Quality of schools
C Weather
D Commute time
C State and local taxes
B- Public transit
C- Pet-friendliness
Best Worst
Full data available when viewing on a non-mobile device.
Overview of Findings

Apartment List has released results for Aurora from the second annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. The survey, which drew on responses from over 30,000 renters, provides insight into what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the 105 million American renters nationwide.

“In Aurora, renters report low satisfaction with their city,” says Andrew Woo, Director of Data Science at Apartment List. “They gave near- or below-average scores across the board.”

Key findings in Aurora include the following:

  • Aurora renters give their city a D overall for satisfaction.
  • The highest-rated category for Aurora was its access to public transit, which received a B- score.
  • Renters were somewhat dissatisfied with local job and career opportunities and the quality of local schools, which both receive a score of C.
  • Some of the larger concerns for Aurora renters included safety (C-), commute times (D), and affordability (D).
  • Relative to other Colorado cities like Denver (A-), Fort Collins (A+), and Boulder (A), renters in Aurora were much less satisfied.
  • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction included Arlington, VA; Lincoln, NE; Pasadena, CA; Boston, MA; and Madison, WI. The lowest rated cities included Newark, NJ; Bronx, NY; Bridgeport, CT; Baltimore, MD; and Salinas, CA.