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portland
Last updated September 24 2020 at 6:55 PM

186 Apartments for rent in Portland, OR

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Nob Hill
Downtown Portland
Pearl
Buckman
Richmond
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Check out 186 verified apartments for rent in Portland, OR with rents starting as low as $900. Some apartments for rent in Portland might offer rent specials. Look out for the
$
rent special icon!
Verified
5 Units Available
Slabtown Flats
1885 NW Quimby Street , Portland, OR
Nob Hill
Studio
$1,350
465 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,600
634 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
You know that magical moment in Portland where the forest and the city collide? That’s Slabtown. And within Slabtown, there is a place where history and tradition meet modern design and conveniences.
Verified
20 Units Available
Couch 9
135 NW 9th Ave , Portland, OR
Pearl
Studio
$1,300
523 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,515
772 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,800
1017 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Highly desirable luxury apartments near the Brewery Blocks and Interstate 405. The beautiful units have high ceilings and floor-to-ceiling windows. An on-site tasting room keeps wine enthusiasts happy.
Verified
18 Units Available
East of Eleven
310 Southeast 12th Avenue , Portland, OR
Buckman
Studio
$1,230
494 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,549
643 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
We work hard so you have options. We are now open for in-person tours by appointment and we continue to offer self-guided and live video tours. Home is more important that ever, we want to make sure you can safely and securely find the home you love.
$
Verified
16 Units Available
The Rodney
1470 NW Glisan St , Portland, OR
Old Town Chinatown
Studio
$1,310
502 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,480
811 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$5,360
1462 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
We are excited to announce that we are now scheduling in-person tours by appointment only.
Verified
14 Units Available
The Century
3270 N Vancouver Ave , Portland, OR
Eliot
Studio
$1,101
542 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,167
584 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Building on its reputation for bicycles, beers and brunch, the Williams District has grown into a quaint, must-live location.
$
Verified
1 Unit Available
Move the House Apartments
3810 Southeast Division Street , Portland, OR
Richmond
Studio
$1,250
392 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Move the House is a 26 apartment home mid-rise in the heart of Portland's vibrant Richmond neighborhood. Offering studio, one and two bedroom floor plans.
Verified
3 Units Available
Hawthorne 31 Apartments
1515 Southeast 31st Avenue , Portland, OR
Richmond
Studio
$1,250
381 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,395
519 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Hawthorne 31 is a 30 unit community in the heart of Portland's vibrant Hawthorne District. Make yourself at home in one of our studio or one bedroom apartment homes, each with oversized windows, quartz countertops, and stainless steel appliances.
Verified
15 Units Available
D Street Village
3150 Southeast Division Street , Portland, OR
Richmond
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,250
574 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
WE’VE TRIED TO BUILD A PLACE WHERE LIVING IS COMFORTABLE, EASY AND FUN. Part of this is not just having sweet apartments with great common areas plus parking, but also making sure that the shops on the street make for better neighborhood living.
$
Verified
24 Units Available
Broadstone Tempo
80 Northeast 14th Avenue , Portland, OR
Kerns
Studio
$1,199
488 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,699
668 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,342
1068 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
TOUR YOUR WAY. Meet your new community, on your terms. Our doors are open by appointment-only for self-guided tours. Additionally, virtual tours via video chat are still available.
Verified
2 Units Available
The Bridgetown
4525 Northeast Fremont Street , Portland, OR
Beaumont-Wilshire
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,316
538 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,705
877 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
The Bridgetown is a 50-Unit net zero, eco-friendly apartment building in the NE Beaumont Village neighborhood of Northeast Portland.
$
Verified
9 Units Available
Harrison Tower
222 SW Harrison St , Portland, OR
Downtown Portland
1 Bedroom
$1,347
628 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,895
1129 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,984
1452 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Welcome to Harrison Tower – your urban retreat among the hustle and bustle of Portland, Oregon.
Verified
5 Units Available
Multnomah Village
7711 SW Capitol Hwy , Portland, OR
Multnomah Village
Studio
$1,295
449 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,645
664 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,448
996 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Apartments feature luxury on-site amenities, including a rooftop lounge with BBQ grill and a TV lounge. Interiors include upscale features, such as quartz countertops and wood floors. Located near I-5 and Gabriel Park.
Verified
4 Units Available
The Wilmore
4357 North Williams Avenue , Portland, OR
Humboldt
Studio
$1,299
531 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
/*td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}*/ The Wilmore is located in the exciting North Williams neighborhood at the corner of N. Williams Avenue and N. Skidmore Street.
$
Verified
19 Units Available
Broadstone Reveal
1411 Northwest Quimby Street , Portland, OR
Pearl
1 Bedroom
$1,545
739 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,250
1025 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
TOUR YOUR WAY. Meet your new community, on your terms. Our doors are open by appointment-only for self-guided tours. Additionally, virtual tours via video chat are still available.
$
Verified
11 Units Available
Axcess 15
1500 NE 15th Ave , Portland, OR
Kerns
1 Bedroom
$1,425
738 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,795
974 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Axcess 15 redefines luxury. Located in the heart of the trendy Lloyd District, the one- and two-bedroom apartments are consistently rated among the best in the Portland, OR area.
Verified
38 Units Available
Grant Park Village
1580 NE 32nd Avenue , Portland, OR
Sullivan's Gulch
Studio
$1,159
473 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,184
613 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,992
918 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Hardwood floors, granite counters and stainless steel appliances feature in attractive apartments. Residents enjoy a 24-hour gym, green community, clubhouse and courtyard. Parking available. Easy access to I-84, New Seasons Market, shopping and entertainment options.
$
Verified
3 Units Available
Ella Marie Apartments
1205 Southeast Morrison Street , Portland, OR
Buckman
1 Bedroom
$1,771
704 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,292
901 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Ella Marie is sophisticated living in Portland’s newly-evolving Central Eastside.Throughout a mix of warehouses and industrial buildings you will find emerging microbreweries, restaurants and never-ending ways to spend your time.
Verified
20 Units Available
Laurel 42
4242 Northeast Halsey Street , Portland, OR
Hollywood
Studio
$1,145
483 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,425
717 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Laurel42 is contemporary living with a hint of vintage charm. If you’re looking for a thoughtfully-designed home with access to thoroughfares and transit hubs, and an artsy, bustling neighborhood, then Laurel42 is for you. Your Urban Oasis Awaits
$
Verified
4 Units Available
The Marilyn
2390 Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard , Portland, OR
Hosford-Abernethy
Studio
$1,274
482 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,450
616 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
NOW LEASING: Modern Hawthorne living, offering studio and one bedroom floor plans.
Verified
6 Units Available
38 Davis
38 NW Davis St , Portland, OR
Old Town Chinatown
Studio
$1,299
424 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,379
513 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Located near the galleries, nightlife, and restaurants. On-site fitness center, bike parking and wash area, and rooftop deck with a view. Homes offer LED lighting and ENERGY Star appliances. Pets welcome.
Verified
14 Units Available
Savier Street Flats
2270 NW Savier St , Portland, OR
Nob Hill
Studio
$1,268
559 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,201
670 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,244
1022 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Close to Wallace Park and Route 30. Large and modern apartments with open-plan kitchen, modern appliances, garbage disposal, and patio/balcony. Community offers a courtyard, dog grooming facilities, a pool, and a guest suite.
Verified
5 Units Available
The Hawthorne PDX
4717 Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard , Portland, OR
Sunnyside
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,285
555 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
The Hawthorne is more than just an apartment building- its a community, a community built to give its resident’s all they need to work, live and enjoy the Hawthorne District and all Portland has to offer.
Verified
1 Unit Available
Crown Royal
1912 NE Schuyler St , Portland, OR
Irvington
1 Bedroom
$1,183
659 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
In historic Irvington, units feature large closets, separate dining rooms and wood-like flooring. Near popular Portland attractions like Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden, the Lloyd Center and Holladay Park. Easy access to Interstates 5 and 84.
$
Verified
43 Units Available
The Douglas
2083 SW River Dr , Portland, OR
Downtown Portland
Studio
$1,195
440 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,499
759 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,090
1002 sqft
Last updated September 24 at 06:45 PM
Our office is currently closed to the public in support of community health efforts.

Median Rent in Portland

Last updated Aug. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Portland is $1,118, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,319.
Studio
$1,005
1 Bed
$1,118
2 Beds
$1,319
3+ Beds
$1,921
Find More Rentals By

Bedrooms

Portland 1 Bedroom ApartmentsPortland 2 Bedroom ApartmentsPortland Studio Apartments

Bedrooms

Find More Rentals in Nearby
Find an apartment for rent in Portland, OR

Searching for an apartment for rent in Portland, OR? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 186 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Portland. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in Portland is $1,005 for a studio, $1,118 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $1,319 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Portland apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Portland, OR apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Portland?
In Portland, the median rent is $1,005 for a studio, $1,118 for a 1-bedroom, $1,319 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,921 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Portland, check out our monthly Portland Rent Report.
How much is rent in Portland?
In Portland, the median rent is $1,005 for a studio, $1,118 for a 1-bedroom, $1,319 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,921 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Portland, check out our monthly Portland Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Portland?
You can filter cheap apartments in Portland by price: under $1,200, under $1,100, under $1,000, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Portland?
You can filter cheap apartments in Portland by price: under $1,200, under $1,100, under $1,000, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Portland?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Portland apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Portland?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Portland apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Portland properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Portland properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Portland?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Portland.
How much should I pay for rent in Portland?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Portland.
How can I find off-campus housing in Portland?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Portland. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Lewis & Clark College, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland Community College, University of Western States, and Concordia University-Portland.
How can I find off-campus housing in Portland?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Portland. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Lewis & Clark College, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland Community College, University of Western States, and Concordia University-Portland.
City GuidePortland
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")

Portland, where the dream of the 90s is still alive! Whether you’re an outdoor sports guru interested in maximizing your time on mountain and coast or a caffeinated fashionista joining the hipster pilgrimage, Portland, Oregon, is a fun and funky place to inhabit. But the intention to be a Portlander is only part of the formula; you still need a place to crash, right? Let’s find you a flippin’ sweet apartment.

Having trouble with Craigslist Portland? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

Cathedral Park and St. John's Bridge

Trees blossoming at Reed's College

View of Portland, OR

Living in the Pacific Northwest

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Living in the Pacific Northwest
+

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System
+

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Read More
City GuidePortland
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")

Portland, where the dream of the 90s is still alive! Whether you’re an outdoor sports guru interested in maximizing your time on mountain and coast or a caffeinated fashionista joining the hipster pilgrimage, Portland, Oregon, is a fun and funky place to inhabit. But the intention to be a Portlander is only part of the formula; you still need a place to crash, right? Let’s find you a flippin’ sweet apartment.

Having trouble with Craigslist Portland? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

Cathedral Park and St. John's Bridge

Trees blossoming at Reed's College

View of Portland, OR

Living in the Pacific Northwest

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Living in the Pacific Northwest
+

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System
+

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Rent Report
Portland

September 2020 Portland Rent Report

Welcome to the September 2020 Portland Rent Report. Portland rents remained steady over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Portland rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

Portland rents held steady over the past month

Portland rents have remained steady over the past month, but are down moderately by 1.6% year-over-year. Currently, median rents in Portland stand at $1,119 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,320 for a two-bedroom. Portland's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -0.4%, as well as the national average of 0.3%.

    Rents falling across the Portland Metro

    Rent prices have been decreasing not just in Portland over the past year, but across the entire metro. Of the largest 10 cities in the Portland metro for which we have data, 6 of them have seen prices drop. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

    • Portland proper has the least expensive rents in the Portland metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,320; the city has also seen rents fall by 0.0% over the past month, the biggest drop in the metro.
    • Forest Grove has seen the fastest rent growth in the metro, with a year-over-year increase of 1.8%. The median two-bedroom there costs $1,453, while one-bedrooms go for $1,232.
    • Hillsboro has the most expensive rents of the largest cities in the Portland metro, with a two-bedroom median of $2,068; rents increased 0.6% over the past month but fell 2.0% over the past year.

    Portland rents more affordable than many comparable cities nationwide

    As rents have fallen moderately in Portland, a few similar cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Portland is also more affordable than most other large cities across the country.

    • Although rents across cities in Oregon have been significantly decreasing, the state's growth as a whole has held steady over the past year. For example, rents have fallen by 1.0% in Eugene and 3.0% in Salem.
    • Portland's median two-bedroom rent of $1,320 is above the national average of $1,195. Nationwide, rents have held steady over the past year.
    • While rents in Portland fell moderately over the past year, the city of Phoenix saw an increase of 1.7%.
    • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Portland than most comparable cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,956, which is more than twice the price in Portland.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

    City
    Median 1BR Rent
    Median 2BR Rent
    M/M Rent Growth
    Y/Y Rent Growth
    Portland
    $1,120
    $1,320
    0
    -1.6%
    Vancouver
    $1,430
    $1,690
    0.3%
    0.6%
    Gresham
    $1,410
    $1,660
    0.1%
    -1.6%
    Hillsboro
    $1,750
    $2,070
    0.6%
    -2%
    Beaverton
    $1,560
    $1,840
    0.3%
    0.4%
    Lake Oswego
    $1,520
    $1,800
    0.1%
    1.5%
    Tualatin
    $1,610
    $1,900
    0.8%
    -5.2%
    Forest Grove
    $1,230
    $1,450
    0
    1.8%
    Wilsonville
    $1,490
    $1,760
    1.3%
    -0.6%
    Canby
    $1,490
    $1,750
    0.5%
    -6.6%
    Gladstone
    $1,530
    $1,800
    0.2%
    2%
    Fairview
    $1,530
    $1,810
    0.3%
    -0.8%
    See More

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology here.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    September 2020 Portland Rent Report

    Welcome to the September 2020 Portland Rent Report. Portland rents remained steady over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Portland rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

    View full Rent Report

    September 2020 Portland Rent Report

    Welcome to the September 2020 Portland Rent Report. Portland rents remained steady over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Portland rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

    Portland rents held steady over the past month

    Portland rents have remained steady over the past month, but are down moderately by 1.6% year-over-year. Currently, median rents in Portland stand at $1,119 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,320 for a two-bedroom. Portland's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -0.4%, as well as the national average of 0.3%.

      Rents falling across the Portland Metro

      Rent prices have been decreasing not just in Portland over the past year, but across the entire metro. Of the largest 10 cities in the Portland metro for which we have data, 6 of them have seen prices drop. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

      • Portland proper has the least expensive rents in the Portland metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,320; the city has also seen rents fall by 0.0% over the past month, the biggest drop in the metro.
      • Forest Grove has seen the fastest rent growth in the metro, with a year-over-year increase of 1.8%. The median two-bedroom there costs $1,453, while one-bedrooms go for $1,232.
      • Hillsboro has the most expensive rents of the largest cities in the Portland metro, with a two-bedroom median of $2,068; rents increased 0.6% over the past month but fell 2.0% over the past year.

      Portland rents more affordable than many comparable cities nationwide

      As rents have fallen moderately in Portland, a few similar cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Portland is also more affordable than most other large cities across the country.

      • Although rents across cities in Oregon have been significantly decreasing, the state's growth as a whole has held steady over the past year. For example, rents have fallen by 1.0% in Eugene and 3.0% in Salem.
      • Portland's median two-bedroom rent of $1,320 is above the national average of $1,195. Nationwide, rents have held steady over the past year.
      • While rents in Portland fell moderately over the past year, the city of Phoenix saw an increase of 1.7%.
      • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Portland than most comparable cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,956, which is more than twice the price in Portland.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

      City
      Median 1BR Rent
      Median 2BR Rent
      M/M Rent Growth
      Y/Y Rent Growth
      Portland
      $1,120
      $1,320
      0
      -1.6%
      Vancouver
      $1,430
      $1,690
      0.3%
      0.6%
      Gresham
      $1,410
      $1,660
      0.1%
      -1.6%
      Hillsboro
      $1,750
      $2,070
      0.6%
      -2%
      Beaverton
      $1,560
      $1,840
      0.3%
      0.4%
      Lake Oswego
      $1,520
      $1,800
      0.1%
      1.5%
      Tualatin
      $1,610
      $1,900
      0.8%
      -5.2%
      Forest Grove
      $1,230
      $1,450
      0
      1.8%
      Wilsonville
      $1,490
      $1,760
      1.3%
      -0.6%
      Canby
      $1,490
      $1,750
      0.5%
      -6.6%
      Gladstone
      $1,530
      $1,800
      0.2%
      2%
      Fairview
      $1,530
      $1,810
      0.3%
      -0.8%
      See More

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology here.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

      Portland Renter Confidence Survey
      National study of renter’s satisfaction with their cities and states

      Here’s how Portland ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      B+
      Safety and crime rate
      B-
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A-
      Recreational activities
      D
      Affordability
      B-
      Quality of schools
      B+
      Social Life
      C+
      Weather
      C
      Commute time
      B+
      State and local taxes
      A
      Public transit
      A
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Portland’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Portland renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Portland, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Portland include the following:

      • Portland renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Portland were pet-friendliness and public transit, which both received scores of A.
      • The areas of concern to Portland renters are affordability and commute time, which received D and C scores, respectively.
      • Portland millennials are moderately satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B.
      • Portland did relatively well compared to other Pacific Northwest cities like Spokane (C+) and Tacoma (C+), but earned lower marks than Seattle (B+) and Beaverton (B+).
      • Portland did relatively poorly compared to similar cities nationwide, including Austin (A-), Nashville (A-) and Boston (A).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "There are so many activities both in and outside of the city. Unfortunately, rent is skyrocketing and traffic is getting worse." -Nolan B.
      • "People love living in Portland, which makes it a happy, fun environment. However, people love it so much that it’s crowded and expensive, too." -Chelsea C.
      • "I love how green and vibrant everything is, especially in the summer. I also like the laid-back atmosphere." -Ashley M.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.
      Read More

      Renter Confidence Survey

      Apartment List has released Portland’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Portland renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment Li...

      View full Portland Renter Survey

      Here’s how Portland ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      B+
      Safety and crime rate
      B-
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A-
      Recreational activities
      D
      Affordability
      B-
      Quality of schools
      B+
      Social Life
      C+
      Weather
      C
      Commute time
      B+
      State and local taxes
      A
      Public transit
      A
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Portland’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Portland renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Portland, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Portland include the following:

      • Portland renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Portland were pet-friendliness and public transit, which both received scores of A.
      • The areas of concern to Portland renters are affordability and commute time, which received D and C scores, respectively.
      • Portland millennials are moderately satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B.
      • Portland did relatively well compared to other Pacific Northwest cities like Spokane (C+) and Tacoma (C+), but earned lower marks than Seattle (B+) and Beaverton (B+).
      • Portland did relatively poorly compared to similar cities nationwide, including Austin (A-), Nashville (A-) and Boston (A).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "There are so many activities both in and outside of the city. Unfortunately, rent is skyrocketing and traffic is getting worse." -Nolan B.
      • "People love living in Portland, which makes it a happy, fun environment. However, people love it so much that it’s crowded and expensive, too." -Chelsea C.
      • "I love how green and vibrant everything is, especially in the summer. I also like the laid-back atmosphere." -Ashley M.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.