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Last updated November 30 2020 at 10:05 AM

4,319 Apartments for rent in Portland, OR - p. 9

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Check out 4,319 verified apartments for rent in Portland, OR with rents starting as low as $800. Some apartments for rent in Portland might offer rent specials. Look out for the
$
rent special icon!
$
Verified
Contact for Availability
Linc301
301 SW Lincoln St
Portland, OR | Downtown Portland
1 Bedroom
$1,125
724 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,605
950 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 09:05 PM
Minutes from I-405, University Place and downtown Portland. These recently renovated apartments are available fully furnished and have stainless steel appliances. Pet-friendly. On-site pool, sauna, coffee bar and concierge service. Guest suite and parking available.
Verified
4 Units Available
Park Plaza
1969 SW Park Ave
Portland, OR | Downtown Portland
Studio
$1,124
426 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,133
567 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,556
877 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:28 PM
Recently remodeled units with hardwood floors, air conditioning and extra storage space. The pet-friendly community has a convenient online portal for payments and maintenance requests. Located downtown, close to Portland Art Museum.
Verified
21 Units Available
Asa Flats and Lofts
1200 NW Marshall St
Portland, OR | Pearl
Studio
$1,150
605 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,357
839 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,302
1219 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
Just minutes from I-405 and the waterway. On-site gym, concierge service and grill area. Green community. Apartments offer granite countertops, hardwood floors and stainless steel appliances. Guest suite available.
$
Verified
47 Units Available
NV
1261 NW Overton St
Portland, OR | Pearl
1 Bedroom
$1,510
863 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,980
1216 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:28 PM
Located in Portland's Pearl District, near the Willamette River, parks and public transportation. Twenty-six story building with stylish one- and two-bedroom apartments, all with stainless-steel appliances, dramatic city views and in-suite laundry facilities. Garage.
$
Verified
168 Units Available
Denizen
2050 NE Hoyt Street
Portland, OR | Old Town Chinatown
Studio
$1,280
486 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,265
627 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,310
932 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:28 PM
WELCOME TO DENIZEN Denizen is the new, not-so-hidden destination at the vibrant intersection of Portland's eastside industrial district and the lush, historic Laurelhurst neighborood.
$
Verified
35 Units Available
Deveraux Glen
10600 SW Taylor St
Portland, OR | Cedar Hills - Cedar Mill
1 Bedroom
$1,297
800 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,477
1166 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,816
1368 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:28 PM
Gorgeous, pet-friendly complex close to Sunset Highway. Concierge, yoga classes, clubhouse, and hot tub on site. Pets allowed. In-unit laundry. Right next to Merritt Orchard Park.
$
Verified
7 Units Available
Honeyman Hardware Lofts
555 NW Park Ave
Portland, OR | Pearl
Studio
$1,397
829 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,839
1275 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
Modern living in the Pearl District. Within walking distance to restaurants and salons. Apartment community has controlled access and features a rooftop deck. Units boast stainless steel appliances, alarm systems, and vaulted ceilings.
Verified
22 Units Available
The Ardea
3720 SW Bond Ave
Portland, OR | South Portland
Studio
$1,515
860 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,639
968 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,992
1793 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
Convenient to I-5. High-rise apartment community offering spacious studio, one- and two-bedroom floor plans. Apartments feature open living spaces with modern amenities, such as high-end appliances, built-in storage, hardwood floors and stone counters.
$
Verified
6 Units Available
Enso
1400 NW Marshall St
Portland, OR | Pearl
Studio
$1,535
605 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,569
659 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,615
1174 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
Downtown living in Portland's Pearl District! Complex offers a wine room, fire pit, courtyard, and clubhouse. Stainless steel appliances, washers/dryers, and patios or balconies in units. Near I-405 and the Willamette River.
$
Verified
16 Units Available
Cadence
2005 North Williams Avenue
Portland, OR | Eliot
Studio
$1,155
479 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,425
695 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,845
944 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:28 PM
Studio, one- and two-bedroom units available. This complex is modern and upscale, complete with amenities like updated kitchens, stainless steel appliances, open concept floor plans and large living spaces.
$
Verified
9 Units Available
The Dianne Apartments
535 NW 11th Ave
Portland, OR
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,806
706 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$3,095
1127 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
Great location for commuters, just off I-405. Apartments have hardwood floors, laundry, and a patio or balcony. Community features 24-hour maintenance, BBQ grill, and bike storage.
Verified
10 Units Available
The Parker
1447 NW 12th Ave
Portland, OR | Pearl
1 Bedroom
$1,262
595 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,328
915 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
With views of the Willamette River, enjoy these modern apartments showcasing gourmet kitchens, natural wood floors, private patio or balcony and air conditioning. A green-conscious community. On-site benefits include wheelchair access, courtyard, clubhouse and pool.
Verified
9 Units Available
Harbour Court
910 N Harbour Dr
Portland, OR | Bridgeton
1 Bedroom
$1,355
918 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,780
1086 sqft
Last updated November 29 at 11:27 PM
Within walking distance of North Portland Harbor, enjoy a fireplace, in-unit laundry, and modern appliances along with a 24-hour gym, hot tub, key fob access, pool, courtyard, and sauna.
Verified
Contact for Availability
Harrison Square Apartments
8937 N Westanna Ave
Portland, OR | Portsmouth
1 Bedroom
$1,195
2 Bedrooms
$1,395
3 Bedrooms
$1,495
Last updated September 27 at 11:32 PM
Harrison Square is a community of one story duplex style apartment homes, some featuring wood burning fireplaces. It is located in the Portsmouth/St.

Median Rent in Portland

Last updated Nov. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Portland is $1,125, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,312.
Studio
$976
1 Bed
$1,125
2 Beds
$1,312
3+ Beds
$1,685
Find More Rentals By

Bedrooms

Portland 1 Bedroom Apartments

Bedrooms

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Find an apartment for rent in Portland, OR


Searching for an apartment for rent in Portland, OR? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 4,319 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Portland. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in Portland is $976 for a studio, $1,125 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $1,312 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Portland apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Portland, OR apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Portland?
In Portland, the median rent is $976 for a studio, $1,125 for a 1-bedroom, $1,312 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,685 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Portland, check out our monthly Portland Rent Report.
How much is rent in Portland?
In Portland, the median rent is $976 for a studio, $1,125 for a 1-bedroom, $1,312 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,685 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Portland, check out our monthly Portland Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Portland?
You can filter cheap apartments in Portland by price: under $1,200, under $1,100, under $1,000, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Portland?
You can filter cheap apartments in Portland by price: under $1,200, under $1,100, under $1,000, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Portland?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Portland apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Portland?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Portland apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Portland properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Portland properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Portland?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Portland.
How much should I pay for rent in Portland?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Portland.
How can I find off-campus housing in Portland?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Portland. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Oregon Health & Science University, Clark College, Concordia University-Portland, Portland State University, and Reed College.
How can I find off-campus housing in Portland?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Portland. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Oregon Health & Science University, Clark College, Concordia University-Portland, Portland State University, and Reed College.

Median Rent in Portland

Last updated Nov. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Portland is $1,125, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,312.
Studio
$976
1 Bed
$1,125
2 Beds
$1,312
3+ Beds
$1,685

City Guide

Portland
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")

Portland, where the dream of the 90s is still alive! Whether you’re an outdoor sports guru interested in maximizing your time on mountain and coast or a caffeinated fashionista joining the hipster pilgrimage, Portland, Oregon, is a fun and funky place to inhabit. But the intention to be a Portlander is only part of the formula; you still need a place to crash, right? Let’s find you a flippin’ sweet apartment.

Having trouble with Craigslist Portland? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

Cathedral Park and St. John's Bridge

Trees blossoming at Reed's College

View of Portland, OR

Living in the Pacific Northwest

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Living in the Pacific Northwest
+

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System
+

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Read More

City Guide

Portland
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")
"Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz. If that ain't love then tell me what is." (-Loretta Lynn, "Portland Oregon")

Portland, where the dream of the 90s is still alive! Whether you’re an outdoor sports guru interested in maximizing your time on mountain and coast or a caffeinated fashionista joining the hipster pilgrimage, Portland, Oregon, is a fun and funky place to inhabit. But the intention to be a Portlander is only part of the formula; you still need a place to crash, right? Let’s find you a flippin’ sweet apartment.

Having trouble with Craigslist Portland? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

Cathedral Park and St. John's Bridge

Trees blossoming at Reed's College

View of Portland, OR

Living in the Pacific Northwest

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Living in the Pacific Northwest
+

Every region boasts a unique set of perks and challenges to human survival. Here are some considerations you ought to weigh in choosing a place to live.

Rain: Oregon’s called the Evergreen State for a reason: rainfall amounts to forty inches a year in Portland, over half this amount accruing between November and February. So you’ve got to be prepared to conduct your daily existence in the bald threat of wetness. Invest in some good boots and a raincoat. And—if you’re a bike commuter—front and back fenders are absolutely essential.

Sun: The maritime climate may keep temperatures mild (it rarely strays more than fifteen degrees on either side of 53° F, the annual average), but latitude dictates surprisingly short winter days. If you’re worried about seasonal affective disorder, be sure to choose a pad with lots of natural light and south-facing windows.

Transport: Think of Portland as the littlest brother in a trio of Pac NW cities: Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington, lie to the north along the heavily trafficked I-5 corridor. Portland has decent public transport options, and Amtrak offers rail travel north as well as south (to Corvallis and Eugene). But if you aim to make it out to stunning Cannon Beach or up to staggering Mt. Hood, both within a 100 miles of the metro area, you’ll need a car. (Just make sure it’s a hybrid!)

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Neighborhood Breakdown: The Quadrant System
+

Portland is bisected vertically by the Willamette River and horizontally by Burnside St., rendering four quadrants: Southwest, Northwest, Southeast, and Northeast. Yet the ubiquitous “Keep Portland Weird” slogan characterizes even the city’s geography. That’s right, there’s a fifth “quadrant,” North Portland.

SW Portland: Home to two of the city’s largest universities, Portland State and OHSU, Southwest is the quieter option for those hungry for downtown amenities. Upscale dining without the touristy bustle? Find it here. Brownstone duplex apartments.

NW Portland: The veritable heartbeat of Portland’s financial sector. PGE Park hosts MLS soccer games, Powell’s City of Books always has a world-renowned author lecturing, and Nob Hill’s got the highest per capita boutique greeting card stores. The only quadrant where the average building height exceeds five stories. Chic and contemporary studios.

SE Portland: The original bohemian ghetto. This neighborhood birthed Stumptown Coffee almost 20 years ago and Hawthorne St. has more vintage clothing stores than stoplights. Can’t stop showing off your fixie? Contemplating yet another tattoo? You’ll love Southeast. Room in a shared co-op.

NE Portland: Highest percentage of homes on the historic registry. Beautiful, tree-lined avenues scattered by the occasional brewpub or roastery. Serene and suburban (but not, ya know?). Renovated “Old Portland” craftsman house.

N Portland: Recently revitalized, North is quickly becoming the new artist hotbed. Home to Adidas, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge, and a slew of Ethiopian restaurants. Condo near the Mississippi Arts District.

Portland is a diverse town—in more ways than one. Fitting yourself into that diversity can be a trial, but feeling comfortable in your place of residence is propriety number one. Good luck, and welcome to Bridgetown, USA!

Rent Report
Portland

December 2020 Portland Rent Report

Welcome to the December 2020 Portland Rent Report. Portland rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Portland rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Portland rents decline sharply over the past month

Portland rents have declined 1.6% over the past month, and have decreased sharply by 6.5% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Portland stand at $1,126 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,313 for a two-bedroom. This is the eighth straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in March. Portland's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -1.6%, as well as the national average of -1.3%.

    Other large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Portland

    As rents have fallen sharply in Portland, similar cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Compared to most other large cities across the country, Portland is less affordable for renters.

    • Portland's median two-bedroom rent of $1,313 is above the national average of $1,095. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.3% over the past year compared to the 6.5% decline in Portland.
    • While rents in Portland fell sharply over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Las Vegas (+5.1%) and Phoenix (+3.9%).
    • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Portland than most similar cities. For example, Phoenix has a median 2BR rent of $1,154.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    December 2020 Portland Rent Report

    Welcome to the December 2020 Portland Rent Report. Portland rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Portland rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    View full Rent Report

    December 2020 Portland Rent Report

    Welcome to the December 2020 Portland Rent Report. Portland rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Portland rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    Portland rents decline sharply over the past month

    Portland rents have declined 1.6% over the past month, and have decreased sharply by 6.5% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Portland stand at $1,126 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,313 for a two-bedroom. This is the eighth straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in March. Portland's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -1.6%, as well as the national average of -1.3%.

      Other large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Portland

      As rents have fallen sharply in Portland, similar cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Compared to most other large cities across the country, Portland is less affordable for renters.

      • Portland's median two-bedroom rent of $1,313 is above the national average of $1,095. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.3% over the past year compared to the 6.5% decline in Portland.
      • While rents in Portland fell sharply over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Las Vegas (+5.1%) and Phoenix (+3.9%).
      • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Portland than most similar cities. For example, Phoenix has a median 2BR rent of $1,154.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

      Portland Renter Confidence Survey
      National study of renter’s satisfaction with their cities and states

      Here’s how Portland ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      B+
      Safety and crime rate
      B-
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A-
      Recreational activities
      D
      Affordability
      B-
      Quality of schools
      B+
      Social Life
      C+
      Weather
      C
      Commute time
      B+
      State and local taxes
      A
      Public transit
      A
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Portland’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Portland renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Portland, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Portland include the following:

      • Portland renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Portland were pet-friendliness and public transit, which both received scores of A.
      • The areas of concern to Portland renters are affordability and commute time, which received D and C scores, respectively.
      • Portland millennials are moderately satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B.
      • Portland did relatively well compared to other Pacific Northwest cities like Spokane (C+) and Tacoma (C+), but earned lower marks than Seattle (B+) and Beaverton (B+).
      • Portland did relatively poorly compared to similar cities nationwide, including Austin (A-), Nashville (A-) and Boston (A).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "There are so many activities both in and outside of the city. Unfortunately, rent is skyrocketing and traffic is getting worse." -Nolan B.
      • "People love living in Portland, which makes it a happy, fun environment. However, people love it so much that it’s crowded and expensive, too." -Chelsea C.
      • "I love how green and vibrant everything is, especially in the summer. I also like the laid-back atmosphere." -Ashley M.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.
      Read More

      Renter Confidence Survey

      Apartment List has released Portland’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Portland renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment Li...

      View full Portland Renter Survey

      Here’s how Portland ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      B+
      Safety and crime rate
      B-
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A-
      Recreational activities
      D
      Affordability
      B-
      Quality of schools
      B+
      Social Life
      C+
      Weather
      C
      Commute time
      B+
      State and local taxes
      A
      Public transit
      A
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Portland’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Portland renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Portland, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Portland include the following:

      • Portland renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Portland were pet-friendliness and public transit, which both received scores of A.
      • The areas of concern to Portland renters are affordability and commute time, which received D and C scores, respectively.
      • Portland millennials are moderately satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B.
      • Portland did relatively well compared to other Pacific Northwest cities like Spokane (C+) and Tacoma (C+), but earned lower marks than Seattle (B+) and Beaverton (B+).
      • Portland did relatively poorly compared to similar cities nationwide, including Austin (A-), Nashville (A-) and Boston (A).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "There are so many activities both in and outside of the city. Unfortunately, rent is skyrocketing and traffic is getting worse." -Nolan B.
      • "People love living in Portland, which makes it a happy, fun environment. However, people love it so much that it’s crowded and expensive, too." -Chelsea C.
      • "I love how green and vibrant everything is, especially in the summer. I also like the laid-back atmosphere." -Ashley M.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.