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210 Apartments for rent in Fremont, CA

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Last updated July 23 at 3:11PM
39034 Guardino Drive #305
Cherry-Guardino
Fremont, CA
Updated July 20 at 2:33PM
1 Bedroom
$2,000
3096 Middlefield Ave
Cameron Hills
Fremont, CA
Updated July 21 at 10:04AM
2 Bedrooms
$2,700
3662 Monmouth Pl
Grimmer
Fremont, CA
Updated July 22 at 9:52AM
3 Bedrooms
$3,100
3371 Baywood Terrace #311
Centerville
Fremont, CA
Updated July 19 at 10:10AM
1 Bedroom
$1,900
45424 Coyote Rd
Weibel
Fremont, CA
Updated July 18 at 6:55PM
4 Bedrooms
$3,800
40733 Laguna Place
Kimber-Gomes
Fremont, CA
Updated July 20 at 3:12PM
5 Bedrooms
$4,100
38046 Vallejo Street
Niles
Fremont, CA
Updated July 22 at 9:42AM
3 Bedrooms
$2,350
1440 Lemos Lane
Kimber-Gomes
Fremont, CA
Updated July 6 at 12:31PM
4 Bedrooms
$3,795
36992 Meadowbrook Common #103
Centerville
Fremont, CA
Updated July 22 at 9:46AM
2 Bedrooms
$2,500
43709 Abeloe Terrace
Mission San Jose
Fremont, CA
Updated July 20 at 2:33PM
3 Bedrooms
$3,200
960 JOSHUA
Vineyards-Avalon
Fremont, CA
Updated July 18 at 2:27AM
5 Bedrooms
$6,500
40510 Chapel Way 4
Irvington
Fremont, CA
Updated July 22 at 9:57AM
3 Bedrooms
$2,600
44886 Parkmeadow Dr
Weibel
Fremont, CA
Updated July 20 at 3:13PM
3 Bedrooms
$3,300
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City Guide
Fremont
Welcome to the “Bedroom City”! So you’re moving to Fremont, birthplace and the still sometimes home of the once great “rapper” and early-90s flashy pants wearing icon M.C. Hammer. Congratulations! Really, I mean it. Congratulations.

At this point I’m supposed to say a few things about some of the interesting things about our dear home and recommend fun activities to engage in once you’re here. Well, you’re moving to Fremont, and Fremont isn’t exactly New Orleans or San Diego in terms of fun and excitement. It’s Fremont, home of M.C. Hammer and … well … plenty of people who live in Fremont. Often referred to as “the bedroom city”, due to its large number of residents who simply live there – usually in expensive houses or pricey apartment complexes – but work and play in the nearby, and more expensive, cities of San Francisco and San Jose. That’s not to suggest that Fremont’s going to be a bad place to live. It's going to be a great one. The city offers an ethnically diverse community, easy access to the rest of the Bay Area and plenty of natural beauty. A “bedroom city” it may be, but if it’s where you’ll be spending the majority of your Fremont-based time, you might as well find yourself a sweet one.

Living in Fremont: The Good, the Not-so-Bad, and the Sort-of-Not-So-Great

Fremont’s known for having a number of nice neighborhoods, a variety of secure and attractive apartment complexes, some great natural scenery, plenty of ethnic diversity (including the highest concentrated Afghan population in the country and large Asian and Hispanic populations), and relatively easy highway, bus and train access to San Francisco, San Jose and the Silicon Valley. On the down side, Fremont, like the rest of the Bay Area, is also a very expensive place to live. Everything from apartment rental rates to groceries and utilities are quite pricey in Fremont, though not quite as expensive as they are in nearby San Francisco, Oakland or San Jose. Even during the winter a standard electric bill for a two bedroom apartment in Fremont can run you around $175-$225 a month. Also, Fremont has little in the way of local shopping, limited dining out options and some rather ugly traffic during rush hours.

Where to Live (and Where Not to Live) in Fremont

Finding an apartment in Fremont shouldn’t prove to be an incredibly difficult task. It’s the kind of city you can move to during pretty much any time of the year with relative ease and there’s no particular peak season when it’s especially easy or difficult to rent an apartment. However, do plan on paying a hefty monthly rent for a decent apartment. Expect to pay around $1500.00 to $1700.00 a month for a one bedroom apartment and at least $1750.00 for a quality two bedroom apartment. While these prices might seem high (which they are), keep in mind that most of the complexes also offer pool access, secure parking, on-site exercise facilities and security and the possibility of catching sight of and maybe making conversation with M.C. Hammer while you’re out shopping for groceries.

In terms of where to live in Fremont, it’s generally best to stick to the Niles District, the Bay Side District, the North Fremont District or the Central District. Many of the apartment complexes in the other districts – particularly the South Fremont District, the Warm Springs District and the Centerville District - are known for being over-priced. While you can get a one-bedroom for as low as $900 in those areas, the apartment complexes around there are notoriously rundown and poorly managed.

Tips and Tricks for Renting in Fremont

Using an apartment locating service is certainly recommended for finding an apartment in Fremont. While the service will cost you at least a hundred dollars, an apartment locating service will help you navigate the sometimes challenging process of applying for an apartment in a large complex and assist you with finding the perfect match for your lifestyle and income. When signing your lease, be prepared to put down first and last month’s rent, a $35.00 to $50.00 application fee, a security deposit that will equal a month of rent and, if you have pets, a $250.00 per pet (and that will be for a small pet, finding apartment housing if you have any dogs over 25 lbs. will be a bit more difficult, though some of the complexes will simply negotiate or require a higher pet deposit rate for larger animals) deposit before you sign your lease. Also, you’re going to need a few good past housing references and a fair to good credit history (or a cosigner with such) in order to lease an apartment in a decent complex or community. If you spend some time on Craigslist or other local online classifieds you might be able to find a less expensive and easier to obtain apartment or room in a large house or smaller apartment community. However, provided you can afford it, moving into one of the larger apartment complexes will probably be your best option. Be sure to secure your apartment at least a month or two before moving to the city. Many of the larger apartment complexes will take at least a week or two to process a lease agreement and another couple of weeks after that to assign and prepare your apartment.

So, once again, congratulations on your upcoming move to Fremont. If you happen to run into M.C. Hammer while you’re getting settled – we’re told he tends to spend his winters and summers in the Niles District area – feel free to tell him that some of us still remember that he is, indeed, “too legit to quit.”

Rent Report
Fremont

July 2017 Fremont Rent Report

Welcome to the July 2017 Fremont Rent Report. Fremont rents increased over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Fremont rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

Fremont rents increased significantly over the past month

Fremont rents have increased 0.6% over the past month, and are up slightly by 1.4% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Fremont stand at $2,820 for a one-bedroom apartment and $3,550 for a two-bedroom. This is the fourth straight month that the city has seen rent increases after a decline in February. Fremont's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 4.2%, as well as the national average of 2.9%.

Rents rising across the San Francisco Metro

Throughout the past year, rent increases have been occurring not just in the city of Fremont, but across the entire metro. Of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in the San Francisco metro, 9 of them have seen prices rise, and this trend can be seen throughout other areas in the state, as well. California as a whole has logged a 4.2% year-over-year growth. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro, as well as the rest of the state.

  • Concord has seen the fastest rent growth in the metro, with a year-over-year increase of 8.3%. The median two-bedroom there costs $3,000, while one-bedrooms go for $2,390.
  • Over the past year, San Francisco proper has seen the biggest rent drop in the metro, with decline of 0.6%. Median two-bedrooms there cost $3,040, while one-bedrooms go for $2,420.
  • San Mateo has the most expensive rents of the largest cities in the San Francisco metro, with a two-bedroom median of $4,330; rents grew 0.3% over the past month and 3.8% over the past year.
  • Oakland has the least expensive rents in the San Francisco metro, with a two-bedroom median of $2,150; rents were up 1.2% over the past month and 2.8% over the past year.
  • Looking throughout the rest of the state, San Jose is the most expensive of all California's major cities outside the San Francisco metro, with a median two-bedroom rent of $2,570; of the 10 largest California cities that we have data for, all have seen rents rise year-over-year, with Sacramento experiencing the fastest growth (+8.2%).
  • Sacramento, Santa Ana, and Fresno have all experienced year-over-year growth above the state average (8.2%, 6.4%, and 5.5%, respectively).

Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Fremont

Rent growth in Fremont has been relatively stable over the past year - some other large cities have seen more substantial increases, while in a few cases, rents have actually declined. Compared to most large cities across the country, Fremont is less affordable for renters.

  • Fremont's median two-bedroom rent of $3,550 is above the national average of $1,150. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.9% over the past year.
  • While rents in Fremont remained moderately stable this year, similar cities saw increases, including Seattle (+5.6%), Phoenix (+5.1%), Chicago (+4.8%); note that median 2BR rents in these cities go for $1,680, $1,020, and $1,290 respectively.
  • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Fremont than most large cities. Comparably, Phoenix has a median 2BR rent of $1,020, where Fremont is nearly three-and-a-half times that price.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.
City Median 1BR price Median 2BR price M/M price change Y/Y price change
San Francisco $2,420 $3,040 0.5% -0.6%
Oakland $1,710 $2,150 1.2% 2.8%
Fremont $2,820 $3,550 0.6% 1.4%
Concord $2,390 $3,000 0.7% 8.3%
Berkeley $2,230 $2,810 2.1% 3.0%
San Mateo $3,450 $4,330 0.3% 3.8%
Redwood City $2,720 $3,420 0.6% 2.8%
San Ramon $2,920 $3,670 1.2% 1.5%
Pleasanton $2,990 $3,760 1.5% 6.9%
Union City $2,690 $3,380 1.3% 2.8%
See more

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.