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150 apartments for rent near Chino, CA

Homecoming at The Preserve
16250 Homecoming Dr
Studio
Ask
1 Bed
$1,607
2 Bed
$2,110
13362 San Antonio Avenue
Chino
5 Bed
$3,100
6591 Palmer Street
Chino
5 Bed
$2,950
14211 WILLAMETTE Avenue
Chino
5 Bed
$3,000
8342 Pine Ave
Chino
3 Bed
$1,600
4627 Gettysburg Ave
Chino
3 Bed
$1,800
6864 Lacey Court
Chino
4 Bed
$2,395
Results within 1 miles of Chino, CA
Avalon Chino Hills
5685 Park Drive
1 Bed
$1,840
2 Bed
$2,195
3 Bed
Ask
Capriana at Chino Hills Apartments
16301 Butterfield Ranch Rd
1 Bed
$1,670
2 Bed
$1,980
Portofino
2851 Bedford Ln
1 Bed
$1,622
2 Bed
$1,721
3 Bed
Ask
14528 Viva Drive
Eastvale
5 Bed
$3,500
6851 Tourmaline Drive
Eastvale
4 Bed
$2,500
5042 Stone Ridge Drive
Chino Hills
5 Bed
$3,000
14322 English Setter Street
Eastvale
5 Bed
$3,200
4922 Stone Ridge Drive
Chino Hills
4 Bed
$2,650
4632 Torrey Pines Drive
Chino Hills
3 Bed
$3,085
4982 Agate Road
Chino Hills
4 Bed
$2,650
8684 Kendra Lane
Eastvale
4 Bed
$3,600
2866 Rolling Meadow Drive
Chino Hills
3 Bed
$2,250
6733 WHITE CLOVER Way
Eastvale
4 Bed
$2,595
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City Guide
Chino
Moving to Chino

With just over 77,000 living in roughly 30 square miles, theres no question that Chino residents have more elbow room than people in other places do. As most have come to expect from California weather, there’s no shortage of sunshine and clear days in this Mediterranean climate. With January’s average low of 38.3 degrees Fahrenheit and July’s average high of 91, the relatively low humidity means that your summers won’t be spent sweltering in the heat. Of course, the city's close proximity to the Pacific Ocean also helps. That being said, all great locations come at a price. What will it take to get an apartment in this place? How much is it going to cost? Heres the 411 on what you need to know moving to Chino.

Finding an Apartment

Contrary to popular belief, the city's motto of "Where Everything Grows" isn't just a nod toward Chinos agricultural history. As the community has grown, so has the average cost of rent. While homeowner vacancy rates are a hopeless 0.8%, future Chino residents might have better luck with the 3.2% rental vacancy rate. In any case, with the help of these tips you’ll have an easier time tipping the odds in your favor.

How much will it cost?

Chino’s rental prices are just slightly above California’s average rate. For those who balk at California's high rental costs, remember, and then constantly remind yourself when you pay rent, what you get for your money: sunshine, beautiful surroundings, and city conveniences.

When should you start looking?

Chino's rental market sees movement each year as the latest influx of young people floods the city for the semester. To that end, one approach to getting an apartment is to "beat the rush" by hunting during the summer.

Show them the money

Besides vigilance, the key to making your Chino apartment-hunting dreams come true is to be prepared from the get-go. In light of that pesky rental vacancy rate, you should come to apartment viewings with money. Reasonably-priced units get snapped up quickly around here. Since this city is very much a sellers market at the moment, it never hurts to have your references ready as well.

Neighborhoods in the City

Fun fact about Chino: although the city is built on the tract formerly known as Rancho Santa Ana del Chino, nobody can say for what the "Chino" part actually stands. Is it a reference to the grass? Was it someones name? Whatever it originally meant, the real meaning of the citys name has been muddled by history and the local neighborhoods are a reflection of that mix-up. On to the neighborhoods...

Chino Ave/San Antonio Ave: A popular spot in Chino, one of the perks of living in this neighborhood is that you can walk virtually anywhere. If you don't mind the commute when you're traveling further afield, units here are definitely worth looking into that is, if you can find a place available. The vacancy rate is a jaw-dropping 0%. Yes, you read that right.

E Riverside Dr/S. Archibald Ave: If Whispering Lakes Golf Course and Westwind Park weren't attractive enough, the higher vacancy rate in this neighborhood should be a strong selling point for prospective renters. There's a nice mixture of character homes and more modern ones are available.

Pipeline Ave/Riverside Dr: Got a sudden craving for Japanese food? Tired of spending several hours in the car each day? The commute in this area is so short you could throw a rock outside of these buildings and break a window in Chino Hills. If you can afford it, a Pipeline Avenue apartments well worth the price of admission.

Riverside Dr/Magnolia Ave: The rent in this area is very affordable by Chino’s standards. The only problem is the 0% vacancy rate. You'll have to move quickly if you find an apartment in this neighborhood.

Hellman Ave/Pine Ave: Flanked by golf courses, surrounded by parks, and within driving distance of Chaffey College, this neighborhood is filled with character homes. Between the unbelievable number of open apartments and the uncommonly low rent, you'll definitely want to take a tour before committing to any units.

Liberty St/Butterfield Pl: The rent is inexpensive, there are plenty of apartments, and the location isn't too bad for those who drive themselves to work. This is a spot that students, in particular, may have an interest in.

Phillips Blvd/Central Ave: When a trendy neighborhood is literally surrounded by amenities while offering diversity to both renters and homeowners, that’s typically an individual’s cue to come running whenever units become available. That is if your conscience will let you stay. The average rents so low here that you'll feel almost guilty.

Ramona Ave/Philadelphia St: This is yet another spot where the demand outstrips the supply and its easy to see why. The houses are established, most amenities are within walking distance, and the residents are a nice mix of families, students, and working professionals.

Whats it Like to Live in Chino?

When you look at how Chino has gone from an agricultural and dairy product-dominated economy to the thriving suburban city it’s become, it’s amazing how much a place can change over the course of several years. As evidenced by the dairies still situated here, however, it’s clear that this community hasn't discarded its roots altogether.

What to Do?

The first aviation museum is Planes of Fame. Featuring the largest Japanese aircraft collection in the world and boasting fairly recent renovations and additions, you won’t want to miss it. Chinos second air museum is Yanks Air Museum and it’s another sight you won’t want to miss. In addition, Prado Equestrian Center and Prado Regional Park offer more adventurous types an excellent opportunity to be active.

You know how real estate agents always zero in on location when they're advising buyers? From a vacationing standpoint, this whole city's a fantastic location. The stunning California beaches are a short drive from Chino while amusement parks like Scandia and the famed Disneyland are also less than an hours drive away.

Getting Around Town

The good news is that Amtrak stations are available near Chino in Ontario and Pomona. This might bode well for your inter-city travels, but won't solve the problem of your day-to-day needs.

Walking is as solid an option as any, provided that you're in the right neighborhood. Chino Avenue & San Antonio Avenue, for example, is touted as a walkable area. A few of the other neighborhoods? Not so much.

Driving is by far the most effective means of getting around in Chino. Some areas of the city will require more distance than others, but on the whole a car is a valuable commodity here. So much so that carpooling has really caught on in some circles.

It's easy to fall in love with this city. All of the neighborhoods have a unique flavor to them, there’s always something for you to do, and there’s plenty of local history to be enjoyed too. Put simply, Chino has a certain charm that you won't be able to get enough of.