Start your Thousand Oaks apartment search!
Select how many bedrooms you want.
S
Studio
1
Bed
2
Beds
3+
Beds

63 Apartments for rent in Thousand Oaks, CA

Read Guide >
Last updated August 23 at 10:09AM
1176 Amberton Lane
Rancho Conejo
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 21 at 10:36AM
3 Bedrooms
$3,100
1396 Ashton Park Lane
Rancho Conejo
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 4:21AM
3 Bedrooms
$3,100
2096 Mccrea Road
Lang Ranch
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 10:20AM
4 Bedrooms
$3,950
1520 Rugby Circle
Central Thousand Oaks
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 4:25AM
5 Bedrooms
$3,500
563 Rio Grande Circle
Wildwood
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 20 at 3:40AM
3 Bedrooms
$2,300
1101 Oak Mirage Place
North Ranch
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 23 at 3:22AM
8 Bedrooms
$35,000
257 Tennyson Street
Wildwood
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 19 at 11:02AM
3 Bedrooms
$3,100
1023 Cactus Court
Rancho Conejo
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 7 at 9:40AM
3 Bedrooms
$3,500
1719 Walker Cup Circle
North Ranch
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 19 at 2:30AM
2 Bedrooms
$4,000
104 Maegan Place
North Ranch
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 4:21AM
3 Bedrooms
$2,350
4258 Via Cerritos
Dos Vientos
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 5:11AM
5 Bedrooms
$4,500
477 Via Gregorio
Dos Vientos
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 4:21AM
4 Bedrooms
$3,950
290 Virgo Court
Wildwood
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 4:21AM
4 Bedrooms
$5,000
2828 CRESCENT Way
Westlake
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 15 at 5:27AM
2 Bedrooms
$3,000
387 Eric Place
North Ranch
Thousand Oaks, CA
Updated August 22 at 3:44AM
3 Bedrooms
$3,000
Apartment List detective logo

Keep Looking!

Try removing some filters or broadening your
search area to see more results.

Apartment List detective logo

Zoom in to see more.

Trying to get a feel for the larger area? No problem.
When you're ready, zoom in again to see pins and listings.

Apartment List sad heart

Something went wrong.

Please try your search again or reload the page.

City Guide
Thousand Oaks
The Master Plan

Unlike many Southern California communities, which grew and spread unchecked like wildfire throughout the decades, Thousand Oaks (along with neighbor Newbury Park) is a master planned city. What does this mean for Thousand Oaks residents? Well, for one, it means that once the city is officially full (which it now is – according to the almighty master plan), it cannot continue to spread outward. Hence, the never-ending sprawl, pollution, and congestion issues that plague so many other SoCal cities don’t affect Thousand Oaks. In fact, residents are able to enjoy more than 15,000 acres of nature reserves without having to worry about someone paving paradise and putting up a parking lot (sorry, Joni Mitchell, we couldn’t resist…)

A Thousand Reasons to Settle in Thousand Oaks

Actually, we only have a few reasons, but they might be worth a thousand. Thousand Oaks is undeniably one of California’s most visually stunning cities; an oak tree-lined Shangri-La that features both mountain and ocean views and rarely – if ever – climbs above 80 degrees or below 50. The city also boasts numerous parks, cycling paths, horse trails, hiking hotspots, beaches, and recreational centers. The nightlife scene is equally impressive, and you will have your pick of numerous art gallery/live music venues, wine, beer, and martini bars, and headliner-worthy comedy clubs.

Final Thoughts

Have we mentioned that we are just a touch envious of you at the moment? We did? Oh, well. We’re still envious, FYI. Seriously, though, we hope this info helps. Best of luck finding your dream dwellings in Thousand Oaks!

Rent Report
Thousand Oaks

August 2017 Thousand Oaks Rent Report

Welcome to the August 2017 Thousand Oaks Rent Report. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Thousand Oaks rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the state and nation.

Thousand Oaks rents increased moderately over the past month

Thousand Oaks rents have increased 0.3% over the past month, and are up sharply by 6.1% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Thousand Oaks stand at $2,010 for a one-bedroom apartment and $2,650 for a two-bedroom. This is the ninth straight month that the city has seen rent increases after a decline in October of last year. Thousand Oaks' year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of 4.2%, as well as the national average of 2.9%.

Rents rising across cities in California

Throughout the past year, rent increases have been occurring not just in the city of Thousand Oaks, but across the entire state. Of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in California, all of them have seen prices rise. California as a whole has logged a 4.2% year-over-year growth. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the state.

  • Looking throughout the rest of the state, San Francisco is the most expensive of all California's major cities outside the Oxnard metro, with a median two-bedroom rent of $3,060; of the 10 largest cities in the state that we have data for, San Francisco, is the only major city to see rents fall year-over-year (-0.0%).
  • Sacramento, Santa Ana, and Fresno have all experienced year-over-year growth above the state average (8.9%, 6.2%, and 6.1%, respectively).

Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Thousand Oaks

As rents have increased in Thousand Oaks, a few large cities nationwide have seen rents grow more modestly, or in some cases, even decline. Compared to most large cities across the country, Thousand Oaks is less affordable for renters.

  • Thousand Oaks' median two-bedroom rent of $2,650 is above the national average of $1,160. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.9% over the past year.
  • While Thousand Oaks' rents rose over the past year, some cities nationwide saw decreases, including Miami (-0.8%) and DC (-0.4%).
  • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Thousand Oaks than most large cities. Comparably, Detroit has a median 2BR rent of $880, where Thousand Oaks is more than three times that price.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.