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Last updated September 21 2020 at 1:42 PM

1177 Apartments for rent in Arlington, MA

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East Arlington
Arlington Heights
Arlington Center
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Check out 1177 verified apartments for rent in Arlington, MA with rents starting as low as $1450. Some apartments for rent in Arlington might offer rent specials. Look out for the
$
rent special icon!
$
Verified
1 Unit Available
Dudley Street
11 Dudley Street, Arlington, MA
Brattle
1 Bedroom
$1,725
700 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 01:39 PM
Located just off Massachusetts Avenue in bustling downtown Arlington, the residences at Dudley & Grove offer unique single-level living with private entrances and convenient on-site parking.
$
Verified
2 Units Available
385 Massachusetts Avenue Apartments
385 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, MA
Arlington Center
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$2,100
785 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated September 21 at 12:05 PM
A modern community with landscaped yard. Close to the area's universities, parks and entertainment areas. Each home offers a large balcony or patio, lots of natural sunlight and modern updates.
$
Verified
1 Unit Available
333 Massachusetts Avenue Apartments
333 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
1 Bedroom
$1,765
650 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 01:39 PM
With a location less than one mile from both Downtown Arlington and North Cambridge, the residences at 333 Massachusetts Avenue & 11 Allen Street offer urban convenience in an non-congested suburban setting.
Verified
8 Units Available
Arlington 360
4105 Symmes Cir, Arlington, MA
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$2,222
816 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,723
1218 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 12:42 PM
Steps from downtown Arlington, the community boasts gourmet kitchens, a gym with yoga studio, a pool and in-home laundry. The studio to three-bedroom apartments and townhomes are near Mystic Valley Parkway.
$
Verified
2 Units Available
898 Massachusetts Avenue Apartments
898 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, MA
Arlington Heights
1 Bedroom
$1,850
648 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 12:39 PM
This community is in the heart of downtown with the BMTA bus line just a block away. Homes feature wall-to-wall carpeting, modern appliances and tile bathrooms. On-site laundry and ample parking.
$
Verified
14 Units Available
Brattle Drive
12 Brattle Drive, Arlington, MA
Downtown Methuen
Studio
$1,475
374 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,750
589 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,150
3100 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 12:07 PM
A tranquil, suburban feel in the heart of the city. Homes include modern kitchens with dining areas, tiled bathrooms and wall-to-wall carpeting. On-site parking and laundry facility. Emergency maintenance available.
1 Unit Available
7 Brookdale Rd.
7 Brookdale Road, Arlington, MA
Arlington Center
2 Bedrooms
$2,400
1165 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Terms: One year lease
1 Unit Available
70 Amsden St.
70 Amsden Street, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
2 Bedrooms
$2,250
1125 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Terms: One year lease
1 Unit Available
17 Arizona Ter.
17 Arizona Terrace, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
1 Bedroom
$1,700
500 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Recently renovated, first floor one bedroom condo. New appliances refrigerator, dishwasher/disposal with a window unit AC.Two large closets, one assigned parking space, outdoor pool with coin operated Laundry on site.
1 Unit Available
40 Orvis Rd.
40 Orvis Road, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
1 Bedroom
$1,800
875 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Terms: One year lease
1 Unit Available
10 Appleton Pl.
10 Appleton Place, Arlington, MA
Brattle
4 Bedrooms
$3,100
1700 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Beautiful 4 Bedroom , plus a sun room on the second & third floor of a lovely multi- family home. The apartment is very spacious with beautiful hard wood floors through out.
1 Unit Available
290 Forest
290 Forest Street, Arlington, MA
Arlington Heights
3 Bedrooms
$2,950
1275 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
This is a cozy 3 bedroom 1.5 bath single-family home in Arlington's Turkey Hill area. The first floor features a three season sun porch/ mud room. The kitchen has newer appliances and plenty of cabinet space.
1 Unit Available
1140 Massachusetts
1140 Massachusetts Ave, Arlington, MA
Brattle
2 Bedrooms
$2,500
1150 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Gorgeous & all new renovation! Welcome home to this spacious second floor unit in a multi-family home.
1 Unit Available
11 Allen St.
11 Allen Street, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
1 Bedroom
$1,950
650 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
This generously-sized 1BR in professionally-managed building in convenient location in Arlington, just south of the center and 1 mile from Cambridge. AvailabLe SEPTEMBER 1ST.
1 Unit Available
8 Brattle Dr.
8 Brattle Drive, Arlington, MA
Brattle
1 Bedroom
$1,925
650 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
This generously-sized 1BR in professionally-managed building in quiet, yet convenient location in Arlington is available for an AUGUST OR 9/1 MOVE IN.
1 Unit Available
24 Newman Way
24 Newman Way, Arlington, MA
Arlington Center
3 Bedrooms
$3,000
1600 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Terms: One year lease
1 Unit Available
12 Ivy Cir.
12 Ivy Circle, Arlington, MA
Arlington Center
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$2,915
1059 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
NO FEE!!! MAY 1st.
1 Unit Available
80 Brattle Dr.
80 Brattle Drive, Arlington, MA
Brattle
1 Bedroom
$1,925
650 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Newly listed!!!! This generously-sized 1BR in professionally-managed building in quiet, yet convenient location in Arlington is available for an AUGUST OR 9/1 MOVE IN.
1 Unit Available
64 Morningside Dr.
64 Morningside Drive, Arlington, MA
Brattle
4 Bedrooms
$4,000
2400 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:04 PM
Terms: One year lease
1 Unit Available
12 Newland Rd
12 Newland Road, Arlington, MA
Arlington Heights
3 Bedrooms
$3,300
2000 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:00 PM
Come check out this beautifully updated two floor unit! With 3+ bedrooms and 2 bathrooms, this apartment is conveniently located; close to the Minuteman Bike Path and a few blocks from Arlington Heights.
1 Unit Available
129 Rawson Rd.
129 Rawson Road, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
3 Bedrooms
$2,400
1100 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:00 PM
Updated & Quiet W/NEWER Kitchen - Private Laundry in Unit - 2 Parking Great Location Equal Distance to Capitol Theater / Main Arlington Mass Ave.
1 Unit Available
64 Freeman St
64 Freeman Street, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
2 Bedrooms
$2,200
900 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:00 PM
Spacious and bright 2 bedroom apartment or one bedroom + option in East Arlington! Phenomenally located near the Capitol Theatre, Minuteman Bike Path, and less than one mile to Alewife! Enjoy a spacious living room with a big coat closet which flows
1 Unit Available
8 Henderson St
8 Henderson Street, Arlington, MA
East Arlington
2 Bedrooms
$2,000
1178 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 03:00 PM
Don't miss out on this spacious light and bright 2 bedroom, plus room for office/media room, 1st floor apartment. All newly painted, updated kitchen and bathroom. One parking space off street, any others must park on the street.
1 Unit Available
44 Fayette Street
44 Fayette Street, Arlington, MA
Arlington Heights
3 Bedrooms
$3,800
2100 sqft
Last updated September 21 at 02:45 PM
Vacant -Great Location Arlington heights- Large Fenced in Backyard- Pet friendly Updated 3+ br, charming single family house, 2 fireplaces, finished basement, Garage, Large backyard. Whole house was just painted.
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Find an apartment for rent in Arlington, MA

Searching for an apartment for rent in Arlington, MA? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 1177 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Arlington. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in Arlington is $1,187 for a studio, $1,354 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $1,680 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Arlington apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Arlington, MA apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Arlington?
In Arlington, the median rent is $1,187 for a studio, $1,354 for a 1-bedroom, $1,680 for a 2-bedroom, and $2,111 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Arlington, check out our monthly Arlington Rent Report.
How much is rent in Arlington?
In Arlington, the median rent is $1,187 for a studio, $1,354 for a 1-bedroom, $1,680 for a 2-bedroom, and $2,111 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Arlington, check out our monthly Arlington Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Arlington?
You can get the best deal by searching by apartments that are offering move-in specials in Arlington.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Arlington?
You can get the best deal by searching by apartments that are offering move-in specials in Arlington.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Arlington?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Arlington apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Arlington?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Arlington apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Arlington properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Arlington properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Arlington?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Arlington.
How much should I pay for rent in Arlington?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Arlington.
How can I find off-campus housing in Arlington?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Arlington. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Becker College, Hult International Business School, Berklee College of Music, Boston University, and Brandeis University.
How can I find off-campus housing in Arlington?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Arlington. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Becker College, Hult International Business School, Berklee College of Music, Boston University, and Brandeis University.

Median Rent in Arlington

Last updated Aug. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Arlington is $1,354, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,680.
Studio
$1,187
1 Bed
$1,354
2 Beds
$1,680
3+ Beds
$2,111
City GuideArlington
"And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property, I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company, I'm thankful for those thankful for the things I've done, I can rest in peace, I'm one of the chosen ones, I made it to Arlington." - (Trace Adkins, "Arlington")
"And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property, I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company, I'm thankful for those thankful for the things I've done, I can rest in peace, I'm one of the chosen ones, I made it to Arlington." - (Trace Adkins, "Arlington")

Long before Arlington would become a desireable suburb of Boston, it served as the hunting ground for the Massachusetts tribe, who called it "Menotomy", or "swift running water" due to its location near the Mystic River. The colonists, settled the area by 1635, making it one of the oldest continuously inhabited towns in the country. With its balmy summers, a location by the edge of the Massachusetts Bay, peaceful neighborhoods and rich history, it now serves as a retreat from the city for nearby Bostonians. Arlington is relatively exclusive, boasting a median household income nearly $20,000 higher than the state median for its 42,844 residents. A great urban-village lifestyle evokes Cambridge, which is probably why Bostonians flock to this town like flies to a honey factory explosion!

Having trouble with Craigslist Arlington? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

Moving to Arlington

Due to its prime location just six miles north of Boston, Arlington boasts exceptional connectivity with the entire eastern half of the United States. The I-93 S connects the town to Boston, and there’s even a metro line (Red Line) that’ll take you to Arlington from Park Street Station in Boston.

This being nearly Boston, where everything from gas stations to grocery stores try their darned best to make your wallet cry, expect renting to be a big drain on your expenses. With a median rent higher than the national average, getting a place here will cost you at least an arm, if not an arm and a leg. Of course, rental rates vary depending on the neighborhood which is one of the perks of living in a market economy. Stylish suburban single family homes by the Mystic Lake, for instance, will make you destitute (worth it, even if only to make everyone at Thanksgiving jealous). If you’d rather live in the bustle of the city where you can fall in love with some Harvard-going hipster-chick with nerd glasses and Pikachu t-shirts, you would want to move to Arlington Heights.

It’s not all as sad as the second half of A Walk to Remember though; there are some bright sparks about moving to Arlington as well. For one, the realty market is competitive, so expect professional, red-carpet treatment everywhere (as long as you got the dough, though). Second, most homes here are recently renovated, so you get swanky floors and brand new kitchen appliances that would make your mom really proud. Even the older homes that don’t have the new carpets and lighting fixtures, have something unique to offer a history older than the nation, a view thatll make your dates swoon, or a location just a long jog away from Boston. Plus, expect the people here to be Harvard-erudite, friendly, cultured and urbane, except that everyone sounds like Ben Affleck.

When to Start Looking

House hunting in Arlington is competitive. Expect to attack it with the ferociousness of a Flavor of Love contestant if you want a nice place. Being close to Cambridge, Arlington is the preferred haunt of Bostons scholars and post-graduates and college seniors. Which means come fall, finding a good apartment here is about as difficult as catching a flying pig slathered in Vaseline. Youll have a much better shot at getting a place in winter or spring, when your competition is either stuck in a blizzard, or getting drunk in Cancun. Even then, it is recommended that you give yourself a head start of at least a month.

Things You’ll Need

Arlington is an expensive city in which to buy a home, which probably explains why 40% of all the city’s homes are occupied by renters. As such, the city is pretty renter-friendly. This doesnt mean you can waltz in without any identity or income proof and tap dance your way out with the apartment keys. You’ll have to check all the right boxes proof of income and credit history to get a place in the city. Arlington landlords like to see how you roll; plopping a thick wad of cash for the security deposit on the table right after the handshake will show them that you are a real player. Not looking like a hobo in clothes thrifted from your grandfather’s wardrobe (were looking at you, hipsters, and Macklemore) will help as well. And like everything else everywhere else, you get brownie points if you can use the name Harvard or MIT anywhere in your rental application.

Moving to Arlington
+

Due to its prime location just six miles north of Boston, Arlington boasts exceptional connectivity with the entire eastern half of the United States. The I-93 S connects the town to Boston, and there’s even a metro line (Red Line) that’ll take you to Arlington from Park Street Station in Boston.

This being nearly Boston, where everything from gas stations to grocery stores try their darned best to make your wallet cry, expect renting to be a big drain on your expenses. With a median rent higher than the national average, getting a place here will cost you at least an arm, if not an arm and a leg. Of course, rental rates vary depending on the neighborhood which is one of the perks of living in a market economy. Stylish suburban single family homes by the Mystic Lake, for instance, will make you destitute (worth it, even if only to make everyone at Thanksgiving jealous). If you’d rather live in the bustle of the city where you can fall in love with some Harvard-going hipster-chick with nerd glasses and Pikachu t-shirts, you would want to move to Arlington Heights.

It’s not all as sad as the second half of A Walk to Remember though; there are some bright sparks about moving to Arlington as well. For one, the realty market is competitive, so expect professional, red-carpet treatment everywhere (as long as you got the dough, though). Second, most homes here are recently renovated, so you get swanky floors and brand new kitchen appliances that would make your mom really proud. Even the older homes that don’t have the new carpets and lighting fixtures, have something unique to offer a history older than the nation, a view thatll make your dates swoon, or a location just a long jog away from Boston. Plus, expect the people here to be Harvard-erudite, friendly, cultured and urbane, except that everyone sounds like Ben Affleck.

When to Start Looking

House hunting in Arlington is competitive. Expect to attack it with the ferociousness of a Flavor of Love contestant if you want a nice place. Being close to Cambridge, Arlington is the preferred haunt of Bostons scholars and post-graduates and college seniors. Which means come fall, finding a good apartment here is about as difficult as catching a flying pig slathered in Vaseline. Youll have a much better shot at getting a place in winter or spring, when your competition is either stuck in a blizzard, or getting drunk in Cancun. Even then, it is recommended that you give yourself a head start of at least a month.

Things You’ll Need

Arlington is an expensive city in which to buy a home, which probably explains why 40% of all the city’s homes are occupied by renters. As such, the city is pretty renter-friendly. This doesnt mean you can waltz in without any identity or income proof and tap dance your way out with the apartment keys. You’ll have to check all the right boxes proof of income and credit history to get a place in the city. Arlington landlords like to see how you roll; plopping a thick wad of cash for the security deposit on the table right after the handshake will show them that you are a real player. Not looking like a hobo in clothes thrifted from your grandfather’s wardrobe (were looking at you, hipsters, and Macklemore) will help as well. And like everything else everywhere else, you get brownie points if you can use the name Harvard or MIT anywhere in your rental application.

Arlington Neighborhoods

Arlington begins where Boston ends, but because no one really knows where Boston really ends, you can be forgiven for believing you are in Boston when you are in Arlington, and vice-versa. Which sounds almost like cheating, but Arlington still has its very own Arlington-y neighborhoods to choose from, such as:

Arlington Heights: This is the neighborhood Silicon Valley veterans who hate sunshine and warm weather dream of settling in. Nearly 16.1% of all residents here are engaged in computer/mathematical occupations, thanks to nearby MIT and Harvard. And since they all have more money than Mr. Deeds, home prices here can get real high. On the plus side, all homes are ancient, and there are plenty of chic restaurants favored by Harvard educated English and Art majors.

Arlington Center: Arlington Center is the (drumroll) center of Arlington. It’s the favorite hangout spot for students and young professionals. Which means that home prices here won’t make you wish you’d taken that stable, well-paying job instead of backpacking through Europe.

Arlington Historic Center: Arlington Historic Center has more history per square inch than the whole state of California combined. Homes here are not merely historic; they are ancient (and full of character). Like the rest of Arlington, prices aren’t inexpensive, but at least you won’t have to do a Walter White to pay for a home here.

Orivs Road: Teensy weensy Orvis road neighborhood is the place where students who don’t have trust funds and scholarships crash. Which means the place has plenty of character (and characters). Which also means that home prices here won’t poke you in the eye, kick you in the shins and make fun of the balance in your bank account.

Kensington Park: Kensington Park is the place you’d want to move when people start using the word "distinguished" to describe you. This is Arlington’s upper-class neighborhood of imposing brick homes, leafy parks, and well-manicured lawns.

East Arlington: East Arlington is where Arlington merges with Boston’s hoi polloi. In recent years, the neighborhood has been completely taken over by students, which means lower rent and even more inexpensive dining options. Great place to move in if you are young, willing to thrift, and like crashing Ivy-League parties.

Arlington Neighborhoods
+

Arlington begins where Boston ends, but because no one really knows where Boston really ends, you can be forgiven for believing you are in Boston when you are in Arlington, and vice-versa. Which sounds almost like cheating, but Arlington still has its very own Arlington-y neighborhoods to choose from, such as:

Arlington Heights: This is the neighborhood Silicon Valley veterans who hate sunshine and warm weather dream of settling in. Nearly 16.1% of all residents here are engaged in computer/mathematical occupations, thanks to nearby MIT and Harvard. And since they all have more money than Mr. Deeds, home prices here can get real high. On the plus side, all homes are ancient, and there are plenty of chic restaurants favored by Harvard educated English and Art majors.

Arlington Center: Arlington Center is the (drumroll) center of Arlington. It’s the favorite hangout spot for students and young professionals. Which means that home prices here won’t make you wish you’d taken that stable, well-paying job instead of backpacking through Europe.

Arlington Historic Center: Arlington Historic Center has more history per square inch than the whole state of California combined. Homes here are not merely historic; they are ancient (and full of character). Like the rest of Arlington, prices aren’t inexpensive, but at least you won’t have to do a Walter White to pay for a home here.

Orivs Road: Teensy weensy Orvis road neighborhood is the place where students who don’t have trust funds and scholarships crash. Which means the place has plenty of character (and characters). Which also means that home prices here won’t poke you in the eye, kick you in the shins and make fun of the balance in your bank account.

Kensington Park: Kensington Park is the place you’d want to move when people start using the word "distinguished" to describe you. This is Arlington’s upper-class neighborhood of imposing brick homes, leafy parks, and well-manicured lawns.

East Arlington: East Arlington is where Arlington merges with Boston’s hoi polloi. In recent years, the neighborhood has been completely taken over by students, which means lower rent and even more inexpensive dining options. Great place to move in if you are young, willing to thrift, and like crashing Ivy-League parties.

Living in Arlington

Cambridge, right next to Arlington, has two of the country’s best educational institutions, Harvard and MIT. Which means plenty of students call Arlington home, particularly the eastern half of the city.Getting into Boston is easy, thanks to the Red Line subway which runs from Alewife to downtown. Theres also a bus service that’ll take you through Harvard Square which is popular with local students. P.S.: Boston’s MBTA is the oldest subway system in the country, and the fifth largest by number of passengers.

Cambridge is half an hour walk (yes, walk) away from Arlington Center and East Arlington. Whats in Cambridge, you ask? Well, just some of the best restaurants, pubs, museums, performing centers and libraries in the country for starters.Cambridge, just a few miles to the southeast, has more off-beat restaurants than hipsterhood central, Williamsburg, NYC itself. Chalk it up to local students who are more than happy to experiment with fava-bean stuffed pita-roti burrito curry at that new Thai-Mexican-Indian fusion place.Arlington and nearby Cambridge have a pub culture that would make an Irishman proud. There are the dive bars favored by locals, the pubs loved by Harvard’s intellectuals, and the upscale lounges where executives from Boston’s financial district crash.NNNNNN

Living in Arlington
+

Cambridge, right next to Arlington, has two of the country’s best educational institutions, Harvard and MIT. Which means plenty of students call Arlington home, particularly the eastern half of the city.Getting into Boston is easy, thanks to the Red Line subway which runs from Alewife to downtown. Theres also a bus service that’ll take you through Harvard Square which is popular with local students. P.S.: Boston’s MBTA is the oldest subway system in the country, and the fifth largest by number of passengers.

Cambridge is half an hour walk (yes, walk) away from Arlington Center and East Arlington. Whats in Cambridge, you ask? Well, just some of the best restaurants, pubs, museums, performing centers and libraries in the country for starters.Cambridge, just a few miles to the southeast, has more off-beat restaurants than hipsterhood central, Williamsburg, NYC itself. Chalk it up to local students who are more than happy to experiment with fava-bean stuffed pita-roti burrito curry at that new Thai-Mexican-Indian fusion place.Arlington and nearby Cambridge have a pub culture that would make an Irishman proud. There are the dive bars favored by locals, the pubs loved by Harvard’s intellectuals, and the upscale lounges where executives from Boston’s financial district crash.NNNNNN

Read More
City GuideArlington
"And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property, I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company, I'm thankful for those thankful for the things I've done, I can rest in peace, I'm one of the chosen ones, I made it to Arlington." - (Trace Adkins, "Arlington")
"And I'm proud to be on this peaceful piece of property, I'm on sacred ground and I'm in the best of company, I'm thankful for those thankful for the things I've done, I can rest in peace, I'm one of the chosen ones, I made it to Arlington." - (Trace Adkins, "Arlington")

Long before Arlington would become a desireable suburb of Boston, it served as the hunting ground for the Massachusetts tribe, who called it "Menotomy", or "swift running water" due to its location near the Mystic River. The colonists, settled the area by 1635, making it one of the oldest continuously inhabited towns in the country. With its balmy summers, a location by the edge of the Massachusetts Bay, peaceful neighborhoods and rich history, it now serves as a retreat from the city for nearby Bostonians. Arlington is relatively exclusive, boasting a median household income nearly $20,000 higher than the state median for its 42,844 residents. A great urban-village lifestyle evokes Cambridge, which is probably why Bostonians flock to this town like flies to a honey factory explosion!

Having trouble with Craigslist Arlington? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Zillow? Apartment List is here to help!

Moving to Arlington

Due to its prime location just six miles north of Boston, Arlington boasts exceptional connectivity with the entire eastern half of the United States. The I-93 S connects the town to Boston, and there’s even a metro line (Red Line) that’ll take you to Arlington from Park Street Station in Boston.

This being nearly Boston, where everything from gas stations to grocery stores try their darned best to make your wallet cry, expect renting to be a big drain on your expenses. With a median rent higher than the national average, getting a place here will cost you at least an arm, if not an arm and a leg. Of course, rental rates vary depending on the neighborhood which is one of the perks of living in a market economy. Stylish suburban single family homes by the Mystic Lake, for instance, will make you destitute (worth it, even if only to make everyone at Thanksgiving jealous). If you’d rather live in the bustle of the city where you can fall in love with some Harvard-going hipster-chick with nerd glasses and Pikachu t-shirts, you would want to move to Arlington Heights.

It’s not all as sad as the second half of A Walk to Remember though; there are some bright sparks about moving to Arlington as well. For one, the realty market is competitive, so expect professional, red-carpet treatment everywhere (as long as you got the dough, though). Second, most homes here are recently renovated, so you get swanky floors and brand new kitchen appliances that would make your mom really proud. Even the older homes that don’t have the new carpets and lighting fixtures, have something unique to offer a history older than the nation, a view thatll make your dates swoon, or a location just a long jog away from Boston. Plus, expect the people here to be Harvard-erudite, friendly, cultured and urbane, except that everyone sounds like Ben Affleck.

When to Start Looking

House hunting in Arlington is competitive. Expect to attack it with the ferociousness of a Flavor of Love contestant if you want a nice place. Being close to Cambridge, Arlington is the preferred haunt of Bostons scholars and post-graduates and college seniors. Which means come fall, finding a good apartment here is about as difficult as catching a flying pig slathered in Vaseline. Youll have a much better shot at getting a place in winter or spring, when your competition is either stuck in a blizzard, or getting drunk in Cancun. Even then, it is recommended that you give yourself a head start of at least a month.

Things You’ll Need

Arlington is an expensive city in which to buy a home, which probably explains why 40% of all the city’s homes are occupied by renters. As such, the city is pretty renter-friendly. This doesnt mean you can waltz in without any identity or income proof and tap dance your way out with the apartment keys. You’ll have to check all the right boxes proof of income and credit history to get a place in the city. Arlington landlords like to see how you roll; plopping a thick wad of cash for the security deposit on the table right after the handshake will show them that you are a real player. Not looking like a hobo in clothes thrifted from your grandfather’s wardrobe (were looking at you, hipsters, and Macklemore) will help as well. And like everything else everywhere else, you get brownie points if you can use the name Harvard or MIT anywhere in your rental application.

Moving to Arlington
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Due to its prime location just six miles north of Boston, Arlington boasts exceptional connectivity with the entire eastern half of the United States. The I-93 S connects the town to Boston, and there’s even a metro line (Red Line) that’ll take you to Arlington from Park Street Station in Boston.

This being nearly Boston, where everything from gas stations to grocery stores try their darned best to make your wallet cry, expect renting to be a big drain on your expenses. With a median rent higher than the national average, getting a place here will cost you at least an arm, if not an arm and a leg. Of course, rental rates vary depending on the neighborhood which is one of the perks of living in a market economy. Stylish suburban single family homes by the Mystic Lake, for instance, will make you destitute (worth it, even if only to make everyone at Thanksgiving jealous). If you’d rather live in the bustle of the city where you can fall in love with some Harvard-going hipster-chick with nerd glasses and Pikachu t-shirts, you would want to move to Arlington Heights.

It’s not all as sad as the second half of A Walk to Remember though; there are some bright sparks about moving to Arlington as well. For one, the realty market is competitive, so expect professional, red-carpet treatment everywhere (as long as you got the dough, though). Second, most homes here are recently renovated, so you get swanky floors and brand new kitchen appliances that would make your mom really proud. Even the older homes that don’t have the new carpets and lighting fixtures, have something unique to offer a history older than the nation, a view thatll make your dates swoon, or a location just a long jog away from Boston. Plus, expect the people here to be Harvard-erudite, friendly, cultured and urbane, except that everyone sounds like Ben Affleck.

When to Start Looking

House hunting in Arlington is competitive. Expect to attack it with the ferociousness of a Flavor of Love contestant if you want a nice place. Being close to Cambridge, Arlington is the preferred haunt of Bostons scholars and post-graduates and college seniors. Which means come fall, finding a good apartment here is about as difficult as catching a flying pig slathered in Vaseline. Youll have a much better shot at getting a place in winter or spring, when your competition is either stuck in a blizzard, or getting drunk in Cancun. Even then, it is recommended that you give yourself a head start of at least a month.

Things You’ll Need

Arlington is an expensive city in which to buy a home, which probably explains why 40% of all the city’s homes are occupied by renters. As such, the city is pretty renter-friendly. This doesnt mean you can waltz in without any identity or income proof and tap dance your way out with the apartment keys. You’ll have to check all the right boxes proof of income and credit history to get a place in the city. Arlington landlords like to see how you roll; plopping a thick wad of cash for the security deposit on the table right after the handshake will show them that you are a real player. Not looking like a hobo in clothes thrifted from your grandfather’s wardrobe (were looking at you, hipsters, and Macklemore) will help as well. And like everything else everywhere else, you get brownie points if you can use the name Harvard or MIT anywhere in your rental application.

Arlington Neighborhoods

Arlington begins where Boston ends, but because no one really knows where Boston really ends, you can be forgiven for believing you are in Boston when you are in Arlington, and vice-versa. Which sounds almost like cheating, but Arlington still has its very own Arlington-y neighborhoods to choose from, such as:

Arlington Heights: This is the neighborhood Silicon Valley veterans who hate sunshine and warm weather dream of settling in. Nearly 16.1% of all residents here are engaged in computer/mathematical occupations, thanks to nearby MIT and Harvard. And since they all have more money than Mr. Deeds, home prices here can get real high. On the plus side, all homes are ancient, and there are plenty of chic restaurants favored by Harvard educated English and Art majors.

Arlington Center: Arlington Center is the (drumroll) center of Arlington. It’s the favorite hangout spot for students and young professionals. Which means that home prices here won’t make you wish you’d taken that stable, well-paying job instead of backpacking through Europe.

Arlington Historic Center: Arlington Historic Center has more history per square inch than the whole state of California combined. Homes here are not merely historic; they are ancient (and full of character). Like the rest of Arlington, prices aren’t inexpensive, but at least you won’t have to do a Walter White to pay for a home here.

Orivs Road: Teensy weensy Orvis road neighborhood is the place where students who don’t have trust funds and scholarships crash. Which means the place has plenty of character (and characters). Which also means that home prices here won’t poke you in the eye, kick you in the shins and make fun of the balance in your bank account.

Kensington Park: Kensington Park is the place you’d want to move when people start using the word "distinguished" to describe you. This is Arlington’s upper-class neighborhood of imposing brick homes, leafy parks, and well-manicured lawns.

East Arlington: East Arlington is where Arlington merges with Boston’s hoi polloi. In recent years, the neighborhood has been completely taken over by students, which means lower rent and even more inexpensive dining options. Great place to move in if you are young, willing to thrift, and like crashing Ivy-League parties.

Arlington Neighborhoods
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Arlington begins where Boston ends, but because no one really knows where Boston really ends, you can be forgiven for believing you are in Boston when you are in Arlington, and vice-versa. Which sounds almost like cheating, but Arlington still has its very own Arlington-y neighborhoods to choose from, such as:

Arlington Heights: This is the neighborhood Silicon Valley veterans who hate sunshine and warm weather dream of settling in. Nearly 16.1% of all residents here are engaged in computer/mathematical occupations, thanks to nearby MIT and Harvard. And since they all have more money than Mr. Deeds, home prices here can get real high. On the plus side, all homes are ancient, and there are plenty of chic restaurants favored by Harvard educated English and Art majors.

Arlington Center: Arlington Center is the (drumroll) center of Arlington. It’s the favorite hangout spot for students and young professionals. Which means that home prices here won’t make you wish you’d taken that stable, well-paying job instead of backpacking through Europe.

Arlington Historic Center: Arlington Historic Center has more history per square inch than the whole state of California combined. Homes here are not merely historic; they are ancient (and full of character). Like the rest of Arlington, prices aren’t inexpensive, but at least you won’t have to do a Walter White to pay for a home here.

Orivs Road: Teensy weensy Orvis road neighborhood is the place where students who don’t have trust funds and scholarships crash. Which means the place has plenty of character (and characters). Which also means that home prices here won’t poke you in the eye, kick you in the shins and make fun of the balance in your bank account.

Kensington Park: Kensington Park is the place you’d want to move when people start using the word "distinguished" to describe you. This is Arlington’s upper-class neighborhood of imposing brick homes, leafy parks, and well-manicured lawns.

East Arlington: East Arlington is where Arlington merges with Boston’s hoi polloi. In recent years, the neighborhood has been completely taken over by students, which means lower rent and even more inexpensive dining options. Great place to move in if you are young, willing to thrift, and like crashing Ivy-League parties.

Living in Arlington

Cambridge, right next to Arlington, has two of the country’s best educational institutions, Harvard and MIT. Which means plenty of students call Arlington home, particularly the eastern half of the city.Getting into Boston is easy, thanks to the Red Line subway which runs from Alewife to downtown. Theres also a bus service that’ll take you through Harvard Square which is popular with local students. P.S.: Boston’s MBTA is the oldest subway system in the country, and the fifth largest by number of passengers.

Cambridge is half an hour walk (yes, walk) away from Arlington Center and East Arlington. Whats in Cambridge, you ask? Well, just some of the best restaurants, pubs, museums, performing centers and libraries in the country for starters.Cambridge, just a few miles to the southeast, has more off-beat restaurants than hipsterhood central, Williamsburg, NYC itself. Chalk it up to local students who are more than happy to experiment with fava-bean stuffed pita-roti burrito curry at that new Thai-Mexican-Indian fusion place.Arlington and nearby Cambridge have a pub culture that would make an Irishman proud. There are the dive bars favored by locals, the pubs loved by Harvard’s intellectuals, and the upscale lounges where executives from Boston’s financial district crash.NNNNNN

Living in Arlington
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Cambridge, right next to Arlington, has two of the country’s best educational institutions, Harvard and MIT. Which means plenty of students call Arlington home, particularly the eastern half of the city.Getting into Boston is easy, thanks to the Red Line subway which runs from Alewife to downtown. Theres also a bus service that’ll take you through Harvard Square which is popular with local students. P.S.: Boston’s MBTA is the oldest subway system in the country, and the fifth largest by number of passengers.

Cambridge is half an hour walk (yes, walk) away from Arlington Center and East Arlington. Whats in Cambridge, you ask? Well, just some of the best restaurants, pubs, museums, performing centers and libraries in the country for starters.Cambridge, just a few miles to the southeast, has more off-beat restaurants than hipsterhood central, Williamsburg, NYC itself. Chalk it up to local students who are more than happy to experiment with fava-bean stuffed pita-roti burrito curry at that new Thai-Mexican-Indian fusion place.Arlington and nearby Cambridge have a pub culture that would make an Irishman proud. There are the dive bars favored by locals, the pubs loved by Harvard’s intellectuals, and the upscale lounges where executives from Boston’s financial district crash.NNNNNN

Rent Report
Arlington

September 2020 Arlington Rent Report

Welcome to the September 2020 Arlington Rent Report. Arlington rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Arlington rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the state and nation.

Arlington rents decline sharply over the past month

Arlington rents have declined 0.8% over the past month, but have increased marginally by 0.9% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Arlington stand at $1,355 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,680 for a two-bedroom. This is the third straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in May. Arlington's year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of -1.5%, as well as the national average of 0.3%.

    Rents falling across cities in Massachusetts

    While rent prices have increased in Arlington over the past year, other cities across the state are seeing the opposite trend. Rents have fallen in 1 of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in Massachusetts. The state as a whole logged rent growth of -1.5% over the past year. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the state.

    • Looking throughout the state, Newton is the most expensive of all Massachusetts' major cities, with a median two-bedroom rent of $2,227; of the 10 largest Massachusetts cities that we have data for, 6 have seen rents fall year-over-year, with Cambridge experiencing the fastest decline (-4.2%).
    • Lawrence, Worcester, and Fall River have all experienced year-over-year growth above the state average (2.9%, 2.0%, and 0.6%, respectively).

    Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Arlington

    As rents have increased marginally in Arlington, other large cities nationwide have seen rents grow more quickly. Compared to most large cities across the country, Arlington is less affordable for renters.

    • Arlington's median two-bedroom rent of $1,680 is above the national average of $1,195. Nationwide, rents have held steady over the past year.
    • While Arlington's rents rose marginally over the past year, some cities nationwide saw increases as well, including Phoenix (+1.7%) and Detroit (+0.8%).
    • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Arlington than most large cities. For example, Detroit has a median 2BR rent of $902, where Arlington is more than one-and-a-half times that price.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology here.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    September 2020 Arlington Rent Report

    Welcome to the September 2020 Arlington Rent Report. Arlington rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Arlington rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the state and nation.

    View full Rent Report

    September 2020 Arlington Rent Report

    Welcome to the September 2020 Arlington Rent Report. Arlington rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Arlington rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the state and nation.

    Arlington rents decline sharply over the past month

    Arlington rents have declined 0.8% over the past month, but have increased marginally by 0.9% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Arlington stand at $1,355 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,680 for a two-bedroom. This is the third straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in May. Arlington's year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of -1.5%, as well as the national average of 0.3%.

      Rents falling across cities in Massachusetts

      While rent prices have increased in Arlington over the past year, other cities across the state are seeing the opposite trend. Rents have fallen in 1 of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in Massachusetts. The state as a whole logged rent growth of -1.5% over the past year. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the state.

      • Looking throughout the state, Newton is the most expensive of all Massachusetts' major cities, with a median two-bedroom rent of $2,227; of the 10 largest Massachusetts cities that we have data for, 6 have seen rents fall year-over-year, with Cambridge experiencing the fastest decline (-4.2%).
      • Lawrence, Worcester, and Fall River have all experienced year-over-year growth above the state average (2.9%, 2.0%, and 0.6%, respectively).

      Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Arlington

      As rents have increased marginally in Arlington, other large cities nationwide have seen rents grow more quickly. Compared to most large cities across the country, Arlington is less affordable for renters.

      • Arlington's median two-bedroom rent of $1,680 is above the national average of $1,195. Nationwide, rents have held steady over the past year.
      • While Arlington's rents rose marginally over the past year, some cities nationwide saw increases as well, including Phoenix (+1.7%) and Detroit (+0.8%).
      • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Arlington than most large cities. For example, Detroit has a median 2BR rent of $902, where Arlington is more than one-and-a-half times that price.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology here.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.