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Last updated September 17 2020 at 3:57 PM

385 Apartments for rent in New Orleans, LA

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Mid City
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French Quarter
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Check out 385 verified apartments for rent in New Orleans, LA with rents starting as low as $500. Some apartments for rent in New Orleans might offer rent specials. Look out for the
$
rent special icon!
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:43 PM
183 Units Available
Central Business District
Canal 1535
1535 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,574
819 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,691
1263 sqft
ESTABLISH YOURSELF IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANACanal1535 apartments place you in New Orleans’ cultural center. Explore the culinary creations that line Canal Street or listen to the smooth sounds that make this city a music destination.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
23 Units Available
Central Business District
Gravier Place
837 Gravier St, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,005
500 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,590
914 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,084
1503 sqft
Near Duncan Plaza and two blocks from historic Bourbon Street. Apartments offer hardwood floors, granite countertops and walk-in closets. Available furnished. The community offers a rooftop pool, a gym and a clubhouse. Pet-friendly.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
$
18 Units Available
Central Business District
The Strand
909 Gravier St, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,505
573 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,842
1352 sqft
Downtown apartments in a high-rise that overlooks New Orleans' Central Business District. Units have walk-in closets and microwaves. Complimentary valet parking, gym and media room. Close to the French Quarter and Mississippi River.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
16 Units Available
French Quarter
DH Holmes
810 Bienville St, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,299
520 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,598
821 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,350
1371 sqft
French Quarter living in pet-friendly building with a rooftop pool. Apartments feature hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances, bathtubs, washers and dryers, and complimentary cable. Round-the-clock maintenance. E-payments accepted. New Orleans Jazz Historical Park nearby.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
15 Units Available
Central Business District
Hibernia Tower
812 Gravier St, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,295
600 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,008
956 sqft
Just a few blocks from the Mississippi River and Highway 39. Luxury homes have stainless steel kitchen appliances, furniture, a bathtub and hardwood flooring. Resident amenities include a pool, a clubhouse and a gym.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
21 Units Available
Gert Town
Parkway
4650 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,268
751 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,796
1027 sqft
Brand New! Parkway Apartments offers modern, luxury residences, centrally located in New Orleans. Unmatched finishes including Italian cabinets, LED mirrors, and custom light fixtures.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
$
64 Units Available
Lower Garden District
The Saulet
1420 Annunciation St, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,190
828 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,580
1243 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,170
1370 sqft
Excellent location close to the world-famous restaurants and shops of Magazine Street. Units feature air conditioning, garbage disposal, hardwood floors and walk-in closets. Community has pool, yoga, parking and gym.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
34 Units Available
Central Business District
Four Winds 210 Baronne St
210 Baronne St, New Orleans, LA
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,455
817 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,395
1541 sqft
Four Winds sets a new standard for luxury apartment living in New Orleans. Welcome Home!
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:42 PM
41 Units Available
Bayou St. John
The Esplanade at City Park Apartments
3443 Esplanade Ave, New Orleans, LA
Studio
$1,050
510 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,145
730 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,565
1094 sqft
Minutes from Downtown Tulsa near River Parks and the Brookside shopping district. Pool with sundeck, well-equipped fitness center, basketball and volleyball courts, and a picnic area for residents.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:39 PM
$
94 Units Available
Tulane - Gravier
2424 Tulane
2424 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,305
668 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,705
951 sqft
Virtual tours and online leasing available! Contact our team by phone or email today. Live life the way you want it: vibrant, active, social and filled with experiences.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 03:39 PM
$
26 Units Available
Mid-City
Lumina
3701 Conti Street, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,237
678 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,095
1082 sqft
We are now accepting in-person tours via scheduled appointments only. Our virtual tours are also available. Please schedule yours today. Virtual tours are available. Call us today for more information! Welcome Home to Lumina
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:01 PM
$
9 Units Available
Bywater
Rice Mill Lofts
522 Montegut Street, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,500
1070 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,400
1425 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
The Rice Mill Lofts was created from a strong idea of great beauty and great meaning. This is a building of breathtaking originality.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:39 PM
24 Units Available
Old Aurora
The Mayfair Apartment Homes
4254 Maple Leaf Dr, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,165
803 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,095
1117 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,190
1505 sqft
Set in one of the oldest neighborhoods in New Orleans, The Mayfair Apartment Homes are your home for Southern luxury.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:28 PM
$
1 Unit Available
St. Thomas Development Neighborhood
Josephine Lofts
427 Jackson Avenue, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$2,175
1145 sqft
Josephine Lofts is located in the heart of New Orleans in the coveted Lower Garden district.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:23 PM
5 Units Available
Little Woods
Willowbrook Apartments
7001 Bundy Rd, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$675
658 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$795
958 sqft
1 and 2 bedroom apartments, washer/ dryer hook ups in the 2 bedroom aprtments, 3 laundry rooms on the property, 24 hour security, fully gated community, totally electric kitchen (stove, refrigerator and dishwasher), central air and heat we pay water
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:11 PM
34 Units Available
French Quarter
THE ANNEX
939 Iberville Street, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,895
973 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,650
1378 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$3,550
1764 sqft
All that was, is new again. What first emerged nearly a century ago rises again for an encore, bestowing a rare echelon of New Orleans lifestyle that can only be described as French Quarter luxe.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:11 PM
15 Units Available
Central Business District
1201 Canal
1201 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA
Studio
$1,350
542 sqft
Experience the comfort and luxury of living in downtown New Orleans.
Verified
Last updated September 17 at 12:07 PM
8 Units Available
Mid-City
American Can
3700 Orleans Ave, New Orleans, LA
1 Bedroom
$1,390
860 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,665
1276 sqft
Find studio, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments for rent at American Can in New Orleans. View photos, descriptions and more!
Last updated September 17 at 03:56 PM
1 Unit Available
French Quarter
1000 Royal Street - 3
1000 Royal Street, New Orleans, LA
2 Bedrooms
$1,950
1000 sqft
Lower residential French Quarter - Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1 bath corner apartment with a huge wrap-around private balcony overlooking Royal St. and St. Philip! High ceilings, wooden floors, beautiful chandeliers, laundry available inside building.
Last updated September 17 at 03:56 PM
1 Unit Available
Tulane - Gravier
2514 Conti Street
2514 Conti Street, New Orleans, LA
Studio
$700
200 sqft
This is Private Room with a Shared Common Area and Bath This newly renovated Mid-City Property will be great for you. You will love my place because of the coziness, the location, and the high ceilings.
Last updated September 17 at 03:56 PM
1 Unit Available
French Quarter
517 Dumaine Street - 4PH
517 Dumaine Street, New Orleans, LA
2 Bedrooms
$2,300
1114 sqft
Luxurious, furnished penthouse with a private balcony, beautiful hardwood floors, and a gorgeous view of the river! Located in the desirable lower residential French Quarter, just steps from the Mississippi River, Jackson Square, and so much more!
Last updated September 17 at 03:56 PM
1 Unit Available
Milan
3321 Baronne Street
3321 Baronne Street, New Orleans, LA
2 Bedrooms
$1,500
960 sqft
Find studio, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments for rent at 3321 Baronne Street in New Orleans. View photos, descriptions and more!
Last updated September 17 at 03:56 PM
1 Unit Available
French Quarter
922 St. Louis Street-1
922 Saint Louis Street, New Orleans, LA
2 Bedrooms
$2,000
900 sqft
Beautiful 2bdrm/2bath F.Q. apartment on the residential side of the Quarter. GATED OFF-STREET PARKING for one vehicle. Recently updated with new hardwood floors, and freshly painted throughout. This lovely apartment could be yours!
Last updated September 17 at 03:56 PM
1 Unit Available
Central City
1228 Carondelet Street-Upper
1228 Carondelet Street, New Orleans, LA
2 Bedrooms
$800
650 sqft
Find studio, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments for rent at 1228 Carondelet Street-Upper in New Orleans. View photos, descriptions and more!
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Find an apartment for rent in New Orleans, LA

Searching for an apartment for rent in New Orleans, LA? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 385 available rental units listed on Apartment List in New Orleans. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in New Orleans is $687 for a studio, $801 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $971 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of New Orleans apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next New Orleans, LA apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in New Orleans?
In New Orleans, the median rent is $687 for a studio, $801 for a 1-bedroom, $971 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,244 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in New Orleans, check out our monthly New Orleans Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in New Orleans?
You can filter cheap apartments in New Orleans by price: under $700, under $800.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in New Orleans?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find New Orleans apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some New Orleans properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in New Orleans?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in New Orleans.
How can I find off-campus housing in New Orleans?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around New Orleans. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Delgado Community College, Dillard University, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans, Loyola University New Orleans, and University of Holy Cross.

Median Rent in New Orleans

Last updated Aug. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in New Orleans is $801, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $971.
Studio
$687
1 Bed
$801
2 Beds
$971
3+ Beds
$1,244
City GuideNew Orleans
If ever a city rose from its ashes, that city is New Orleans. Chances are you’re proud to live in NOLA. This guide aims to help extend your pride to how you live in NOLA. Are you a gracious, Southern hostess, throwing large dinner parties in your plantation-era home? Or are you a low-impact sustainability guru, living simply out of your quaint shotgun? Perhaps you don’t know who you are—or, should I say, who you’d like to be. That’s why apartment hunting is thrilling: the possibilities, my de...
If ever a city rose from its ashes, that city is New Orleans. Chances are you’re proud to live in NOLA. This guide aims to help extend your pride to how you live in NOLA. Are you a gracious, Southern hostess, throwing large dinner parties in your plantation-era home? Or are you a low-impact sustainability guru, living simply out of your quaint shotgun? Perhaps you don’t know who you are—or, should I say, who you’d like to be. That’s why apartment hunting is thrilling: the possibilities, my de...
Living in NOLA, Post-Katrina

OK, the hurricane didn’t change everything, but it did lend a few challenges to the housing market in the years following 2005. Use the NOLA Times-Picayune and the alternative weekly The Gambit to brush up on local trends and employment opportunities in various districts. Expect most units to require at least 6-8 months on a lease and a deposit to match the first month’s rent. In addition to these normal stipulations, be informed about the following:

  1. Flooded Areas. Rent is lower in areas where flooding was extensive. But beware the condition of these units. Make extensive visual and verbal inquiry into the damage done and renovations performed since. Generally, areas that experienced the most flooding are located east of City Park and the CBD.

  2. Transportation. The European feel of NOLA isn’t just in the food and architecture. This city is ranked 6th in the U.S. for most bicycle commuters, and the historic streetcar system was fully restored to working order in 2008. Maybe it’s one of those chicken-and-egg things, but there’s also not much parking in and around the CBD. Car insurance is also higher here. Might make sense to join everyone and grab a bike or rely on public transportation. We’d advise taking a look at the Regional Transit Authority’s website (http://www.norta.com) to view streetcar and bus line maps in order to determine which area of town you’d like to be in and what your transit options are.

  3. Air Conditioning. There’s an eternal debate raging in NOLA whether the heat or the mosquitoes are worse. Whoever wins, there are a couple of tips you can follow to ensure you don’t get the short end of the stick. First, ask your potential landlord if the A/C is operated centrally or if you have climate control of your personal space. If utilities are not included, expect to chunk about $150/month in Entergy’s direction during the hottest summer months. Second, ask your landlord to put screens on the windows you aim to leave open for circulation. (For some reason, this little perk is not par for the course in NOLA…)

Eating Your Way Through NOLA

New York may have bagels and lox and Minneapolis may have lefse (what—you’re not Swedish?), but NOLA has…well, a lot! Check out these Cajun dishes and the neighborhood/apartment options they correspond to before sitting down to dinner in your new home.

King Cake—$25: The French Quarter. This rich and royal bread is consumed by most only once a year—between January 6th and Mardi Gras—but perhaps you’re the type that requires others to address you as “Your Highness” in daily communication. Fully furnished courtyard studios run $1500-$1850/month, courtyard suites max out at $2500/month (all utilities included). Another mint julep, Mr. Percy?? Hmm, yes!

Gumbo—$12: Calling all seafood-loving hipsters! Marigny is adjacent to the French Quarter and boasts heaps of coffeehouses and bars (Mimi’s, anyone?). Bywater, just east of Marigny, gets less expensive but retains most the excitement. East and north of Bywater, however, gets ugly… Half double apartments (these have four rooms, any of which can be a bedroom) in Marigny begin at $850/month. Expect higher for studio units and lower for the same in Bywater.

Po-Boys—$8: The bread-and-butter of NOLA neighborhoods, Uptown is a diverse and all-American district perfect for anyone with ties to Xavier University or needing to get to the airport quickly. A solid, but often mundane, daily diet for those practical-minded hunters. Primarily residential, Broadmoor was the only neighborhood hit hard by Katrina in Uptown. Two-bedroom shotguns in Broadmoor start at $900/month. Nicer units usually run $500-$600/month per room.

Jumbalaya—$11: Mid-City is a coveted hodge-podge of classic NOLA. Essential for the streetcar commuter or frequent City Park runner, Mid-City is residential without losing that special urban and commercial hype. Luxury one-bedrooms on Tulane Ave. average $900/month (add $250/month for a balcony). Humbler one-bedroom units on South Carrolton rarely exceed $700/month.

Beignets—$15: If you loved Gone With the Wind and Miller’s Crossing, typically lounge around the veranda on Sunday afternoons sipping coffee, and prefer to drive at least twenty blocks to see some commercial action, you’ll savor being a Garden District resident. Rent is a wee higher in this leisurely neighborhood, around the Lower Garden District (Upper GD = more houses and less apartments) and Tulane a one-bedroom should cost around $700-$800/month. Apparently, Garden District apartment managers despise cats; so prepare to shell out an extra $250 flat fee to keep Fluffy in Southern comfort.

“Sir? Ma’am? Did you get a chance to look over our menu?” Oodles of landlords and apartment managers stand ready to take your order in this city of plenty. What are you waiting for? Go ahead—dig in!

Read More
City GuideNew Orleans
If ever a city rose from its ashes, that city is New Orleans. Chances are you’re proud to live in NOLA. This guide aims to help extend your pride to how you live in NOLA. Are you a gracious, Southern hostess, throwing large dinner parties in your plantation-era home? Or are you a low-impact sustainability guru, living simply out of your quaint shotgun? Perhaps you don’t know who you are—or, should I say, who you’d like to be. That’s why apartment hunting is thrilling: the possibilities, my de...
If ever a city rose from its ashes, that city is New Orleans. Chances are you’re proud to live in NOLA. This guide aims to help extend your pride to how you live in NOLA. Are you a gracious, Southern hostess, throwing large dinner parties in your plantation-era home? Or are you a low-impact sustainability guru, living simply out of your quaint shotgun? Perhaps you don’t know who you are—or, should I say, who you’d like to be. That’s why apartment hunting is thrilling: the possibilities, my de...
Living in NOLA, Post-Katrina

OK, the hurricane didn’t change everything, but it did lend a few challenges to the housing market in the years following 2005. Use the NOLA Times-Picayune and the alternative weekly The Gambit to brush up on local trends and employment opportunities in various districts. Expect most units to require at least 6-8 months on a lease and a deposit to match the first month’s rent. In addition to these normal stipulations, be informed about the following:

  1. Flooded Areas. Rent is lower in areas where flooding was extensive. But beware the condition of these units. Make extensive visual and verbal inquiry into the damage done and renovations performed since. Generally, areas that experienced the most flooding are located east of City Park and the CBD.

  2. Transportation. The European feel of NOLA isn’t just in the food and architecture. This city is ranked 6th in the U.S. for most bicycle commuters, and the historic streetcar system was fully restored to working order in 2008. Maybe it’s one of those chicken-and-egg things, but there’s also not much parking in and around the CBD. Car insurance is also higher here. Might make sense to join everyone and grab a bike or rely on public transportation. We’d advise taking a look at the Regional Transit Authority’s website (http://www.norta.com) to view streetcar and bus line maps in order to determine which area of town you’d like to be in and what your transit options are.

  3. Air Conditioning. There’s an eternal debate raging in NOLA whether the heat or the mosquitoes are worse. Whoever wins, there are a couple of tips you can follow to ensure you don’t get the short end of the stick. First, ask your potential landlord if the A/C is operated centrally or if you have climate control of your personal space. If utilities are not included, expect to chunk about $150/month in Entergy’s direction during the hottest summer months. Second, ask your landlord to put screens on the windows you aim to leave open for circulation. (For some reason, this little perk is not par for the course in NOLA…)

Eating Your Way Through NOLA

New York may have bagels and lox and Minneapolis may have lefse (what—you’re not Swedish?), but NOLA has…well, a lot! Check out these Cajun dishes and the neighborhood/apartment options they correspond to before sitting down to dinner in your new home.

King Cake—$25: The French Quarter. This rich and royal bread is consumed by most only once a year—between January 6th and Mardi Gras—but perhaps you’re the type that requires others to address you as “Your Highness” in daily communication. Fully furnished courtyard studios run $1500-$1850/month, courtyard suites max out at $2500/month (all utilities included). Another mint julep, Mr. Percy?? Hmm, yes!

Gumbo—$12: Calling all seafood-loving hipsters! Marigny is adjacent to the French Quarter and boasts heaps of coffeehouses and bars (Mimi’s, anyone?). Bywater, just east of Marigny, gets less expensive but retains most the excitement. East and north of Bywater, however, gets ugly… Half double apartments (these have four rooms, any of which can be a bedroom) in Marigny begin at $850/month. Expect higher for studio units and lower for the same in Bywater.

Po-Boys—$8: The bread-and-butter of NOLA neighborhoods, Uptown is a diverse and all-American district perfect for anyone with ties to Xavier University or needing to get to the airport quickly. A solid, but often mundane, daily diet for those practical-minded hunters. Primarily residential, Broadmoor was the only neighborhood hit hard by Katrina in Uptown. Two-bedroom shotguns in Broadmoor start at $900/month. Nicer units usually run $500-$600/month per room.

Jumbalaya—$11: Mid-City is a coveted hodge-podge of classic NOLA. Essential for the streetcar commuter or frequent City Park runner, Mid-City is residential without losing that special urban and commercial hype. Luxury one-bedrooms on Tulane Ave. average $900/month (add $250/month for a balcony). Humbler one-bedroom units on South Carrolton rarely exceed $700/month.

Beignets—$15: If you loved Gone With the Wind and Miller’s Crossing, typically lounge around the veranda on Sunday afternoons sipping coffee, and prefer to drive at least twenty blocks to see some commercial action, you’ll savor being a Garden District resident. Rent is a wee higher in this leisurely neighborhood, around the Lower Garden District (Upper GD = more houses and less apartments) and Tulane a one-bedroom should cost around $700-$800/month. Apparently, Garden District apartment managers despise cats; so prepare to shell out an extra $250 flat fee to keep Fluffy in Southern comfort.

“Sir? Ma’am? Did you get a chance to look over our menu?” Oodles of landlords and apartment managers stand ready to take your order in this city of plenty. What are you waiting for? Go ahead—dig in!

Rent Report
New Orleans

September 2020 New Orleans Rent Report

Welcome to the September 2020 New Orleans Rent Report. New Orleans rents remained steady over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the New Orleans rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

New Orleans rent trends were flat over the past month

New Orleans rents have declined 0.1% over the past month, but have remained steady at 0.3% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in New Orleans stand at $802 for a one-bedroom apartment and $971 for a two-bedroom. New Orleans' year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of -0.4%, but is in line with the national average of 0.3%.

    New Orleans rents more affordable than many large cities nationwide

    Rent growth in New Orleans has been relatively stable over the past year - some other large cities have seen more substantial increases; in contrast, rents in a few cities have actually declined. New Orleans is still more affordable than most large cities across the country.

    • New Orleans' median two-bedroom rent of $971 is below the national average of $1,195. Nationwide, rents have held steady over the past year.
    • While rents in New Orleans remained moderately stable this year, similar cities saw increases, including Phoenix (+1.7%), Detroit (+0.8%), Dallas (+-0.4%); note that median 2BR rents in these cities go for $1,107, $902, and $1,130 respectively.
    • Renters will find more reasonable prices in New Orleans than most large cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,956, which is more than three times the price in New Orleans.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology here.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    September 2020 New Orleans Rent Report

    Welcome to the September 2020 New Orleans Rent Report. New Orleans rents remained steady over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the New Orleans rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    View full Rent Report

    September 2020 New Orleans Rent Report

    Welcome to the September 2020 New Orleans Rent Report. New Orleans rents remained steady over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the New Orleans rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    New Orleans rent trends were flat over the past month

    New Orleans rents have declined 0.1% over the past month, but have remained steady at 0.3% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in New Orleans stand at $802 for a one-bedroom apartment and $971 for a two-bedroom. New Orleans' year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of -0.4%, but is in line with the national average of 0.3%.

      New Orleans rents more affordable than many large cities nationwide

      Rent growth in New Orleans has been relatively stable over the past year - some other large cities have seen more substantial increases; in contrast, rents in a few cities have actually declined. New Orleans is still more affordable than most large cities across the country.

      • New Orleans' median two-bedroom rent of $971 is below the national average of $1,195. Nationwide, rents have held steady over the past year.
      • While rents in New Orleans remained moderately stable this year, similar cities saw increases, including Phoenix (+1.7%), Detroit (+0.8%), Dallas (+-0.4%); note that median 2BR rents in these cities go for $1,107, $902, and $1,130 respectively.
      • Renters will find more reasonable prices in New Orleans than most large cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,956, which is more than three times the price in New Orleans.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology here.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

      New Orleans Renter Confidence Survey
      National study of renter’s satisfaction with their cities and states

      Here’s how New Orleans ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      D
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A
      Recreational activities
      C+
      Affordability
      B+
      Social Life
      C
      Weather
      B
      Commute time
      C+
      State and local taxes
      D
      Public transit
      A-
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released New Orleans’ results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "New Orleans renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love New Orleans, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in New Orleans include the following:

      • New Orleans renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for New Orleans were recreational activities and pet-friendliness, which received A and A- grades, respectively.
      • The areas of concern to New Orleans renters are safety and low crime and the quality of local schools, which both received scores of F.
        • New Orleans did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Saint Louis (C+), Miami (C+) and Sacramento (C).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "The city is great for community, nightlife, festivals and fun. However, the professional opportunities don’t measure up." -Tracy J.
      • "New Orleans is full of incredible, friendly people and the soul of this town is unique beyond words." -Zoleka D.
      • "I love the culture, but wish there was more safe, affordable housing." -Toni O.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.
      Read More

      Renter Confidence Survey

      Apartment List has released New Orleans’ results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "New Orleans renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartme...

      View full New Orleans Renter Survey

      Here’s how New Orleans ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      D
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A
      Recreational activities
      C+
      Affordability
      B+
      Social Life
      C
      Weather
      B
      Commute time
      C+
      State and local taxes
      D
      Public transit
      A-
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released New Orleans’ results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "New Orleans renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love New Orleans, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in New Orleans include the following:

      • New Orleans renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for New Orleans were recreational activities and pet-friendliness, which received A and A- grades, respectively.
      • The areas of concern to New Orleans renters are safety and low crime and the quality of local schools, which both received scores of F.
        • New Orleans did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Saint Louis (C+), Miami (C+) and Sacramento (C).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "The city is great for community, nightlife, festivals and fun. However, the professional opportunities don’t measure up." -Tracy J.
      • "New Orleans is full of incredible, friendly people and the soul of this town is unique beyond words." -Zoleka D.
      • "I love the culture, but wish there was more safe, affordable housing." -Toni O.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.