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honolulu
Last updated November 24 2020 at 7:50 PM

300 Apartments for rent in Honolulu, HI

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Makiki Lower Punchbowl Tantalu
Waikiki
Mccully Moiliili
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Check out 300 verified apartments for rent in Honolulu, HI with rents starting as low as $700. Some apartments for rent in Honolulu might offer rent specials. Look out for the
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rent special icon!
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Verified
4 Units Available
Kanekapolei Collection
429 Kanekapolei Street
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
1 Bedroom
$1,483
429 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:38 PM
Coming August/September 2020, Kanekapolei Collection will offer 53 fully renovated, affordable one and two bedroom rentals in four existing low-rise buildings on Kanekapolei Street, located across from the planned Lilia Waikikis high-rise
$
Verified
3 Units Available
Kapiolani Village
2647 Kapiolani Blvd #3
Honolulu, HI | Mccully - Moiliili
1 Bedroom
$1,271
480 sqft
2 Bedrooms
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3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:37 PM
Experience your new home at Kapiolani Village Apartments. Located in Honolulu's 96826 area, living at this community gives you a variety of nearby highlights.
Verified
2 Units Available
Punahou Heights
1552 Young Street
Honolulu, HI | Mccully - Moiliili
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$2,495
730 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:37 PM
Welcome home to beautiful Punahou Heights Apartment Homes. You can't beat the location on the corner of Young and Punahou. Spacious floor plans offer large open floor plans with wood like flooring, great kitchens.
$
Verified
1 Unit Available
Kewalo Apartments
1442 Kewalo Street
Honolulu, HI | Makiki - Lower Punchbowl - Tantalu
Studio
$1,395
320 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:37 PM
Welcome home to Kewalo Apartments. Your future community offers Studio apartment homes. Kewalo Apartments is conveniently located at 1442 Kewalo Street in lovely Makiki.
$
Verified
2 Units Available
Moana Vista Apartments
1720 Ala Moana Boulevard
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,450
460 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:37 PM
Conveniently located at the edge of Waikiki! Our apartment homes are located between Ala Moana and Waikiki. Our neighborhood puts you close to all life's needs. Enjoy the exciting Waikiki night life or relax at beautiful Ala Moana Beach Park.
Verified
4 Units Available
Waikiki Walina Apartment Homes
441 Walina St
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
Studio
$1,595
561 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:37 PM
Make your new home at Waikiki Walina Apartments, located in the heart of Waikiki with its spectacular beaches, world-class shopping and a wide variety of dining choices.
Verified
1 Unit Available
Napili Towers
451 Nahua Street
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
1 Bedroom
$1,850
507 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 18 at 01:40 AM
Our RENOVATED, trendy apartment homes feature modern interiors in a prime Waikiki location. Overlooking the Ala Wai Canal, we offer you affordable luxury. Our property is about two short blocks to the newly built International Market Place.
1 Unit Available
3082 Kahewai Place
3082 Kahewai Place
Honolulu, HI | Manoa
2 Bedrooms
$2,200
728 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 08:09 PM
Newly remodeled 2 bedroom 1 bath single family home on a quiet street off East Manoa Road. This charming Manoa home is perfectly situated with views of Manoa park directly behind you.
1 Unit Available
2622 B Waolani Ave
2622 Waolani Ave
Honolulu, HI | Liliha - Kapalama
Studio
$1,495
350 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 08:09 PM
Come see this large studio townhouse with 1 parking stall. Located in town with a short drive to the Pali and H1 freeway, as well as a short drive to shopping centers, restaurants, downtown, and more! Recently remodeled (April 2016).
1 Unit Available
736 Hawaii St
736 Hawaii Street
Honolulu, HI | Liliha - Kapalama
3 Bedrooms
$4,000
2200 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 08:09 PM
ARCHITECT-DESIGNED 3 bed, 3 bath executive home located in Nuuanu/Puunui! This CUSTOM executive residence is perched on the top of Nuuanu, in a tranquil setting yet minutes from town.
1 Unit Available
901 Prospect Street
901 Prospect Street
Honolulu, HI | Makiki - Lower Punchbowl - Tantalu
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,395
428 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 08:09 PM
Located at the top floor, move right in to this 1 bed, 1 bath, w/ 1 COVERED parking stall located at the top of Ward Ave and Prospect St! Tastefully renovated with updated flooring and bathroom.
1 Unit Available
1586 Nobrega St
1586 Nobrega Street
Honolulu, HI | Kalihi Valley
3 Bedrooms
$2,195
1200 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 08:09 PM
Must see 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom pet friendly single story home.
1 Unit Available
908 University Avenue
908 University Avenue
Honolulu, HI | Mccully - Moiliili
2 Bedrooms
$1,595
575 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 08:09 PM
Come see this newly renovated 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom condo located in Moiliili. Located on the 3rd floor of a 3-story walkup. Features 1 assigned parking stall, window AC, coin-operated community laundry.
1 Unit Available
1631 Kapiolani Boulevard
1631 Kapiolani Boulevard
Honolulu, HI | Ala Moana - Kakaako
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$3,000
892 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Available December 1st, 895 sq ft, 2 bedroom condo, 2 full bathrooms, 1 parking unit at the recently (2019) built Kapiolani Residence.
1 Unit Available
3030 Pualei Circle
3030 Pualei Circle
Honolulu, HI | Diamond Head - Kapahulu - St. Louis
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$3,000
1038 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Stylish Unit in Prime Location. Tree-top living in the most desirable building in Pualei Circle, available January 15th.
1 Unit Available
425 South Street
425 South Street
Honolulu, HI | Ala Moana - Kakaako
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$3,500
1569 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
1625s.f including Lanai! Rarely available '01' unit in Makua tower. Beautiful corner unit, enjoy gorgeous sweeping Ocean, Diamond Head, Coast line, Downtown and harbor view from lanai, LARGE living room and each bedroom.
1 Unit Available
3310 Brokaw Street
3310 Brokaw Street
Honolulu, HI | Diamond Head - Kapahulu - St. Louis
2 Bedrooms
$2,200
800 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Beautiful two bedroom, one bath rental in Diamondhead area. Remodeled kitchen with new cabinetry and counters. Laminate floors throughout. Window air conditioning in both bedrooms. Great views from the living room, kitchen and dining area.
1 Unit Available
1212 Nuuanu Avenue
1212 Nuuanu Avenue
Honolulu, HI | Downtown Honolulu
1 Bedroom
$2,200
644 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Large fully furnished 1 bdrm/1 bath end unit, with approx. 774 sf of living area + 2 lanais approx. 264 sf with city and mountain views. Central A/C unit.
1 Unit Available
2345 Ala Wai Boulevard
2345 Ala Wai Boulevard
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
Studio
$1,475
382 sqft
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Nice and clean fully furnished studio unit comes with one assigned covered parking. Washer & Dryer in the unit, window AC. Rent, $1,475.00/month includes tax and basic TV service. Minimum 6 months lease required.
1 Unit Available
225 Liliuokalani Avenue
225 Liliʻuokalani Avenue
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
1 Bedroom
$1,600
516 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Available Now! 680 sqft 1 bed, 1 bath, NO parking unit at Waikiki Imperial Apartments. This SPACIOUS, furnished unit offers a functional layout, window AC, ample closet space and bonus enclosed lanai space.
1 Unit Available
343 Hobron Lane
343 Hobron Lane
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$2,600
915 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Newer building in Waikiki, The Windsor has the amenities and feel of a hotel in a convenient location on the Ewa side of Waikiki. Upgraded laminate wood floors in the living area and move in ready.
1 Unit Available
2024 Lime Street
2024 Lime Street
Honolulu, HI | Mccully - Moiliili
1 Bedroom
$1,400
550 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Available now, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, 550 sq ft unit on Lime St. The unit offers 1 parking stall, complete renovations, open kitchen, lots of closet space, freshly painted walls, private W/D and functional layout.
1 Unit Available
1920 ala moana Boulevard
1920 Ala Moana Boulevard
Honolulu, HI | Waikiki
Studio
$1,500
244 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Spectacular views of Waikiki Beach & Diamond Head from this charming studio at Inn on the Park on the 20th flr. Laminate floor, bright unit with new kitchenette counters & tastefully decorated.
1 Unit Available
1566 Kewalo Street
1566 Kewalo Street
Honolulu, HI | Makiki - Lower Punchbowl - Tantalu
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$1,100
400 sqft
Last updated November 24 at 07:06 PM
Ground floor 1 bdrm/1 bath unit w/ approx. 400 sf of living area. Upgraded with laminate flooring and kitchen counter top. Community laundry on site.

Median Rent in Honolulu

Last updated Nov. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Honolulu is $1,478, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,964.
Studio
$1,337
1 Bed
$1,478
2 Beds
$1,964
3+ Beds
$2,796
Find More Rentals By

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Honolulu 1 Bedroom Apartments

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Find an apartment for rent in Honolulu, HI


Searching for an apartment for rent in Honolulu, HI? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 300 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Honolulu. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in Honolulu is $1,337 for a studio, $1,478 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $1,964 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Honolulu apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Honolulu, HI apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Honolulu?
In Honolulu, the median rent is $1,337 for a studio, $1,478 for a 1-bedroom, $1,964 for a 2-bedroom, and $2,796 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Honolulu, check out our monthly Honolulu Rent Report.
How much is rent in Honolulu?
In Honolulu, the median rent is $1,337 for a studio, $1,478 for a 1-bedroom, $1,964 for a 2-bedroom, and $2,796 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Honolulu, check out our monthly Honolulu Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Honolulu?
You can find the lowest-priced apartments in Honolulu by using the cheap apartments filter.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Honolulu?
You can find the lowest-priced apartments in Honolulu by using the cheap apartments filter.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Honolulu?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Honolulu apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Honolulu?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Honolulu apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Honolulu properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Honolulu properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Honolulu?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Honolulu.
How much should I pay for rent in Honolulu?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Honolulu.
How can I find off-campus housing in Honolulu?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Honolulu. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Pacific University, Kapiolani Community College, and Honolulu Community College.
How can I find off-campus housing in Honolulu?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Honolulu. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Pacific University, Kapiolani Community College, and Honolulu Community College.

Median Rent in Honolulu

Last updated Nov. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Honolulu is $1,478, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,964.
Studio
$1,337
1 Bed
$1,478
2 Beds
$1,964
3+ Beds
$2,796

City Guide

Honolulu
“Together they would travel on a boat with billowed sail / Jackie kept a lookout perched on Puff's gigantic tail / Noble kings and princes would bow whenever they came / Pirate ships would lower their flag when Puff roared out his name, oh! / Puff the magic dragon lived by the sea / And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honah Lee” (Peter, Paul and Mary, "Puff the Magic Dragon")
“Together they would travel on a boat with billowed sail / Jackie kept a lookout perched on Puff's gigantic tail / Noble kings and princes would bow whenever they came / Pirate ships would lower their flag when Puff roared out his name, oh! / Puff the magic dragon lived by the sea / And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honah Lee” (Peter, Paul and Mary, "Puff the Magic Dragon")

The name conjures images of palm fronds swaying in the breeze, soft, white sand beaches, and drinks with tiny, colorful umbrellas perched atop unnaturally blue liquids. Honolulu, Hawaii is, in a word, paradise. It’s the highly sought after, often only dreamed of location for epic vacations and destination weddings. But this beautiful pearl of the Pacific isn’t just an escape; for many, it’s home. Grab a ukulele, some ahi poke, and a blank check, because it’s time to hula into Hawaii’s rental market.

Not Your Average Paradise

The city of Honolulu holds the award for most populous in all the Hawaiian Islands, with over 390,000 folks. Honolulu is a major business hub, with a downtown area that boasts skyscrapers Los Angeles would be jealous of, and an active military base.

That doesn’t mean everyone is high-tailing it to the financial sector with a briefcase in one hand and coffee cup in the other. Count on seeing designer suits stained with shave ice syrup and more than a reasonable amount of Aloha shirts, regardless of the day of the week.

Not Your Average Paradise
+

The city of Honolulu holds the award for most populous in all the Hawaiian Islands, with over 390,000 folks. Honolulu is a major business hub, with a downtown area that boasts skyscrapers Los Angeles would be jealous of, and an active military base.

That doesn’t mean everyone is high-tailing it to the financial sector with a briefcase in one hand and coffee cup in the other. Count on seeing designer suits stained with shave ice syrup and more than a reasonable amount of Aloha shirts, regardless of the day of the week.

About Those Prices

What is Shangri-La for your spirit may be Hades for your bank account. Hawaii as a whole is far more expensive than the mainland, but Honolulu especially so. Compared with Denver, Colo., for instance, housing is 123%, groceries 52%, utilities 80%, and transportation 13% more expensive. Still, stress is rare when surrounded by a perfect seascape and endless summer weather. Just make sure whatever job you’re moving to can make those new expenses feasible.

About Those Prices
+

What is Shangri-La for your spirit may be Hades for your bank account. Hawaii as a whole is far more expensive than the mainland, but Honolulu especially so. Compared with Denver, Colo., for instance, housing is 123%, groceries 52%, utilities 80%, and transportation 13% more expensive. Still, stress is rare when surrounded by a perfect seascape and endless summer weather. Just make sure whatever job you’re moving to can make those new expenses feasible.

A Few Tips Before the Move

Living the dream is exciting, but the reality of moving to an island is incredibly complex. Do you have a pet? Get ready for 120 days of quarantine, and you’re footing the bill. Do you have a car? Shipping it is still less expensive than buying new, but that takes planning and a reputable company (and you know, time). There is TheBus, the local transportation (which is pretty great) but you’ll wish you had a car if you don’t. No national bank chain operates in Hawaii either, so get ready to switch accounts to a local option when you get here. Furniture, personal items and any other household goods that you plan on keeping long term should also be shipped. Start cruising container companies for deals now.

Speaking of now, it’s just not reasonable to think anything will get done quickly. Ideally, you’re two months ahead of moving with a solid job offer, an acquired residence, and ties to local communities. But, barring that miracle, finding places to live in Honolulu may be a multi-step process of arriving at a hotel, grabbing the first short-term lease that will have you, and then slowly seeking out truly appropriate accommodations from there. Things can be pretty loosey-goosey; it’s important to be flexible.

On the Plus Side Hawaiians are some of the warmest, most welcoming people on the planet. Get involved in community activities like sports, volunteer groups, or dance classes and become “ohana.” “Ohana” means family, and family means nobody gets left behind. Plus, “no shirt, no shoes” is totally primo.

A Few Tips Before the Move
+

Living the dream is exciting, but the reality of moving to an island is incredibly complex. Do you have a pet? Get ready for 120 days of quarantine, and you’re footing the bill. Do you have a car? Shipping it is still less expensive than buying new, but that takes planning and a reputable company (and you know, time). There is TheBus, the local transportation (which is pretty great) but you’ll wish you had a car if you don’t. No national bank chain operates in Hawaii either, so get ready to switch accounts to a local option when you get here. Furniture, personal items and any other household goods that you plan on keeping long term should also be shipped. Start cruising container companies for deals now.

Speaking of now, it’s just not reasonable to think anything will get done quickly. Ideally, you’re two months ahead of moving with a solid job offer, an acquired residence, and ties to local communities. But, barring that miracle, finding places to live in Honolulu may be a multi-step process of arriving at a hotel, grabbing the first short-term lease that will have you, and then slowly seeking out truly appropriate accommodations from there. Things can be pretty loosey-goosey; it’s important to be flexible.

On the Plus Side Hawaiians are some of the warmest, most welcoming people on the planet. Get involved in community activities like sports, volunteer groups, or dance classes and become “ohana.” “Ohana” means family, and family means nobody gets left behind. Plus, “no shirt, no shoes” is totally primo.

Finding the Right Neighborhood

Only a handful of districts in Honolulu offer more than a small village area and residential housing. If you’re dreaming of living within walking distance of cool shops and modern conveniences, your best bets are in Ala Moana and Waikiki, or probably back on the mainland. Locals aren’t big on boutique shopping, and they make due with weekly trips to the grocery store, which may be 20 minutes away by car. Still, there’s always the Internet if you have a desperate need for Forever 21’s disposable fashion.

Ala Moana: It’s all about high-rise apartment buildings and the biggest shopping center on the island. Ala Moana can almost pass as the real world, but it comes at a cost. It’s not quite as pricey as Waikiki, but you should still consider making friends and going bigger to save some cash.

Chinatown: No neighborhood varies as much in quality and price as Chinatown. You can find updated, modern, and open concepts and get gouged, or find others that are not nearly as nice. Or sometimes, you might discover problems as well as high prices. The point is, you can find a deal here if you hunt, plus it’s close to interesting sights.

Diamond Head: There are condos, single-family homes and apartments in Diamond Head, and each offers something different. But it ain’t inexpensive. It’s as expensive as Waikiki and further away from…everything. However, it’s a prettier location with fewer ambling tourists (but not much fewer).

Downtown: Parking is a big old mess here, and tickets pour out like pina coladas, so make sure you find a building that has reserved spots. Otherwise, Downtown is a great middle ground, as far as price and location, and it’s perfect for those who like walking to work. Pet friendly apartments are rare, though.

Makiki: If you don’t mind driving to the beach, grocery store, and restaurants, and you have detached-home dreams and overdraft realities, Makiki is the place to be. Purely residential, Makiki has a strong community feeling and a delightful inland separation from the hordes of tourists by the water.

Manoa: Another budget option, Manoa has property rentals with spacious lanais and comfortable if not recently updated amenities that should suit anyone with a hunger for true Hawaiian living, which is to say, quiet.

Waikiki: The brass ring of places to live in Honolulu, Waikiki Beach is full of active people from both nearby and around the globe. Clothing stores, chain restaurants, and luxury services pepper the streets lining the white sand beaches. So, yeah it’s hella expensive, dude. But through the nose is how you’ll pay if you want the best of everything.

Finding the Right Neighborhood
+

Only a handful of districts in Honolulu offer more than a small village area and residential housing. If you’re dreaming of living within walking distance of cool shops and modern conveniences, your best bets are in Ala Moana and Waikiki, or probably back on the mainland. Locals aren’t big on boutique shopping, and they make due with weekly trips to the grocery store, which may be 20 minutes away by car. Still, there’s always the Internet if you have a desperate need for Forever 21’s disposable fashion.

Ala Moana: It’s all about high-rise apartment buildings and the biggest shopping center on the island. Ala Moana can almost pass as the real world, but it comes at a cost. It’s not quite as pricey as Waikiki, but you should still consider making friends and going bigger to save some cash.

Chinatown: No neighborhood varies as much in quality and price as Chinatown. You can find updated, modern, and open concepts and get gouged, or find others that are not nearly as nice. Or sometimes, you might discover problems as well as high prices. The point is, you can find a deal here if you hunt, plus it’s close to interesting sights.

Diamond Head: There are condos, single-family homes and apartments in Diamond Head, and each offers something different. But it ain’t inexpensive. It’s as expensive as Waikiki and further away from…everything. However, it’s a prettier location with fewer ambling tourists (but not much fewer).

Downtown: Parking is a big old mess here, and tickets pour out like pina coladas, so make sure you find a building that has reserved spots. Otherwise, Downtown is a great middle ground, as far as price and location, and it’s perfect for those who like walking to work. Pet friendly apartments are rare, though.

Makiki: If you don’t mind driving to the beach, grocery store, and restaurants, and you have detached-home dreams and overdraft realities, Makiki is the place to be. Purely residential, Makiki has a strong community feeling and a delightful inland separation from the hordes of tourists by the water.

Manoa: Another budget option, Manoa has property rentals with spacious lanais and comfortable if not recently updated amenities that should suit anyone with a hunger for true Hawaiian living, which is to say, quiet.

Waikiki: The brass ring of places to live in Honolulu, Waikiki Beach is full of active people from both nearby and around the globe. Clothing stores, chain restaurants, and luxury services pepper the streets lining the white sand beaches. So, yeah it’s hella expensive, dude. But through the nose is how you’ll pay if you want the best of everything.

Living La Vida Local

Hawaii is serene, slow-paced, and sociable; everyone is welcoming and they want you to join in on their activities. The lifestyle is very laid back, but outdoor living is a requirement. Lanais, which are outdoor covered patios or balconies, are an essential element of the home, and the place most house dwellers spend the majority of their time when not actually outside in the water, hiking the mountains, biking the trails, in the water, meeting up with friends, eating at shrimp trucks, or swimming.

Honolulu is absolutely a paradise on Earth, and it’s just this side of plausible that anyone can pick up and move there on a whim and make it. If you’re planning on whimming it to Waikiki, just remember Heaven has high tariffs, but the ocean, sun, and sand really do offer all you need.

Living La Vida Local
+

Hawaii is serene, slow-paced, and sociable; everyone is welcoming and they want you to join in on their activities. The lifestyle is very laid back, but outdoor living is a requirement. Lanais, which are outdoor covered patios or balconies, are an essential element of the home, and the place most house dwellers spend the majority of their time when not actually outside in the water, hiking the mountains, biking the trails, in the water, meeting up with friends, eating at shrimp trucks, or swimming.

Honolulu is absolutely a paradise on Earth, and it’s just this side of plausible that anyone can pick up and move there on a whim and make it. If you’re planning on whimming it to Waikiki, just remember Heaven has high tariffs, but the ocean, sun, and sand really do offer all you need.

Read More

City Guide

Honolulu
“Together they would travel on a boat with billowed sail / Jackie kept a lookout perched on Puff's gigantic tail / Noble kings and princes would bow whenever they came / Pirate ships would lower their flag when Puff roared out his name, oh! / Puff the magic dragon lived by the sea / And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honah Lee” (Peter, Paul and Mary, "Puff the Magic Dragon")
“Together they would travel on a boat with billowed sail / Jackie kept a lookout perched on Puff's gigantic tail / Noble kings and princes would bow whenever they came / Pirate ships would lower their flag when Puff roared out his name, oh! / Puff the magic dragon lived by the sea / And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honah Lee” (Peter, Paul and Mary, "Puff the Magic Dragon")

The name conjures images of palm fronds swaying in the breeze, soft, white sand beaches, and drinks with tiny, colorful umbrellas perched atop unnaturally blue liquids. Honolulu, Hawaii is, in a word, paradise. It’s the highly sought after, often only dreamed of location for epic vacations and destination weddings. But this beautiful pearl of the Pacific isn’t just an escape; for many, it’s home. Grab a ukulele, some ahi poke, and a blank check, because it’s time to hula into Hawaii’s rental market.

Not Your Average Paradise

The city of Honolulu holds the award for most populous in all the Hawaiian Islands, with over 390,000 folks. Honolulu is a major business hub, with a downtown area that boasts skyscrapers Los Angeles would be jealous of, and an active military base.

That doesn’t mean everyone is high-tailing it to the financial sector with a briefcase in one hand and coffee cup in the other. Count on seeing designer suits stained with shave ice syrup and more than a reasonable amount of Aloha shirts, regardless of the day of the week.

Not Your Average Paradise
+

The city of Honolulu holds the award for most populous in all the Hawaiian Islands, with over 390,000 folks. Honolulu is a major business hub, with a downtown area that boasts skyscrapers Los Angeles would be jealous of, and an active military base.

That doesn’t mean everyone is high-tailing it to the financial sector with a briefcase in one hand and coffee cup in the other. Count on seeing designer suits stained with shave ice syrup and more than a reasonable amount of Aloha shirts, regardless of the day of the week.

About Those Prices

What is Shangri-La for your spirit may be Hades for your bank account. Hawaii as a whole is far more expensive than the mainland, but Honolulu especially so. Compared with Denver, Colo., for instance, housing is 123%, groceries 52%, utilities 80%, and transportation 13% more expensive. Still, stress is rare when surrounded by a perfect seascape and endless summer weather. Just make sure whatever job you’re moving to can make those new expenses feasible.

About Those Prices
+

What is Shangri-La for your spirit may be Hades for your bank account. Hawaii as a whole is far more expensive than the mainland, but Honolulu especially so. Compared with Denver, Colo., for instance, housing is 123%, groceries 52%, utilities 80%, and transportation 13% more expensive. Still, stress is rare when surrounded by a perfect seascape and endless summer weather. Just make sure whatever job you’re moving to can make those new expenses feasible.

A Few Tips Before the Move

Living the dream is exciting, but the reality of moving to an island is incredibly complex. Do you have a pet? Get ready for 120 days of quarantine, and you’re footing the bill. Do you have a car? Shipping it is still less expensive than buying new, but that takes planning and a reputable company (and you know, time). There is TheBus, the local transportation (which is pretty great) but you’ll wish you had a car if you don’t. No national bank chain operates in Hawaii either, so get ready to switch accounts to a local option when you get here. Furniture, personal items and any other household goods that you plan on keeping long term should also be shipped. Start cruising container companies for deals now.

Speaking of now, it’s just not reasonable to think anything will get done quickly. Ideally, you’re two months ahead of moving with a solid job offer, an acquired residence, and ties to local communities. But, barring that miracle, finding places to live in Honolulu may be a multi-step process of arriving at a hotel, grabbing the first short-term lease that will have you, and then slowly seeking out truly appropriate accommodations from there. Things can be pretty loosey-goosey; it’s important to be flexible.

On the Plus Side Hawaiians are some of the warmest, most welcoming people on the planet. Get involved in community activities like sports, volunteer groups, or dance classes and become “ohana.” “Ohana” means family, and family means nobody gets left behind. Plus, “no shirt, no shoes” is totally primo.

A Few Tips Before the Move
+

Living the dream is exciting, but the reality of moving to an island is incredibly complex. Do you have a pet? Get ready for 120 days of quarantine, and you’re footing the bill. Do you have a car? Shipping it is still less expensive than buying new, but that takes planning and a reputable company (and you know, time). There is TheBus, the local transportation (which is pretty great) but you’ll wish you had a car if you don’t. No national bank chain operates in Hawaii either, so get ready to switch accounts to a local option when you get here. Furniture, personal items and any other household goods that you plan on keeping long term should also be shipped. Start cruising container companies for deals now.

Speaking of now, it’s just not reasonable to think anything will get done quickly. Ideally, you’re two months ahead of moving with a solid job offer, an acquired residence, and ties to local communities. But, barring that miracle, finding places to live in Honolulu may be a multi-step process of arriving at a hotel, grabbing the first short-term lease that will have you, and then slowly seeking out truly appropriate accommodations from there. Things can be pretty loosey-goosey; it’s important to be flexible.

On the Plus Side Hawaiians are some of the warmest, most welcoming people on the planet. Get involved in community activities like sports, volunteer groups, or dance classes and become “ohana.” “Ohana” means family, and family means nobody gets left behind. Plus, “no shirt, no shoes” is totally primo.

Finding the Right Neighborhood

Only a handful of districts in Honolulu offer more than a small village area and residential housing. If you’re dreaming of living within walking distance of cool shops and modern conveniences, your best bets are in Ala Moana and Waikiki, or probably back on the mainland. Locals aren’t big on boutique shopping, and they make due with weekly trips to the grocery store, which may be 20 minutes away by car. Still, there’s always the Internet if you have a desperate need for Forever 21’s disposable fashion.

Ala Moana: It’s all about high-rise apartment buildings and the biggest shopping center on the island. Ala Moana can almost pass as the real world, but it comes at a cost. It’s not quite as pricey as Waikiki, but you should still consider making friends and going bigger to save some cash.

Chinatown: No neighborhood varies as much in quality and price as Chinatown. You can find updated, modern, and open concepts and get gouged, or find others that are not nearly as nice. Or sometimes, you might discover problems as well as high prices. The point is, you can find a deal here if you hunt, plus it’s close to interesting sights.

Diamond Head: There are condos, single-family homes and apartments in Diamond Head, and each offers something different. But it ain’t inexpensive. It’s as expensive as Waikiki and further away from…everything. However, it’s a prettier location with fewer ambling tourists (but not much fewer).

Downtown: Parking is a big old mess here, and tickets pour out like pina coladas, so make sure you find a building that has reserved spots. Otherwise, Downtown is a great middle ground, as far as price and location, and it’s perfect for those who like walking to work. Pet friendly apartments are rare, though.

Makiki: If you don’t mind driving to the beach, grocery store, and restaurants, and you have detached-home dreams and overdraft realities, Makiki is the place to be. Purely residential, Makiki has a strong community feeling and a delightful inland separation from the hordes of tourists by the water.

Manoa: Another budget option, Manoa has property rentals with spacious lanais and comfortable if not recently updated amenities that should suit anyone with a hunger for true Hawaiian living, which is to say, quiet.

Waikiki: The brass ring of places to live in Honolulu, Waikiki Beach is full of active people from both nearby and around the globe. Clothing stores, chain restaurants, and luxury services pepper the streets lining the white sand beaches. So, yeah it’s hella expensive, dude. But through the nose is how you’ll pay if you want the best of everything.

Finding the Right Neighborhood
+

Only a handful of districts in Honolulu offer more than a small village area and residential housing. If you’re dreaming of living within walking distance of cool shops and modern conveniences, your best bets are in Ala Moana and Waikiki, or probably back on the mainland. Locals aren’t big on boutique shopping, and they make due with weekly trips to the grocery store, which may be 20 minutes away by car. Still, there’s always the Internet if you have a desperate need for Forever 21’s disposable fashion.

Ala Moana: It’s all about high-rise apartment buildings and the biggest shopping center on the island. Ala Moana can almost pass as the real world, but it comes at a cost. It’s not quite as pricey as Waikiki, but you should still consider making friends and going bigger to save some cash.

Chinatown: No neighborhood varies as much in quality and price as Chinatown. You can find updated, modern, and open concepts and get gouged, or find others that are not nearly as nice. Or sometimes, you might discover problems as well as high prices. The point is, you can find a deal here if you hunt, plus it’s close to interesting sights.

Diamond Head: There are condos, single-family homes and apartments in Diamond Head, and each offers something different. But it ain’t inexpensive. It’s as expensive as Waikiki and further away from…everything. However, it’s a prettier location with fewer ambling tourists (but not much fewer).

Downtown: Parking is a big old mess here, and tickets pour out like pina coladas, so make sure you find a building that has reserved spots. Otherwise, Downtown is a great middle ground, as far as price and location, and it’s perfect for those who like walking to work. Pet friendly apartments are rare, though.

Makiki: If you don’t mind driving to the beach, grocery store, and restaurants, and you have detached-home dreams and overdraft realities, Makiki is the place to be. Purely residential, Makiki has a strong community feeling and a delightful inland separation from the hordes of tourists by the water.

Manoa: Another budget option, Manoa has property rentals with spacious lanais and comfortable if not recently updated amenities that should suit anyone with a hunger for true Hawaiian living, which is to say, quiet.

Waikiki: The brass ring of places to live in Honolulu, Waikiki Beach is full of active people from both nearby and around the globe. Clothing stores, chain restaurants, and luxury services pepper the streets lining the white sand beaches. So, yeah it’s hella expensive, dude. But through the nose is how you’ll pay if you want the best of everything.

Living La Vida Local

Hawaii is serene, slow-paced, and sociable; everyone is welcoming and they want you to join in on their activities. The lifestyle is very laid back, but outdoor living is a requirement. Lanais, which are outdoor covered patios or balconies, are an essential element of the home, and the place most house dwellers spend the majority of their time when not actually outside in the water, hiking the mountains, biking the trails, in the water, meeting up with friends, eating at shrimp trucks, or swimming.

Honolulu is absolutely a paradise on Earth, and it’s just this side of plausible that anyone can pick up and move there on a whim and make it. If you’re planning on whimming it to Waikiki, just remember Heaven has high tariffs, but the ocean, sun, and sand really do offer all you need.

Living La Vida Local
+

Hawaii is serene, slow-paced, and sociable; everyone is welcoming and they want you to join in on their activities. The lifestyle is very laid back, but outdoor living is a requirement. Lanais, which are outdoor covered patios or balconies, are an essential element of the home, and the place most house dwellers spend the majority of their time when not actually outside in the water, hiking the mountains, biking the trails, in the water, meeting up with friends, eating at shrimp trucks, or swimming.

Honolulu is absolutely a paradise on Earth, and it’s just this side of plausible that anyone can pick up and move there on a whim and make it. If you’re planning on whimming it to Waikiki, just remember Heaven has high tariffs, but the ocean, sun, and sand really do offer all you need.

Rent Report
Honolulu

November 2020 Honolulu Rent Report

Welcome to the November 2020 Honolulu Rent Report. Honolulu rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Honolulu rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Honolulu rents decline sharply over the past month

Honolulu rents have declined 1.6% over the past month, and are down significantly by 3.6% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Honolulu stand at $1,495 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,986 for a two-bedroom. This is the second straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in August. Honolulu's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -2.8%, as well as the national average of -1.4%.

    Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Honolulu

    As rents have fallen significantly in Honolulu, large cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Compared to most large cities across the country, Honolulu is less affordable for renters.

    • Honolulu's median two-bedroom rent of $1,986 is above the national average of $1,101. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.4% over the past year compared to the 3.6% decline in Honolulu.
    • While rents in Honolulu fell significantly over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Detroit (+3.5%) and Phoenix (+3.3%).
    • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Honolulu than most large cities. For example, Detroit has a median 2BR rent of $895, where Honolulu is more than twice that price.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    November 2020 Honolulu Rent Report

    Welcome to the November 2020 Honolulu Rent Report. Honolulu rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Honolulu rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    View full Rent Report

    November 2020 Honolulu Rent Report

    Welcome to the November 2020 Honolulu Rent Report. Honolulu rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Honolulu rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

    Honolulu rents decline sharply over the past month

    Honolulu rents have declined 1.6% over the past month, and are down significantly by 3.6% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Honolulu stand at $1,495 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,986 for a two-bedroom. This is the second straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in August. Honolulu's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -2.8%, as well as the national average of -1.4%.

      Many large cities nationwide show more affordable rents compared to Honolulu

      As rents have fallen significantly in Honolulu, large cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Compared to most large cities across the country, Honolulu is less affordable for renters.

      • Honolulu's median two-bedroom rent of $1,986 is above the national average of $1,101. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.4% over the past year compared to the 3.6% decline in Honolulu.
      • While rents in Honolulu fell significantly over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Detroit (+3.5%) and Phoenix (+3.3%).
      • Renters will generally find more expensive prices in Honolulu than most large cities. For example, Detroit has a median 2BR rent of $895, where Honolulu is more than twice that price.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

      Honolulu Renter Confidence Survey
      National study of renter’s satisfaction with their cities and states

      Here’s how Honolulu ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      B-
      Safety and crime rate
      B
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A-
      Recreational activities
      C+
      Social Life
      A+
      Weather
      B-
      Commute time
      C
      State and local taxes
      A
      Public transit

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Honolulu’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Honolulu renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Honolulu, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Honolulu include the following:

      • Honolulu renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Honolulu were weather (A+), public transit (A) and recreational activities (A-).
      • The areas of concern to Honolulu renters are affordability, pet-friendliness and quality of local schools, which all received grades of F.
      • Honolulu did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Miami (C+), Long Beach (C+) and Las Vegas (C).
        • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "I love the weather and all of the outdoor activities!" -Jade G.
      • "We love the weather and beaches, but the cost of living is a big burden." -Tom S.
      • "I love the people and the culture of Honolulu. But I hate the traffic and lack of nightlife." -Michael T.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.
      Read More

      Renter Confidence Survey

      Apartment List has released Honolulu’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Honolulu renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment Li...

      View full Honolulu Renter Survey

      Here’s how Honolulu ranks on:

      B
      Overall satisfaction
      B-
      Safety and crime rate
      B
      Jobs and career opportunities
      A-
      Recreational activities
      C+
      Social Life
      A+
      Weather
      B-
      Commute time
      C
      State and local taxes
      A
      Public transit

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Honolulu’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Honolulu renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "However, ratings varied greatly across different categories, indicating that even though renters love Honolulu, some aspects can be better."

      Key Findings in Honolulu include the following:

      • Honolulu renters gave their city a B overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Honolulu were weather (A+), public transit (A) and recreational activities (A-).
      • The areas of concern to Honolulu renters are affordability, pet-friendliness and quality of local schools, which all received grades of F.
      • Honolulu did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Miami (C+), Long Beach (C+) and Las Vegas (C).
        • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "I love the weather and all of the outdoor activities!" -Jade G.
      • "We love the weather and beaches, but the cost of living is a big burden." -Tom S.
      • "I love the people and the culture of Honolulu. But I hate the traffic and lack of nightlife." -Michael T.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.