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1023 apartments for rent near Baltimore, MD

Studio
$1,342
1 Bed
$1,373
2 Bed
$2,185
Studio
$875
1 Bed
$1,065
2 Bed
$1,470
Studio
$1,377
1 Bed
$1,577
2 Bed
$2,963
Studio
$1,600
1 Bed
$1,750
2 Bed
$2,400
1 Bed
$900
2 Bed
$1,125
1 Bed
$1,288
2 Bed
$1,829
1 Bed
$760
2 Bed
$1,035
3 Bed
$1,380
1 Bed
$1,360
2 Bed
$1,730
3 Bed
Ask
Studio
Ask
1 Bed
$1,199
2 Bed
$1,449
1 Bed
$905
2 Bed
$950
3 Bed
$1,140
Studio
$1,489
1 Bed
$1,557
2 Bed
$2,366
Studio
$905
1 Bed
$1,145
2 Bed
$1,560
Studio
Ask
1 Bed
$1,427
2 Bed
$1,336
Studio
Ask
1 Bed
$1,388
2 Bed
$1,616
Studio
$1,273
1 Bed
$1,374
2 Bed
$1,721
Studio
Ask
1 Bed
$2,338
2 Bed
$3,258
Studio
$1,755
1 Bed
$1,735
2 Bed
Ask
1 Bed
$1,909
2 Bed
$1,656
3 Bed
$2,390
1 Bed
$860
2 Bed
$1,020
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City Guide
Baltimore
O Renter, Where Art Thou?

Baltimore landlords and apartment managers typically ask for a six-month lease and a deposit to match a month’s rent. Ask about utilities and expect to pay over $100/month for A/C in the summer and the same for heat in the winter (possibly more if your place is older and uses oil: talk about “historic features”!). Finally, expect to sit on a waiting list (up to a year, at longest) if you’re interested in a rowhouse in a popular area. If you simply can’t wait, consider the (newer, if possible) apartment complexes, which boast a higher turnover rate. Neighborhoods you should know about include the following:

Central: If you’re simply rollin’ in it and want to be able to taunt the crabs in Chesapeake Bay from your bathroom window, you won’t be satisfied with anything less than the Inner Harbor. Expect valet parking and all utilities included for $1600/month (1BR/1BA) or $1850/month (2BR/1BA). Second best in central Baltimore City is the Mount Vernon-Belvedere area. This area has an upscale (gorgeous old homes get friendly with blocks of apartments complexes), bohemian (hipster and artist central) vibe that mixes artsy quirk with higher education (JHU borders these hoods to the north). Bolton Hill is a collegiate-stunner with two universities, gilded statues, historic architecture and peaceful tree-lined streets. Lots of studios in this neighborhood, ranging from $650/month in some cases to $1100/month for all-inclusive units. Double-up and it gets even less expensive: 2BR/1BAs regularly go for less than $1000/month.

South: If you can’t afford a high rise in the Inner Harbor but need to be close to Downtown, look south. No, not that far—there, where the Ft. McHenry Tunnel hops over to Fells Point. That’s Locust Point; take a few steps to the left and you’re in West Federal Hill. These areas boast lots of working professionals, pubs and restaurants, but lack that yacht-crooning retirement crowd that too often characterizes South Baltimore in residents’ minds. You won’t pay under a thousand for anything out here, no matter how many (or few) bedrooms. But you might be able to snag a 2BR/1BA with a view for about $1600/month in Locust Point. Fed Hill will be slightly higher priced for the same.

North: On either side of Johns Hopkins University sit older, historic neighborhoods gentrified by young, artsy types. West of JH gets you into Wyman Park and the Hampden area; east are Abell and Charles Village (the even northerner expansion from North Charles). Things start to feel suburbany outside the expressway; but what one loses of urbanity, one gains in verdancy—it’s parks and greenspaces galore in north Balmer. Expect to pay a premium for the Abell experience (you’ll likely be fighting graduate students for the 1BRs, which run from $850 up to $1250/month). Hampden’s a little more doable: one can usually find both 1BR and 2BR/1BA apartments (sometimes even row homes!) for less than $1000/month. Johns Hopkins, Charles Village, Woodberry, if you actually like suburbia, check out Homeland: it’s a less creepy-feeling planned neighborhood a little farther north. Just be willing to drop at least a grand per month to drive past that fancy-pants sign to get to your 1BR.

Southeast: Second to North Baltimore for youngsters, Southeast has some fabulous neighborhoods. Fells Point is the choicest area: it would be unsurprising to pay over $1500/month for a 1BR (all utilities and parking in a garage included, of course). If you’re looking for parking anywhere besides the garage, you’re out of luck here. Thankfully, the area is fairly walkable and you can get all the perks of living in a major city: harbor views, posh nightlife, delicious food, luxury condos, chic shopping and even a charming Little Italy. If this is outside your budget, check out Brewer’s Hill or Canton, although these have less apartment complexes than rooms available in houses. Patterson Park is ideal for dog-owners and runners; 1BRs near the park start at $800/month, 2BRs go from $1250/month.

Sold on your new neighborhood? Wonderful. Round up the neighbors, make a peach cake, and put the O’s game on. Easy, wasn’t it?

Baltimore Renter Confidence Survey
National study of renter confidence in the economy, homeownership, and cities
Here's how Baltimore ranks on:
C- Plans for homeownership
D City satisfaction
F Confidence in the local economy
D Safety and crime rate
B Access to recreational activities
C Quality of schools
B- State and local taxes
B+ Satisfaction with daily commute
Best Worst
Full data available when viewing on a non-mobile device.
Overview of Findings

Apartment List has released Baltimore's results from the first annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. The survey, which drew on responses from over 18,000 renters, provides new insights into what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the 105 million American renters nationwide.

"Baltimore renters are dissatisfied with their city, which has likely only been worsened by rioting and disputes with the police in the Spring of 2015," says Andrew Tam, Vice President of Data Science at Apartment List. "The US renter population is at its highest level in 20 years, and Baltimore's generally low rankings across the board coupled with extremely low confidence in the local economy are cause for concern for this large demographic."

Key findings in Baltimore include the following:

  • Baltimore renters give their city a D overall, ranking the city 89th out of 100 cities nationwide in our study.
  • Baltimore earned an F for confidence in the local economy, with just 9% of renters saying that it's on the right track. This ranks the city 97th (4th from last) in our study.
  • Influenced by lack of confidence in the local economy, Baltimore earned a C- for homeownership, with only 53% of respondents saying they plan to purchase an apartment or home in the future.
  • One of Baltimore's highest grade is a B for access to recreational opportunities, possibly because of access to amenities such as Inner Harbor and Camden Yards.
  • Baltimore in the bottom decile for safety, with only 35% of respondents expressing satisfaction with the city's safety and crime rate.
  • Three Maryland cities were ranked in our study: Silver Spring (A-), College Park (C+) and Baltimore (D).
  • The top rated cities nationwide for city satisfaction were Plano, TX; Boston, MA; Arlington, VA; Austin, TX; and Torrance, CA. The lowest rated cities were Newark, NJ; New Haven, CT; Bridgeport, CT; Hartford, CT; and Columbia, SC.

A detailed report explaining the survey's methodology, analysis, and findings is available upon request. To obtain a copy, please email Andrew Tam, Apartment List's Vice President of Data Science, at andrew@apartmentlist.com.