91 Apartments for rent in Topeka, KS

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Last updated November 25 at 11:30am UTC
2416 SW Moundview Dr
West Southwest 3
Topeka, KS
Updated November 25 at 11:19am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$700
2706 SW Burnett Road
West Southwest 3
Topeka, KS
Updated November 25 at 11:21am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$1,050
739 SW Vesper Ave.
Central Topeka
Topeka, KS
Updated November 25 at 11:30am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$850
1132 NE Wabash Ave
Oakland
Topeka, KS
Updated November 23 at 5:52pm UTC
3 Bedrooms
$725
4804 SW 18th Terrace
West Southwest 3
Topeka, KS
Updated November 23 at 9:53am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$795
1029 SW Plass Ave.
Norton
Topeka, KS
Updated November 25 at 11:24am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$575
516 NE Twiss Ave
Oakland
Topeka, KS
Updated November 25 at 11:25am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$725
2508 SE Maryland Ave
Central Highland Park
Topeka, KS
Updated November 24 at 11:24am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$525
3399 SE Irvingham St
Highland Crest
Topeka, KS
Updated November 23 at 9:53am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$595
5217 SW 12th Terrace
West Southwest 2
Topeka, KS
Updated November 23 at 5:52pm UTC
1 Bedroom
$445
3121 SW Macvicar Ave
South/Southeast 1
Topeka, KS
Updated November 24 at 11:15am UTC
1 Bedroom
$495
2016 SW 70th Terrace
Topeka
Topeka, KS
Updated November 23 at 5:52pm UTC
2 Bedrooms
$650
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City Guide
Topeka
Topeka:

Some of the finer privileges of life in Topeka include:

You can build up your bankroll: The cost of living in the city is 15 percentage points lower than the national average, while 1BR and even 2BR units rarely cost more than 600-700 bucks.

Capital security: Unlike neighboring cities who must constantly be wary of local businesses packing up shop and heading for supposedly sunnier pastures, Topekans may rest assured that their biggest employer – the State of Kansas capital building – is here for good. Topeka stands as one of the Midwest’s more economically stable communities.

Say goodbye to gridlock: Topeka residents spend on average a mere 18 minutes trekking to and from work each day and enjoy one of the state’s more reliable public transportation systems. With 15 stops throughout the area and charging as little as $22 for a monthly pass, the Topeka Metro has become an increasingly savvy choice for commuters.

Entertainment: For those who prefer their fun in the sun, Topeka serves up plenty of parks, lakes, museums, a motor sports complex, and a pretty cool zoo.

Some Tidbits for Tenants

If you’re still reading, it means you’re ready to find yourself a killer pad. A few pointers to help make your apartment hunting experience silky-smooth:

Be a bargain shopper: The types of renting specials you’ll come across are pretty much unheard-of in other parts of the Midwest, as even 3 BR units in Topeka are available in the $800 range. Studios rarely go for over $400 and quality 1BR and 2 BR units rarely exceed $600-$700. And because the number of rental properties outnumbers the number of renters by far, you’ll come across no shortage of leasing options. Don’t settle on anything until you’re sure it’s the perfect fit for you.

Don’t waste away on waiting lists: Topeka isn’t the kind of city that sees a large turnover of residents, so if (in the very rare case) you have to get on a waiting list before moving into a place, just shrug it off and walk away. A ton of other landlords will practically beg you to move in immediately.

Consider the alternatives: Apartments aren’t your only renting options in Topeka. Why not look into leasing a single-family detached home, instead? Plenty are available, and the cost for a multi-BR home is often comparable to that of an apartment.

Arm yourself with credentials… it’s worth it: You’ll need (obvious statement alert!) proper I.D. to rent a place in Topeka, as well as proof of income and (sometimes) proof of rental history. What you’ll get in exchange for this minor inconvenience is, among other things, plenty of room to kick your feet up. Topeka is a spacious, spread out city, and its apartments are no different: Most multi-BR units are at least 1200 square feet, and even studio units typically offer 600-plus square feet of living space.

The Lay of the Land

Generally, the further west/southwest you travel in Topeka, the more you’ll find the bulk of the city’s shopping centers, banks, and eateries, while the more urban-minded domiciles are centered closer to downtown. Be sure to scout out not only your potential nesting place but also your overall neighborhood before relocating to Topeka. If you want to live in the greater metro area just outside city limits, districts like Jefferson West, Seaman, and Auburn-Washburn offer viable rental options as well, although they come at a slightly more elevated price (usually closer to a grand).

Some Completely Irrelevant Information

In the Kansa Native American tongue, Topeka means “a place to grow good potatoes.” So take that, Idaho!

The city unofficially renamed itself “Google, Kansas” for a month in 2010 in an attempt to sway the technology giant to choose Topeka as the site for a massive fiber optics experiment. Sadly, Google picked neighboring Kansas City, Kansas instead. Gee, thanks, Google.

Finally, Topeka is a frequent player in Stephen King novels (but is not as nearly as creepy as the author makes it sound).

Need-to-know information? Of course not! We just thought you’d like to have something to chat about.

In any case, welcome to Topeka and happy hunting!

Rent Report
Topeka

November 2017 Topeka Rent Report

Welcome to the November 2017 Topeka Rent Report. Topeka rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Topeka rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Topeka rents declined significantly over the past month

Topeka rents have declined 0.6% over the past month, and are down moderately by 0.7% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Topeka stand at $580 for a one-bedroom apartment and $770 for a two-bedroom. This is the second straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in August. Topeka's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 1.9%, as well as the national average of 2.7%.

Topeka rents more affordable than many large cities nationwide

As rents have fallen moderately in Topeka, many large cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Topeka is also more affordable than most large cities across the country.

  • Topeka's median two-bedroom rent of $770 is below the national average of $1,160. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.7% over the past year compared to the 0.7% decline in Topeka.
  • While rents in Topeka fell moderately over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Seattle (+4.2%), Phoenix (+4.1%), and Dallas (+2.6%).
  • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Topeka than most large cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $3,070, which is nearly four times the price in Topeka.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.