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104 Apartments for rent in Boise, ID

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Last updated July 26 at 9:43PM
12011 W Overland Rd
Southwest Ada County Alliance
Boise, ID
Updated July 22 at 9:58AM
2 Bedrooms
$995
851 W Front St #704
Downtown Boise City
Boise, ID
Updated July 18 at 9:46AM
1 Bedroom
$1,225
6437 S Paperbirch Ave
Southeast Boise
Boise, ID
Updated July 20 at 1:16PM
3 Bedrooms
$1,625
584 S Dalton Ln
Maple Grove - Franklin
Boise, ID
Updated July 26 at 1:39AM
2 Bedrooms
$995
2444 Bogus Basin Rd
Highlands
Boise, ID
Updated July 17 at 10:18AM
4 Bedrooms
$2,300
2472 Bogus Basin Rd
Highlands
Boise, ID
Updated July 10 at 10:00AM
4 Bedrooms
$2,000
9684 W Touchstone Dr
Southwest Ada County Alliance
Boise, ID
Updated July 26 at 1:39AM
3 Bedrooms
$1,375
1301 E. State St.
East End
Boise, ID
Updated July 26 at 10:52AM
2 Bedrooms
$1,400
6033 W Opohonga St
Boise
Boise, ID
Updated July 25 at 1:35AM
2 Bedrooms
$895
7810 W Preece Dr
Boise
Boise, ID
Updated July 26 at 1:39AM
3 Bedrooms
$1,400
2509 W Bannock St
Veterans Park
Boise, ID
Updated July 25 at 1:34AM
1 Bedroom
$825
9853 Sunflower Ln
West Valley
Boise, ID
Updated July 18 at 10:00AM
3 Bedrooms
$1,195
3127 Sweetwater Dr
Southeast Boise
Boise, ID
Updated July 6 at 12:46PM
4 Bedrooms
$2,200
6148 Rising Sun Ave
Southwest Ada County Alliance
Boise, ID
Updated July 18 at 10:00AM
3 Bedrooms
$1,325
E Victory Rd
Southeast Boise
Boise, ID
Updated July 20 at 9:39AM
3 Bedrooms
$1,300
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City Guide
Boise
Neighborhoods: Finding a Room with a View

The Bench: Just south of Downtown is the area known as “the Bench.” Named after the sudden increase in elevation, resembling a step, or more accurately, a bench (It’s not called “the step,” now is it?), The Bench (or Benches) was created long ago as a shoreline to the Boise River. These days, The Bench is home to many residential neighborhoods, mainly consisting of older, single-family houses built between the ‘60s- ‘80s, with a few newer homes and apartment complexes mixed in. Depending on where you’re looking, rent prices can vary greatly. West Bench tends to be more expensive, while Central Bench is more wallet-friendly and offers many apartment and home rental choices.

West Boise: The West end of Boise happens to be the flattest section, but this doesn’t refer to the lifestyle or nightlife in the area. With an abundance of strip malls, restaurants and bars, West Boise offers many places to call home. New housing subdivisions and apartment and condo complexes are available in West Boise in neighborhoods like West Valley. It is also the perfect area for those with a bit of a shopping bug, as it’s home to Boise Towne Square Mall, the largest mall in the state.

Southeast: Southeast Boise offers a little something for everyone. Surprise Valley* is located on the Boise River, with a mix of housing. Another reason this area is desirable is because it is central (about 15 minutes away) from all areas in Boise, making it easy to head to the river, the mountains, the greenbelt and downtown.

Downtown: In most cities, living downtown is considered chic. It is no different in Boise. The cultural center and the heartbeat of all things hip in Boise, downtown is home to the business district and high-rise apartments. Areas such as 8th Street are home to sidewalk cafes and restaurants, as well as bars and boutiques. Living here, you’ll have an all-access pass to farmer’s markets, jazz festivals and nightlife.

North End: If you looking for old, historic and classic, this end of Boise is for you. The homes here were built in the 1920s and ‘30s and sit on tree-lined streets (like the much-coveted Harrison Boulevard). While there are an abundance of single-family homes and homes with large yards in the area, there are also apartment complexes to choose from. Close enough to the downtown area to capture a view (Downtown Boise is visible from Camel's Back Park), the North End is a bit more costly than other Boise areas. This area plays host to special events and street fairs throughout the year. In 2008, the American Planning Association proclaimed Boise's North End to be one of “10 Great Neighborhoods”.

Four Seasons

Winter, spring, summer and fall (no, we aren’t singing James Taylor), this city features them all. Hot, dry summers are followed by cool fall temperatures. However, fall is the shortest season here, as winter slips in fast and the city becomes snow-covered. Because the summer and winter temperatures can be extreme in the Treasure Valley, be sure that the apartment or home you rent has central heating and A/C rather than window units or baseboard heaters. It may cause your electric bill to be a bit higher but it’ll be worth every penny in the dead of winter or the middle of a 100 degree summer.

Navigating through the Treasure Valley

When it comes to transportation, most residents rely on a good set of wheels to maneuver through bumper-to-bumper traffic. Although not as grid-locked as other top one-hundo cities, (the average commute time is 20 minutes) Boise has its fair share of traffic along I-84, the city’s main highway. This interstate also connects Boise with Portland, Oregon and Salt Lake City, Utah. For those looking to reduce their carbon footprint, take comfort in the fact that Boise has a network of bike paths, or greenways, throughout the city and surrounding regions, such as the Boise River Greenbelt, which runs along the banks of the Boise River and connects one end of the city to the other.

Rent Report
Boise

July 2017 Boise Rent Report

Welcome to the July 2017 Boise Rent Report. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Boise rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Boise rents increase sharply over the past month

Boise rents have increased 0.7% over the past month, and are up significantly by 4.8% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Boise stand at $700 for a one-bedroom apartment and $890 for a two-bedroom. This is the sixth straight month that the city has seen rent increases after a decline in December of last year. Boise's year-over-year rent growth leads the state average of 4.6%, as well as the national average of 2.9%.

Boise rents more affordable than many other large cities nationwide

As rents have increased in Boise, a few similar cities nationwide have seen rents grow more modestly, or in some cases, even decline. Boise is still more affordable than most comparable cities across the country.

  • Boise's median two-bedroom rent of $890 is below the national average of $1,150. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.9% over the past year.
  • While Boise's rents rose over the past year, some cities nationwide saw decreases, including Miami (-1.1%) and San Francisco (-0.6%).
  • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Boise than most similar cities. Comparably, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $3,040, which is nearly three-and-a-half times the price in Boise.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.