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Last updated December 3 2020 at 11:39 PM

327 Apartments for rent in Princeton, NJ

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Check out 327 verified apartments for rent in Princeton, NJ with rents starting as low as $1600. Some apartments for rent in Princeton might offer rent specials. Look out for the
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Verified
17 Units Available
Parc at Princeton Junction
3000 Goldfinch Blvd
Princeton, NJ
1 Bedroom
$2,162
767 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,614
1149 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:34 PM
Parc at Princeton Junction, an upscale community by Toll Brothers Apartment Living, puts you at the center of everything - your work, your fun, and your life.
$
Verified
37 Units Available
The Mews at Princeton Junction
900 Wessex Place
Princeton, NJ
1 Bedroom
$1,845
785 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,945
1157 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,250
1324 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:33 PM
One- to three-bedroom apartment homes with walk-in closets, in-unit laundry and fireplaces. Pet-friendly, with tennis courts, gym and pool. Just south of Highway 1, a short distance from Princeton University. Easy access to major freeways.
Verified
12 Units Available
Avalon Princeton
100 Albert Way
Princeton, NJ
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$2,390
860 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$3,000
1277 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 01:05 PM
Community Park North and Westminster Choir School are just minutes from this property. The recently renovated units are furnished and have hardwood flooring. There's a pool, yoga studio and 24-hour gym in this smoke-free community.
Verified
6 Units Available
Barclay Square
1900 Barclay Blvd
Princeton, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$2,530
1423 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$3,745
1929 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:18 AM
Find studio, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments for rent at Barclay Square in Princeton. View photos, descriptions and more!
1 Unit Available
216 WILLIAM LIVINGSTON COURT
216 William Livingston Ct
Princeton, NJ
3 Bedrooms
$2,600
1926 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Located a few minutes from Palmer Square. Spacious 3 bedroom and 2.5 baths townhouse. Princeton Regional Schools. Updated eat-in kitchen with stainless appliances. Spacious Living Room and Dining room.
1 Unit Available
18 VANDEVENTER AVENUE
18 Vandeventer Avenue
Princeton, NJ
1 Bedroom
$1,900
1630 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
The interior square footage listed herewith is incorrect and I could not change it. The MLS has listed the square footage of the entire building not this apartment. This apartment has approx. 600 square feet. Eat-In Kitchen, Living Room, Bedroom.
1 Unit Available
153 WITHERSPOON STREET
153 Witherspoon Street
Princeton, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$4,800
1846 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Studio Hillier's Latest In Town Creation-Ready For Occupancy! Three sleek, smartly designed townhomes of various sizes with multiple floors and roof top patios.
1 Unit Available
35 QUARRY ST
35 Quarry Street
Princeton, NJ
1 Bedroom
$2,450
900 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Fabulous 3rd floor apartment at the historical Waxwood Building just a couple blocks from bustling downtown Princeton! Secure entry foyer, parking for one car, storage locker for each apartment, elevator access, and common courtyard for outdoor
1 Unit Available
49 PALMER SQUARE W
49 Palmer Square West
Princeton, NJ
Studio
$1,600
231 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
In the HEART OF TOWN! Third floor Palmer Square FURNISHED studio apartment. MINIMUM 12-MONTH LEASE! Hardwood floors, kitchenette, updated bathroom, lovely outside terrace with reflecting pool for relaxation.
1 Unit Available
164 NASSAU STREET
164 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ
1 Bedroom
$1,900
500 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Princeton Rental in the Heart of Downtown. This 1 Bedroom + Office has a great Location and includes an updated Kitchen and Bathroom. The Updated Kitchen includes New Cabinets, Counter tops and Subway tile back splash.
1 Unit Available
502 CHERRY VALLEY ROAD
502 Cherry Valley Road
Princeton, NJ
7 Bedrooms
$10,000
6599 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Live the Lifestyle You Have Imagined in this Stunning 6600 Square Foot Custom Built Center-Hall Colonial. This North Facing Full Brick Mansion features, 7 Bedrooms and 5 1/2 Bathrooms. Can Sleep 12 Students.
1 Unit Available
35 MORAN AVENUE
35 Moran Avenue
Princeton, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$2,300
814 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Sweet Bungalow downtown with driveway parking! Recently refreshed within last two years, hardwood flooring all refinished, freshly painted throughout, new carpet installed in front porch, new kitchen floor and new stove.
1 Unit Available
15 Chestnut St
15 Chestnut Street
Princeton, NJ
4 Bedrooms
$4,500
2000 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:36 AM
Avail June. 4 BR House off Nassau. Walk to town - Property Id: 422623 Looking for someone to rent my house on a short-term basis. The longest the term could be is September 1, 2021. The house has four bedrooms, 3.
Results within 1 mile of Princeton
1 Unit Available
168 WINDHAM COURT
168 Windham Court
Somerset County, NJ
3 Bedrooms
$3,000
1987 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Princeton Village Offering a wonderful end unit townhouse for rent. This townhouse offer 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths, finished basement, attached garage and slider to large deck from living room.
1 Unit Available
16 COLEBROOK COURT
16 Colebrook Court
Mercer County, NJ
3 Bedrooms
$2,850
1976 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
At Canal Pointe Freshly painted & Totally updated Plaza model offers Three bedrooms Two and half bath, One car Garage is ready for Immediate occupancy.
1 Unit Available
28 RICHARDS ROAD
28 Richards Road
Mercer County, NJ
4 Bedrooms
$2,895
1990 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Find studio, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments for rent at 28 RICHARDS ROAD in Mercer County. View photos, descriptions and more!
1 Unit Available
302 TRINITY COURT
302 Trinity Court
Mercer County, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$1,750
1050 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
3rd floor 2 bedrooms, 1 full bath penthouse in Canal Pointe. Living room with fireplace, sliders to private deck. Large master suite with walk-in closet. Washer/Dryer, Storage, Central air, Swim pool, and Tennis.
1 Unit Available
13 CANAL VIEW DRIVE
13 Canal View Drive
Mercer County, NJ
3 Bedrooms
$3,000
2089 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Gorgeous 3 BR home convenient to Princeton, Route 1, shopping and train shuttle. Light and airy open floor plan. Everything has been replaced and is only 3 yrs old. New kitchen with maple finish cabinets, granite counters and new appliances.
1 Unit Available
2217 WINDROW DRIVE
2217 Windrow Drive
Middlesex County, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$4,800
1469 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Find studio, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments for rent at 2217 WINDROW DRIVE in Middlesex County. View photos, descriptions and more!
1 Unit Available
110 LOWELL COURT
110 Lowell Court
Mercer County, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$2,000
1100 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
Lovely third floor penthouse in Canal Pointe. Well maintained, with newer ac/furnace and water heater, both bathrooms renovated with tile floor, updated vanities and lighting.
1 Unit Available
104 OLYMPIC COURT
104 Olympic Court
Mercer County, NJ
2 Bedrooms
$1,850
1183 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 11:13 PM
First floor 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths condo in Colonnade Point. Living room with fireplace, sliders to patio with storage, large master suite with walk in closet and master bath with double vanity, utility room with full size washer and dryer.
Results within 5 miles of Princeton
Verified
15 Units Available
The Crossings at Hamilton Station
900 Grand Central Drive
Trenton, NJ | Franklin Park
1 Bedroom
$1,698
765 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,184
1449 sqft
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated December 3 at 11:33 PM
Now Leasing brand new 1& 2-Bedroom Apartments and 3-Bedroom/2.5 Bath Townhomes, The Crossings at Hamilton Station is located in prestigious Hamilton and just minutes away from Princeton.
Verified
15 Units Available
Hunters Glen Apartments
1109 Hunters Glen Dr
Plainsboro Center, NJ
1 Bedroom
$1,310
675 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,575
835 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 10:32 PM
Just off the golf course, near the waterfront. Recently renovated apartments include in-unit laundry, a patio or balcony, and walk-in closets. Fantastic community amenities such as a pool, playground and courtyard. Pet-friendly.
Verified
9 Units Available
The Mercer at Lawrence Station
100 Avalon Way
Lawrenceville, NJ
1 Bedroom
$1,700
839 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,060
1142 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,400
1390 sqft
Last updated December 3 at 10:32 PM
Quiet apartment complex located in the heart of Mercer County with a fitness center, heated swimming pool and sundeck. Units feature wall-to-wall carpeting, breakfast bars, gourmet kitchens and more.
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Find an apartment for rent in Princeton, NJ


Searching for an apartment for rent in Princeton, NJ? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 327 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Princeton. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Princeton apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Princeton, NJ apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Princeton?
Apartment Rentals in Princeton start at $1,600/month.
How much is rent in Princeton?
Apartment Rentals in Princeton start at $1,600/month.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Princeton?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Princeton apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Princeton?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Princeton apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Princeton properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Princeton properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Princeton?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Princeton.
How much should I pay for rent in Princeton?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Princeton.
How can I find off-campus housing in Princeton?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Princeton. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Princeton University, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, and Thomas Edison State University.
How can I find off-campus housing in Princeton?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Princeton. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Princeton University, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, and Thomas Edison State University.

City Guide

Princeton
"Carlton Banks: The dean from Princeton will be at school this weekend. Do you know what that means? / William 'Will' Smith: You'll be kissing some major butt? / Carlton Banks: Exactly." - Fresh Prince of Bel Air
"Carlton Banks: The dean from Princeton will be at school this weekend. Do you know what that means? / William 'Will' Smith: You'll be kissing some major butt? / Carlton Banks: Exactly." - Fresh Prince of Bel Air

Princeton, New Jersey, was quite possibly named after Princeton University -- no, wait, it was definitely named after Princeton University. It's also known as the city of opportunities -- not to be confused with the city of opportunists. Some of the mention-worthy institutes in the area are: Siemens Corporate Research, Opinion Research Corporation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Dow Jones and Company. Thanks to these institutes, and many more, the economy in Princeton and surrounding areas is pretty good. This makes the area highly sought-after by residents in neighboring New Jersey towns, as well as outsiders looking forward to starting a new life here. In fact, the area is so nice that even the Governor lives here (Governors traditionally live in the capital, which is Trenton), and who could blame him; have you seen New Jersey Drive? Perhaps the next-best thing about Princeton is the countless activities, shopping centers and restaurants. Everything is accessible by foot, bike, transit or car, so there's no need to ever leave the city to have fun.

If You're Looking to Move to Princeton

Princeton is a large town, and there's always a variety of properties up for grabs, so your search for apartments shouldn't be too onerous. You can find rental houses, townhouses, apartments, condos and even lofts in just about every area of the city.

Plentiful Rentals

There are plenty of apartments for rent in Princeton, but it's best to snatch one of these apartments before fall and summer. The best time to move to Princeton would be in the fall, although there are many apartments available for rent all year-round. Since this is a very residential area, many of the apartments are three or more floors high. (If you can't take heights, there are some that offer one-story rental apts.) All of these apartments have one or two bedrooms minimum; very few offer studio apartments so be prepared to look long and hard if you're looking for a studio. If you're going to travel back and forth from the downtown area, you should look for a property near public transportation. You may find a few options in Penns Neck, North Princeton and Cedar Grove.

Everything You Need to Score the Perfect Pad

While finding an apartment is easy, the application process is pretty much the same as it is anywhere else. However, many of the apartment complexes will not rent apartments to people with sub-prime credit scores. If your score is less than satisfactory (lower than 620) be prepared to have a co-signer who will be willing to help you out. Some building managers are willing to work with people in this position if they pay extra for the security deposit. To get through the application process, you need statements to prove your financial stability, references from your employer, friends and past landlord, and a polo sweater, Clarks, and a pair of khaki-colored Dickie's (these last items are optional but can set the right tone).

If You're Looking to Move to Princeton
+

Princeton is a large town, and there's always a variety of properties up for grabs, so your search for apartments shouldn't be too onerous. You can find rental houses, townhouses, apartments, condos and even lofts in just about every area of the city.

Plentiful Rentals

There are plenty of apartments for rent in Princeton, but it's best to snatch one of these apartments before fall and summer. The best time to move to Princeton would be in the fall, although there are many apartments available for rent all year-round. Since this is a very residential area, many of the apartments are three or more floors high. (If you can't take heights, there are some that offer one-story rental apts.) All of these apartments have one or two bedrooms minimum; very few offer studio apartments so be prepared to look long and hard if you're looking for a studio. If you're going to travel back and forth from the downtown area, you should look for a property near public transportation. You may find a few options in Penns Neck, North Princeton and Cedar Grove.

Everything You Need to Score the Perfect Pad

While finding an apartment is easy, the application process is pretty much the same as it is anywhere else. However, many of the apartment complexes will not rent apartments to people with sub-prime credit scores. If your score is less than satisfactory (lower than 620) be prepared to have a co-signer who will be willing to help you out. Some building managers are willing to work with people in this position if they pay extra for the security deposit. To get through the application process, you need statements to prove your financial stability, references from your employer, friends and past landlord, and a polo sweater, Clarks, and a pair of khaki-colored Dickie's (these last items are optional but can set the right tone).

Neighborhoods in Princeton

Princeton is a big town consisting of a few neighborhoods. Within city limits, these neighborhoods consist of North Princeton and Princeton Junction. On the outskirts, the most mention-worthy neighborhoods are Cedar Grove and Cox's Corner.

Cedar Grove: Most people travel to Cedar Grove to play a little baseball at Varsity Baseball Field or to enjoy the beautiful scenery at John Witherspoon Woods and Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve.

North Princeton: North Princeton is a neighborhood filled with private clinics, pharmacies and hospitals. You'll most likely pass through this area from downtown if you catch the 605 or the 655. Other than a load of medical centers, there isn't much to see here.

Princeton Junction: Another notable neighborhood is Princeton Junction. This area consists of Princeton Metropark, the Princeton Junction Amtrak, multiple fast-food huts (such as Subway, Bagel Hole and Dunkin Donuts) and the Rogers Preserve, located near Bear Brook. You can also get a pretty decent slice over here at El Johns Pizza and Sub Shop or Brother's Pizzeria.

Neighborhoods in Princeton
+

Princeton is a big town consisting of a few neighborhoods. Within city limits, these neighborhoods consist of North Princeton and Princeton Junction. On the outskirts, the most mention-worthy neighborhoods are Cedar Grove and Cox's Corner.

Cedar Grove: Most people travel to Cedar Grove to play a little baseball at Varsity Baseball Field or to enjoy the beautiful scenery at John Witherspoon Woods and Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve.

North Princeton: North Princeton is a neighborhood filled with private clinics, pharmacies and hospitals. You'll most likely pass through this area from downtown if you catch the 605 or the 655. Other than a load of medical centers, there isn't much to see here.

Princeton Junction: Another notable neighborhood is Princeton Junction. This area consists of Princeton Metropark, the Princeton Junction Amtrak, multiple fast-food huts (such as Subway, Bagel Hole and Dunkin Donuts) and the Rogers Preserve, located near Bear Brook. You can also get a pretty decent slice over here at El Johns Pizza and Sub Shop or Brother's Pizzeria.

Living in Princeton

There is so much to do in this area that we literally wouldn't know where to begin. However, we will say that it's an area steeped in history, so there are a number of museums and government offices in the area, mainly in downtown Princeton. But we know exactly where to begin when it comes to filling up your stomach with delectables. You need to make a stop at the Blue Point Grill and grab yourself some Mussels & Pasta or a whole fish -- that's right, a whole fish to yourself if you really want! Be warned that the menu does change daily to reflect the fresh catch of the day! If you're not feeling seafood, have yourself a meal at Elements, whose chefs are 2014 James Beard semifinalists. If making decisions is something you struggle with, don't worry -- try the 6 Course Tasting Menu or the Chef's Tasting Menu. For a taste of Japanese, get yourself some chirashi at Ajihei and for some traditional pasta, get yourself over to Teresa Caffe.

If you're visiting Princeton, there are plenty of things to do. Most locals spend their time at the Carter Theater watching live performances or at the Princeton University Art Museum enjoying the latest oriental art installment. If you're not the artsy-fartsy type, get out and explore Princeton's natural beauty. If you want to get right in with some light jogging or biking, visit the 74-mile Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park. Here, you can run, bike, swim, fish and canoe. Other parks available to Princeton are Barbara Smoyer Memorial Park, Woodfield Reservation Park, and Princeton Battleground State Park, which is one of four parks in Princeton that has an arboretum. Looking to swim? Community South Park, Harrison Street Park and Mary Moss Park are your spots to be. If you're looking to shop instead, take your pick! Some of the more notable shops in the area are Palmer Square, Princeton Market Fair, Princeton Shopping Center and the Princeton Pilot Shop. Almost every shopping center is named after the town; how's that for a true Princetonian experience?

Getting around Princeton is pretty simple. Most people just jump on New Jersey Transit buses or the Princeton Branch Rail Line that runs to the local Princeton Junction station. Local service routes for the Princeton area are the 605 and 655. You can also catch a coach directly from Princeton to New York. For this trip, most people use USA Coach. Princeton students use the Freebie or Tiger Transit buses to get around near the campus.

If you're too good for buses or trains, and you'd rather show off your new set of wheels, then go right ahead. You can easily drive through the city using North Harrison Street. However, it tends to have a lot of traffic during rush hour. If you want to avoid this traffic, it's best to take the 206 -- also known as the scenic route -- north or southbound through Princeton. The reason the 206 is called the scenic route is because it passes through Community Park North, Community Park South and past multiple art museums.

Living in Princeton
+

There is so much to do in this area that we literally wouldn't know where to begin. However, we will say that it's an area steeped in history, so there are a number of museums and government offices in the area, mainly in downtown Princeton. But we know exactly where to begin when it comes to filling up your stomach with delectables. You need to make a stop at the Blue Point Grill and grab yourself some Mussels & Pasta or a whole fish -- that's right, a whole fish to yourself if you really want! Be warned that the menu does change daily to reflect the fresh catch of the day! If you're not feeling seafood, have yourself a meal at Elements, whose chefs are 2014 James Beard semifinalists. If making decisions is something you struggle with, don't worry -- try the 6 Course Tasting Menu or the Chef's Tasting Menu. For a taste of Japanese, get yourself some chirashi at Ajihei and for some traditional pasta, get yourself over to Teresa Caffe.

If you're visiting Princeton, there are plenty of things to do. Most locals spend their time at the Carter Theater watching live performances or at the Princeton University Art Museum enjoying the latest oriental art installment. If you're not the artsy-fartsy type, get out and explore Princeton's natural beauty. If you want to get right in with some light jogging or biking, visit the 74-mile Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park. Here, you can run, bike, swim, fish and canoe. Other parks available to Princeton are Barbara Smoyer Memorial Park, Woodfield Reservation Park, and Princeton Battleground State Park, which is one of four parks in Princeton that has an arboretum. Looking to swim? Community South Park, Harrison Street Park and Mary Moss Park are your spots to be. If you're looking to shop instead, take your pick! Some of the more notable shops in the area are Palmer Square, Princeton Market Fair, Princeton Shopping Center and the Princeton Pilot Shop. Almost every shopping center is named after the town; how's that for a true Princetonian experience?

Getting around Princeton is pretty simple. Most people just jump on New Jersey Transit buses or the Princeton Branch Rail Line that runs to the local Princeton Junction station. Local service routes for the Princeton area are the 605 and 655. You can also catch a coach directly from Princeton to New York. For this trip, most people use USA Coach. Princeton students use the Freebie or Tiger Transit buses to get around near the campus.

If you're too good for buses or trains, and you'd rather show off your new set of wheels, then go right ahead. You can easily drive through the city using North Harrison Street. However, it tends to have a lot of traffic during rush hour. If you want to avoid this traffic, it's best to take the 206 -- also known as the scenic route -- north or southbound through Princeton. The reason the 206 is called the scenic route is because it passes through Community Park North, Community Park South and past multiple art museums.

Read More

City Guide

Princeton
"Carlton Banks: The dean from Princeton will be at school this weekend. Do you know what that means? / William 'Will' Smith: You'll be kissing some major butt? / Carlton Banks: Exactly." - Fresh Prince of Bel Air
"Carlton Banks: The dean from Princeton will be at school this weekend. Do you know what that means? / William 'Will' Smith: You'll be kissing some major butt? / Carlton Banks: Exactly." - Fresh Prince of Bel Air

Princeton, New Jersey, was quite possibly named after Princeton University -- no, wait, it was definitely named after Princeton University. It's also known as the city of opportunities -- not to be confused with the city of opportunists. Some of the mention-worthy institutes in the area are: Siemens Corporate Research, Opinion Research Corporation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Dow Jones and Company. Thanks to these institutes, and many more, the economy in Princeton and surrounding areas is pretty good. This makes the area highly sought-after by residents in neighboring New Jersey towns, as well as outsiders looking forward to starting a new life here. In fact, the area is so nice that even the Governor lives here (Governors traditionally live in the capital, which is Trenton), and who could blame him; have you seen New Jersey Drive? Perhaps the next-best thing about Princeton is the countless activities, shopping centers and restaurants. Everything is accessible by foot, bike, transit or car, so there's no need to ever leave the city to have fun.

If You're Looking to Move to Princeton

Princeton is a large town, and there's always a variety of properties up for grabs, so your search for apartments shouldn't be too onerous. You can find rental houses, townhouses, apartments, condos and even lofts in just about every area of the city.

Plentiful Rentals

There are plenty of apartments for rent in Princeton, but it's best to snatch one of these apartments before fall and summer. The best time to move to Princeton would be in the fall, although there are many apartments available for rent all year-round. Since this is a very residential area, many of the apartments are three or more floors high. (If you can't take heights, there are some that offer one-story rental apts.) All of these apartments have one or two bedrooms minimum; very few offer studio apartments so be prepared to look long and hard if you're looking for a studio. If you're going to travel back and forth from the downtown area, you should look for a property near public transportation. You may find a few options in Penns Neck, North Princeton and Cedar Grove.

Everything You Need to Score the Perfect Pad

While finding an apartment is easy, the application process is pretty much the same as it is anywhere else. However, many of the apartment complexes will not rent apartments to people with sub-prime credit scores. If your score is less than satisfactory (lower than 620) be prepared to have a co-signer who will be willing to help you out. Some building managers are willing to work with people in this position if they pay extra for the security deposit. To get through the application process, you need statements to prove your financial stability, references from your employer, friends and past landlord, and a polo sweater, Clarks, and a pair of khaki-colored Dickie's (these last items are optional but can set the right tone).

If You're Looking to Move to Princeton
+

Princeton is a large town, and there's always a variety of properties up for grabs, so your search for apartments shouldn't be too onerous. You can find rental houses, townhouses, apartments, condos and even lofts in just about every area of the city.

Plentiful Rentals

There are plenty of apartments for rent in Princeton, but it's best to snatch one of these apartments before fall and summer. The best time to move to Princeton would be in the fall, although there are many apartments available for rent all year-round. Since this is a very residential area, many of the apartments are three or more floors high. (If you can't take heights, there are some that offer one-story rental apts.) All of these apartments have one or two bedrooms minimum; very few offer studio apartments so be prepared to look long and hard if you're looking for a studio. If you're going to travel back and forth from the downtown area, you should look for a property near public transportation. You may find a few options in Penns Neck, North Princeton and Cedar Grove.

Everything You Need to Score the Perfect Pad

While finding an apartment is easy, the application process is pretty much the same as it is anywhere else. However, many of the apartment complexes will not rent apartments to people with sub-prime credit scores. If your score is less than satisfactory (lower than 620) be prepared to have a co-signer who will be willing to help you out. Some building managers are willing to work with people in this position if they pay extra for the security deposit. To get through the application process, you need statements to prove your financial stability, references from your employer, friends and past landlord, and a polo sweater, Clarks, and a pair of khaki-colored Dickie's (these last items are optional but can set the right tone).

Neighborhoods in Princeton

Princeton is a big town consisting of a few neighborhoods. Within city limits, these neighborhoods consist of North Princeton and Princeton Junction. On the outskirts, the most mention-worthy neighborhoods are Cedar Grove and Cox's Corner.

Cedar Grove: Most people travel to Cedar Grove to play a little baseball at Varsity Baseball Field or to enjoy the beautiful scenery at John Witherspoon Woods and Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve.

North Princeton: North Princeton is a neighborhood filled with private clinics, pharmacies and hospitals. You'll most likely pass through this area from downtown if you catch the 605 or the 655. Other than a load of medical centers, there isn't much to see here.

Princeton Junction: Another notable neighborhood is Princeton Junction. This area consists of Princeton Metropark, the Princeton Junction Amtrak, multiple fast-food huts (such as Subway, Bagel Hole and Dunkin Donuts) and the Rogers Preserve, located near Bear Brook. You can also get a pretty decent slice over here at El Johns Pizza and Sub Shop or Brother's Pizzeria.

Neighborhoods in Princeton
+

Princeton is a big town consisting of a few neighborhoods. Within city limits, these neighborhoods consist of North Princeton and Princeton Junction. On the outskirts, the most mention-worthy neighborhoods are Cedar Grove and Cox's Corner.

Cedar Grove: Most people travel to Cedar Grove to play a little baseball at Varsity Baseball Field or to enjoy the beautiful scenery at John Witherspoon Woods and Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve.

North Princeton: North Princeton is a neighborhood filled with private clinics, pharmacies and hospitals. You'll most likely pass through this area from downtown if you catch the 605 or the 655. Other than a load of medical centers, there isn't much to see here.

Princeton Junction: Another notable neighborhood is Princeton Junction. This area consists of Princeton Metropark, the Princeton Junction Amtrak, multiple fast-food huts (such as Subway, Bagel Hole and Dunkin Donuts) and the Rogers Preserve, located near Bear Brook. You can also get a pretty decent slice over here at El Johns Pizza and Sub Shop or Brother's Pizzeria.

Living in Princeton

There is so much to do in this area that we literally wouldn't know where to begin. However, we will say that it's an area steeped in history, so there are a number of museums and government offices in the area, mainly in downtown Princeton. But we know exactly where to begin when it comes to filling up your stomach with delectables. You need to make a stop at the Blue Point Grill and grab yourself some Mussels & Pasta or a whole fish -- that's right, a whole fish to yourself if you really want! Be warned that the menu does change daily to reflect the fresh catch of the day! If you're not feeling seafood, have yourself a meal at Elements, whose chefs are 2014 James Beard semifinalists. If making decisions is something you struggle with, don't worry -- try the 6 Course Tasting Menu or the Chef's Tasting Menu. For a taste of Japanese, get yourself some chirashi at Ajihei and for some traditional pasta, get yourself over to Teresa Caffe.

If you're visiting Princeton, there are plenty of things to do. Most locals spend their time at the Carter Theater watching live performances or at the Princeton University Art Museum enjoying the latest oriental art installment. If you're not the artsy-fartsy type, get out and explore Princeton's natural beauty. If you want to get right in with some light jogging or biking, visit the 74-mile Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park. Here, you can run, bike, swim, fish and canoe. Other parks available to Princeton are Barbara Smoyer Memorial Park, Woodfield Reservation Park, and Princeton Battleground State Park, which is one of four parks in Princeton that has an arboretum. Looking to swim? Community South Park, Harrison Street Park and Mary Moss Park are your spots to be. If you're looking to shop instead, take your pick! Some of the more notable shops in the area are Palmer Square, Princeton Market Fair, Princeton Shopping Center and the Princeton Pilot Shop. Almost every shopping center is named after the town; how's that for a true Princetonian experience?

Getting around Princeton is pretty simple. Most people just jump on New Jersey Transit buses or the Princeton Branch Rail Line that runs to the local Princeton Junction station. Local service routes for the Princeton area are the 605 and 655. You can also catch a coach directly from Princeton to New York. For this trip, most people use USA Coach. Princeton students use the Freebie or Tiger Transit buses to get around near the campus.

If you're too good for buses or trains, and you'd rather show off your new set of wheels, then go right ahead. You can easily drive through the city using North Harrison Street. However, it tends to have a lot of traffic during rush hour. If you want to avoid this traffic, it's best to take the 206 -- also known as the scenic route -- north or southbound through Princeton. The reason the 206 is called the scenic route is because it passes through Community Park North, Community Park South and past multiple art museums.

Living in Princeton
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There is so much to do in this area that we literally wouldn't know where to begin. However, we will say that it's an area steeped in history, so there are a number of museums and government offices in the area, mainly in downtown Princeton. But we know exactly where to begin when it comes to filling up your stomach with delectables. You need to make a stop at the Blue Point Grill and grab yourself some Mussels & Pasta or a whole fish -- that's right, a whole fish to yourself if you really want! Be warned that the menu does change daily to reflect the fresh catch of the day! If you're not feeling seafood, have yourself a meal at Elements, whose chefs are 2014 James Beard semifinalists. If making decisions is something you struggle with, don't worry -- try the 6 Course Tasting Menu or the Chef's Tasting Menu. For a taste of Japanese, get yourself some chirashi at Ajihei and for some traditional pasta, get yourself over to Teresa Caffe.

If you're visiting Princeton, there are plenty of things to do. Most locals spend their time at the Carter Theater watching live performances or at the Princeton University Art Museum enjoying the latest oriental art installment. If you're not the artsy-fartsy type, get out and explore Princeton's natural beauty. If you want to get right in with some light jogging or biking, visit the 74-mile Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park. Here, you can run, bike, swim, fish and canoe. Other parks available to Princeton are Barbara Smoyer Memorial Park, Woodfield Reservation Park, and Princeton Battleground State Park, which is one of four parks in Princeton that has an arboretum. Looking to swim? Community South Park, Harrison Street Park and Mary Moss Park are your spots to be. If you're looking to shop instead, take your pick! Some of the more notable shops in the area are Palmer Square, Princeton Market Fair, Princeton Shopping Center and the Princeton Pilot Shop. Almost every shopping center is named after the town; how's that for a true Princetonian experience?

Getting around Princeton is pretty simple. Most people just jump on New Jersey Transit buses or the Princeton Branch Rail Line that runs to the local Princeton Junction station. Local service routes for the Princeton area are the 605 and 655. You can also catch a coach directly from Princeton to New York. For this trip, most people use USA Coach. Princeton students use the Freebie or Tiger Transit buses to get around near the campus.

If you're too good for buses or trains, and you'd rather show off your new set of wheels, then go right ahead. You can easily drive through the city using North Harrison Street. However, it tends to have a lot of traffic during rush hour. If you want to avoid this traffic, it's best to take the 206 -- also known as the scenic route -- north or southbound through Princeton. The reason the 206 is called the scenic route is because it passes through Community Park North, Community Park South and past multiple art museums.