Springfield, MO: 248 apartments available for rent

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Last updated June 27 at 9:52AM
2856 W Elm St
Westside
Springfield, MO
Updated June 16 at 9:56AM
2 Bedrooms
$500
1417 E McDaniel
Walnut Street
Springfield, MO
Updated June 22 at 8:43PM
3 Bedrooms
$1,050
1532 W Thoman St
Woodland
Springfield, MO
Updated June 12 at 8:17PM
2 Bedrooms
$500
2006 N Pickwick Ave
Robberson
Springfield, MO
Updated June 12 at 8:22PM
3 Bedrooms
$600
2131 W Atlantic St
Tom Watkins
Springfield, MO
Updated June 13 at 11:28AM
4 Bedrooms
$675
3970 W Groton St
Partners of Northwest Springfield
Springfield, MO
Updated June 19 at 11:17AM
4 Bedrooms
$875
538 W. Lynn
Grant Beach
Springfield, MO
Updated June 27 at 9:21AM
4 Bedrooms
$1,000
608 N Patterson Ave
Cooper Park
Springfield, MO
Updated June 27 at 9:27AM
2 Bedrooms
$475
2035 N Pickwick Ave
Robberson
Springfield, MO
Updated June 14 at 4:43PM
2 Bedrooms
$550
1839 N Hillcrest Ave
Tom Watkins
Springfield, MO
Updated June 15 at 11:33PM
3 Bedrooms
$675
2316 W Olive St
Westside
Springfield, MO
Updated June 12 at 8:23PM
2 Bedrooms
$500
2628 W Mount Vernon St
Westside
Springfield, MO
Updated June 12 at 8:31PM
2 Bedrooms
$550
5529 Lexington Ave S
Springfield
Springfield, MO
Updated June 27 at 9:52AM
3 Bedrooms
$1,295
2416 W. Nichols
Heart of the Westside
Springfield, MO
Updated June 15 at 11:35PM
4 Bedrooms
$800
4346 W Maple St
Frisco Highline
Springfield, MO
Updated June 22 at 9:30PM
2 Bedrooms
$525
2113 N East Ave
Robberson
Springfield, MO
Updated June 12 at 8:23PM
2 Bedrooms
$475
4426 W Billings St
Frisco Highline
Springfield, MO
Updated June 22 at 9:30PM
4 Bedrooms
$1,000
434 W Evergreen St
Doling Park
Springfield, MO
Updated June 22 at 9:13PM
3 Bedrooms
$650
1929 W Calhoun St
Heart of the Westside
Springfield, MO
Updated June 21 at 9:59AM
2 Bedrooms
$595
503 S Miller Rd
Young Lilly
Springfield, MO
Updated June 24 at 8:13AM
4 Bedrooms
$1,000
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City Guide
Springfield
The Basics

Luckily, for all the culture within, Springfield is often touted as having a low cost of living. In a city where almost half the population rents, housing can run pretty cheap on the whole, and you get a decent amount for what you pay.

The Spread

The average price range is about $350 - $1200 in the city, but for any ol’ average place you’re probably looking at about $500 - 600 a month, give or take. Rental homes are abundant, as well as apartment buildings of the larger variety. Two or three-flat buildings, mobile homes and duplexes are also an easy find, so rest assured that you have a lot of options to choose from. As a general rule, dwellings closer to the center of the city will be smaller, newer (or newly restored and renovated) and possibly more expensive, whereas further out will feel a lot more rural. Historic and vintage digs can be found, but most places are newer construction (1970s and onward) so they will be well equipped with appliances and amenities for your modern life.

One Stop Shopping

A unique feature to Springfield living is the utility system. All utilities (including electricity, natural gas, water, cable/phone/internet, and even public transit) are provided by one company: City Utilities of Springfield. Despite the arguable convenience, it’s not terribly difficult to bypass it altogether and find a place with all or many utilities included in the rent…except for public transit.

Getting Started

Now that we’ve established the “who” and the “what,” let’s get to the “where” and the “how.” By far, the most popular ways to find rentals in Springfield are through the Springfield News-Leader (the local newspaper) and online apartment hunting resources, like this website. Interestingly enough, there are also a few unlikely places you’ll find rental listings. Springfield has both official and unofficial city neighborhoods, many of which have their own neighborhood association website. Quite a few of these sites either have listings or contact information for realtors that specialize in that particular area. Of course, the hitch here is that you have to work with a realtor (which may be more trouble than it’s worth for a rental), and it’s essential to know what part of the city you’re interested in. We can’t really fix that first part, so let’s focus on the second one by getting you familiar with Springfield’s neighborhoods.

A Dip Into the Spring(field)

There are about 30 official city neighborhoods, so we’re going to focus in particular on a few rental-friendly areas to get you started…

Downtown: We’ll begin with the obvious. The lively and historic downtown Springfield is currently making a comeback. Old buildings have been restored and turned into retail, trendy boutiques, restaurants, galleries, and, abundantly, into cheap new loft apartments and housing (key word here is cheap!). Historic theatres, venues and businesses in the area are getting a facelift and a second chance, being supported by local events and festivals that bring in the crowds. Living downtown is a great option for those who like to be smack in the middle of everything. (itsalldowntown.com)

West Central: Just west of Downtown’s hustle and bustle, West Central is a mix of owners and renters filled with beautiful historic (and cheap!) houses. Rentals are denser on the eastern border with Downtown. Many neighborhood parks make for great biking and recreation, and access to downtown and nearby expressways makes for a short commute.

Grant Beach: Still considered an urban neighborhood due to its proximity to downtown, Grant Beach is an area of older rental houses, duplexes, and 2-flat buildings. Rents are higher than downtown, but by all means still affordable…we’re talking in the 400s, on average. (grantbeachneighborhood.org)

Ravenwood: Hey, not everybody wants to get caught up in the rush of the city; some of us desire a little rural flavor, or a more suburban existence. For the renter who knows what I’m talking about (You know who you are), you might want to check out Ravenwood. Rents are a little higher here, but much of the housing is newer. For that rural flavor we were just talking about, the Springfield Conservation Nature Center is just Southwest of this cozy community.

Phelps Grove: Tree lined streets are a common sight here, filled with bungalows and dotted with parks. It’s a little more expensive than other areas of the city, but finding a cheap place isn’t a stretch (phelpsneighborhood.org)

The Savvy Citizen

Here are a couple more scrumptious informational tidbits to keep in mind when considering making Springfield your home base.

Climate Control

One thing you’re likely to hear a lot about Springfield living is the weather. It’s been dubbed “the city with the most varied weather in the United States” by Forbes magazine’s 2007 list of America’s Wildest Weather Cities. While this can easily mean it has four distinct seasons (hey, that’s varied, right?) its location on the Springfield Plateau of the Ozarks makes for many windy days.

Transportation

The City Utilities of Springfield runs a small public bus system with about 14 daily routes and 4 night/evening routes to popular destinations. They don’t run 24/7, but are offered year-round every weekday, most on Saturdays, and some on Sundays. In closer-knit and urban sections of the city, such as downtown, walking or biking is common, but Springfield is definitely not a city for ditching your car. The overwhelming majority of citizens drive or carpool on a daily basis.

While it may not be the groundbreaking American metropolis that most of us come to imagine when we hear the words “big city”, Springfield is still a very prominent fixture in Southwestern Missouri. It serves as a central hub for hundreds of thousands of friendly folk, bringing shopping, culture, and urban life to the traditional American heartland. An interesting combination of flavors, indeed. Now get out there and find some sweet Springfield digs, the Queen City of the Ozarks is a’waitin’!

Rent Report
Springfield

June 2017 Springfield Rent Report

Welcome to the June 2017 Springfield Rent Report. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Springfield rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Springfield rents increase sharply over the past month

Springfield rents have increased 1.1% over the past month, and are up marginally by 0.5% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Springfield stand at $530 for a one-bedroom apartment and $690 for a two-bedroom. Springfield's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 1.7%, as well as the national average of 2.6%.

Springfield rents more affordable than many similar cities nationwide

Rent growth in Springfield has been relatively stable over the past year - some other large cities have seen more substantial increases, while in a few cases, rents have actually declined. Springfield is still more affordable than most comparable cities across the country.

  • Springfield's median two-bedroom rent of $690 is below the national average of $1,150. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.6% over the past year.
  • While rents in Springfield remained moderately stable this year, similar cities saw increases, including Seattle (+5.2%), Phoenix (+4.9%), Dallas (+3.2%); note that median 2BR rents in these cities go for $1,660, $1,020, and $1,090 respectively.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.