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90 Apartments for rent in Hamilton, OH

Last updated August 18 at 1:46am UTC
2416 Noble Avenue
East Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:49am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$945
130 North F Street,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:45am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$935
250 Timber Hill Drive
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:44am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,545
244 Timber Hill
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:44am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,545
256 Timber Hill Drive
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:43am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,545
64 Kensington Drive,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:43am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$1,395
725 Ridgelawn Avenue,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:42am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,125
416 Harrison Avenue,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:42am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$845
807 Glenway Drive
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 16 at 10:13am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,545
272 Timber Hill Drive
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 16 at 10:13am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,545
1219 Azel Avenue,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 16 at 10:11am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$725
1322 Southern Hills Boulevard,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 16 at 10:11am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$1,025
1324 Campbell Avenue,
East Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 14 at 9:58am UTC
1 Bedroom
$495
1025 Heaton Avenue,
East Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 14 at 9:51am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$725
424 Harrison Ave
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 11 at 10:03am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$795
24 Millville Avenue,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 10 at 9:28am UTC
1 Bedroom
$625
534 Gorham Drive,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 8 at 9:47am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,625
1050 Brough Avenue,
East Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 7 at 10:12am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$1,025
551 Franklin Street,
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 3 at 10:09am UTC
3 Bedrooms
$745
232 Timber Hill Drive
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 17 at 9:43am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$1,545
761 Ridgewood Ave
West Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 16 at 5:15pm UTC
3 Bedrooms
$995
816 Laurel Ave
East Hamilton
Hamilton, OH
Updated August 16 at 5:15pm UTC
3 Bedrooms
$975
City Guide
Hamilton
And the award for best use of an exclamation point goes to…

Hamilton, Ohio is the most exuberant city in the United States, as evidenced by the city council’s decision to legally place an exclamation point at the end of its name. It’s ‘Hamilton!’ now, and doesn’t that make you feel great about relocating to this small Ohio town of 60,000? The city is admittedly very industrial but is making great strides in the revitalization department, even declaring themselves the City of Sculpture and funding many new arts projects over the last few years. Located in the Cincinnati metro area, Hamilton! may not win any beauty contests, but it sure is trying, and you’ve got to love that.

Hamilton!’s History is Totally Bonkers

It’s truly a wonder that Hamilton! hasn’t been mined for an HBO television series yet, and we’ll tell you why: originally established as Fort Hamilton on the Great Miami River, Hamilton! quickly transitioned from an agricultural outpost to a major industrial city during the late 19th and early 20th centuries as manufacturers produced agricultural machinery to aid the remaining local farmers. The large flood of 1913 destroyed much of Hamilton!’s infrastructure and put a brief kibosh on the city’s economic boom. Boring so far. But wait–

Now here’s where things get really tawdry: unless you are approximately 100 years old or a local historian, you probably didn’t know that Hamilton! used to be nicknamed “Little Chicago.” Why? Well, it certainly wasn’t because of the wind. After the flood of 1913 when everything was in shambles and ostensibly pretty depressing, it’s alleged that several notorious Chicago gangsters invested in a district of ill repute in the city–we’re sure as part of some kind of economic revitalization project. As a result, gambling establishments and brothels abounded until well after World War II, when the city and its pleasures were actually declared off-limits to American servicemen. Really. This is all true. The script practically writes itself!

Hamilton Today? Not So Bonkers.

Despite the fact that you live in the only city with an exclamation point in its name, Hamilton! today is not exactly the wild, gambling, whoring town where gangsters run amok. Located just outside Cincinnati’s outer belt, the city is caught somewhere between nice, rural, historical town and suburban sprawl. The major monkey wrench in contemporary Hamilton!’s population is Miami University, located about 15 miles northwest in the town of Oxford, and Miami’s satellite campus located in southern part of the city. Thankfully, the constant influx of students in the nearby town has provided Hamilton! with some much-needed diversity.

Because Hamilton has gotten kind of sleepy in its old age, you’ll have to venture to nearby Oxford for the region’s restaurants and nightlife. However, the university town tends to skew a bit young and extremely sloppy when it comes to bars, so for a more refined time, do yourself and favor and drive the 45 minutes into Cincinnati.

Far too fancy for house parties.

The west side of Hamilton is generally considered the most desirable area in town. Proximity to Miami University means that a lot of faculty, staff and graduate students not interested in Oxford’s raucous house party scene and cheap beers have settled in this region for comfortable living and a quick commute. The Timber Hill area of the west side has a wide variety of newer apartment developments and a good reputation throughout the county. Additionally, Highland Park is another great neighborhood with older, established homes and the occasional rental. Two bedroom apartments on the north side generally range from $500-650.

Debatable presence of sauerkraut, but lots of history

Germantown Historical Village’s name does not lie—this part of Hamilton!, located close to downtown, is replete with beautiful old architecture from Hamilton!’s wild past. Part of the National Register of Historical Places, you’ll find over 150 Gothic Revival style residences, storefronts and generally cool old stuff, including the Lane Library—the oldest library west of the Alleghenies. Occasionally, some of these homes and adjacent residences have been divided into duplexes for renters, which make for seriously cool, possibly-haunted, homes. One bedrooms in this area generally go for $400-500.

Young punks and future scholars

Next, and probably last for many people, on Hamilton’s desirable communities list is the city’s south side. This area surrounds Hamilton!’s Miami University campus and has a number of desirable rentals at an affordable rate for those whose priorities center on avoiding class and looking for trouble. Keep in mind, you’ll be living close to a college campus, so there is some petty crime and noise disturbance that comes along with the youthful idealism. Try to avoid the west side of the Great Miami River. Two bedrooms in this area generally go for $500-600.

Et Cetera

The rest of Hamilton!, unfortunately, is generally considered less-than-desirable. Much of the east side is not well regarded amongst natives, though there is also plenty of suburban development in this region that is safe and affordable. If you’re moving to the eastern portion of Hamilton, examine the neighborhoods and scope your neighbors closely before committing.

Whip out your glasses for the Fine Print

While there may not be as many rental options in Hamilton as in Cincinnati or even Oxford, you can generally find an apartment in town without the aid of a realtor, in 40-60 days. Application fees are cheap (under $30) and deposits are frequently waived or reduced given a satisfactory credit rating or perhaps a dashing smile. Additionally, the high student population means that you won’t have any trouble finding a flexible lease that suits your needs.

We have a highway now!

Well, the good news is that Hamilton! (can’t forget the exclamation point) now has quick and easy access to I-75 via the Butler County Veterans Highway. Many Hamilton! residents also commute to Cincinnati, so the roads can be a bit congested during rush hour. However, traffic doesn’t get truly spotty till you hit the outer belt: allow at least an hour for your commute into Cincinnati. The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority, also called SORTA, provides the city itself with bus service. So, bus lines through downtown Hamilton! will sorta (Ha! I kill me!) get you into Cincinnati, but buses are infrequent and make many stops into the city.

Punctuation is exciting!

So there you have it. Hamilton! has one hell of a history, and though it has perhaps seen better (and more tawdry) days, this place is really making changes and you can’t fault that. Apartments are cheap, the city is growing and Cincinnati is just around the corner. Plus there’s just something about that exclamation point. So get going! Hamilton! awaits.

August 2018 Hamilton Rent Report

Welcome to the August 2018 Hamilton Rent Report. Hamilton rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Hamilton rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the state and nation.

View full Hamilton Rent Report
Rent Report
Hamilton

August 2018 Hamilton Rent Report

Welcome to the August 2018 Hamilton Rent Report. Hamilton rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Hamilton rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the state and nation.

Hamilton rents declined moderately over the past month

Hamilton rents have declined 0.3% over the past month, but are up marginally by 0.7% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Hamilton stand at $660 for a one-bedroom apartment and $870 for a two-bedroom. Hamilton's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 0.8%, as well as the national average of 1.2%.

Rents rising across cities in the Huntington Metro

Throughout the past year, rent increases have been occurring not just in the city of Hamilton, but across the entire metro. Of the largest 10 cities that we have data for in the Hamilton metro, all of them have seen prices rise. Ohio as a whole logged rent growth of 0.8% over the past year. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

  • Looking throughout the metro, Fairfield is the most expensive of all Hamilton metro's major cities, with a median two-bedroom rent of $1,080; of the 10 largest Ohio metro cities that we have data for, all have seen rents rise year-over-year, with Fairfield experiencing the fastest growth (+3.0%).
  • Lakewood, Toledo, and Florence have all experienced year-over-year growth above the state average (2.4%, 2.0%, and 1.9%, respectively).

Hamilton rents more affordable than many large cities nationwide

As rents have increased marginally in Hamilton, large cities nationwide have seen rents grow more quickly. Hamilton is still more affordable than most large cities across the country.

  • Hamilton's median two-bedroom rent of $870 is below the national average of $1,180. Nationwide, rents have grown by 1.2% over the past year compared to the 0.7% rise in Hamilton.
  • While Hamilton's rents rose marginally over the past year, some cities nationwide saw decreases, including Seattle (-2.4%) and Minneapolis (-0.4%).
  • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Hamilton than most large cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $3,090, which is more than three-and-a-half times the price in Hamilton.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.
City Median 1BR price Median 2BR price M/M price change Y/Y price change
Cincinnati $640 $840 -0.2% 1.1%
Hamilton $660 $870 -0.3% 0.7%
Middletown $690 $910 0.1% 0.8%
Fairfield $820 $1,080 0.3% 3.0%
Florence $740 $970 -0.2% 1.9%
Loveland $860 $1,130 -0.2% 0.3%

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.