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Last updated January 20 2021 at 8:28 PM

21,686 Apartments for rent in Houston, TX

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Check out 21,686 verified apartments for rent in Houston, TX with rents starting as low as $450. Some apartments for rent in Houston might offer rent specials. Look out for the
$
rent special icon!
Verified
286 Units Available
Alta West Alabama
3263 W Alabama St
Houston, TX | Greenway - Upper Kirby
Studio
$1,640
690 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,545
748 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,165
1146 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Alta West Alabama is situated at an ideal distance from Houston’s leading business districts. But it’s our location in lush River Oaks, close to the Washington Corridor and Midtown, that will have you yearning to call Alta West Alabama home.
$
Verified
40 Units Available
The Oaks of Timbergrove
1700 Seaspray Ct
Houston, TX | Lazy Brook - Timbergrove
1 Bedroom
$849
727 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,029
982 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,319
1304 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 08:01 PM
Eight roomy floor plans available for conveniently-located apartments. All units come with hardwood floors, dishwasher, fireplace, and walk-in closets. Maintenance on-site. Clubhouse with gym. Well-manicured courtyard with grill. Pets welcome.
$
Verified
42 Units Available
The Heights at 2121
2100 Tannehill Dr
Houston, TX | Lazy Brook - Timbergrove
Studio
$779
502 sqft
1 Bedroom
$809
712 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$979
885 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 08:01 PM
Four saltwater pools for plenty of places to cool off in the summer. On-site pet park. Generous storage throughout every home, with walk-in closets in every floor plan. One mile to I-610.
$
Verified
35 Units Available
Calais Midtown
3210 Louisiana St
Houston, TX | Midtown
1 Bedroom
$1,079
806 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,749
1333 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$2,169
1724 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 08:00 PM
Located close by Theater District, Houston Zoo, The Galleria and more. Just 15 minutes to nearby universities like Rice and University of Houston. Units include full-size washer and dryer, slab granite counters and microwaves.
Verified
34 Units Available
Coles Crossing
12500 Barker Cypress Rd
Houston, TX
1 Bedroom
$949
765 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,259
1126 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,579
1361 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 08:00 PM
Coles Crossing in Cypress, Texas, offer lovely garden apartments in a park-like setting. Amenities include private balconies, open kitchens, high ceilings and a resort pool on the property.
Verified
24 Units Available
Bala Woods
23200 Forest North Dr
Houston, TX | Kingwood
1 Bedroom
$1,009
840 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,119
1202 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,849
1403 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 08:00 PM
Close to I-69 and Northpark Plaza Drive. Modern apartments with bathtub, fully equipped kitchen and fireplace. Pleasant community includes a pool, business center and 24-hour gym.
Verified
34 Units Available
Sevona Park Row
15335 Park Row
Houston, TX | Energy Corridor
1 Bedroom
$880
863 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,255
1237 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$1,645
1532 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
On Park Row between Memorial Brook and Broadfield, each unit borders on luxurious. Marble countertops, even in bathrooms. Walk-in closets, five-walled bedrooms and three-window living rooms. Grounds include gym, pool, game room, courtyard, playground.
$
Verified
44 Units Available
Alexan River Oaks
3015 Weslayan Street
Houston, TX | Greenway - Upper Kirby
1 Bedroom
$1,698
858 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,625
1167 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Alexan River Oaks is a sophisticated residence neighboring Houston’s desirable River Oaks neighborhood.
Verified
485 Units Available
The Westcott
929 Westcott Street
Houston, TX | Washington Avenue - Memorial Park
1 Bedroom
$2,200
959 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$3,500
1882 sqft
3 Bedrooms
$5,350
2082 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Charm that inspires. Details that delight. Introducing The Westcott, the newest gem coming to Memorial Park. Experience an elevated lifestyle with pampered services such as complimentary valet and 24-hour concierge.
Verified
73 Units Available
The Standard in the Heights
609 Waverly Street
Houston, TX | Greater Heights
Studio
$1,149
561 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,329
728 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,084
1133 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
The Standard is as new, luxury apartment community in The Heights – one of Houston’s most vibrant, ever-changing and creative neighborhoods.
Verified
55 Units Available
The Carlton
3805 W Alabama St
Houston, TX | Greenway - Upper Kirby
1 Bedroom
$1,430
914 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,825
1311 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Nine-foot ceilings and bay windows for open, airy living spaces. Designer lighting fixtures, including track and pendant lighting. Resort-style pool nestled into park-like landscaping. Fast access to I-610 and Southwest Freeway/I-69.
Verified
1 Unit Available
The Life at Timber Ridge
5350 Aeropark Dr
Houston, TX
1 Bedroom
$860
652 sqft
2 Bedrooms
Ask
3 Bedrooms
Ask
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
You’re sure to find the perfect apartment home here at The Life at Timber Ridge, located in Houston, TX. Our community offers a selection of one, two, and three-bedroom floor plans.
$
Verified
77 Units Available
Alta Washington
6400 Washington Avenue
Houston, TX | Washington Avenue - Memorial Park
1 Bedroom
$1,518
747 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,963
1228 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Welcome to Alta Washington, an urban oasis of brand new apartments for rent in the heart of Houston! Our sophisticated pet friendly apartments have a distinctly modern style and unbeatable high-class amenities that take apartment living to a whole
$
Verified
53 Units Available
The Exchange
1250 Leona Street
Houston, TX | Northside Village
Studio
$1,260
589 sqft
1 Bedroom
$1,405
801 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,990
1191 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
The Exchange is a modern industrial retreat with a direct link to the best parts of Houston by way of the nearby Burnett Transit Center train station and easy highway access.
$
Verified
11 Units Available
Augusta Court
1819 Augusta Dr
Houston, TX | Great Uptown
1 Bedroom
$1,150
905 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,500
1350 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Live comfortably inside a newly renovated space at Augusta Court Apartments.
Verified
16 Units Available
Villa Ana
10101 W Sam Houston Pkwy S
Houston, TX | Westwood
1 Bedroom
$634
670 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$796
923 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Find your new apartment at Villa Ana Apartments located in beautiful Houston, Texas. Our community offers one or two apartment homes. Please contact our fabulous Leasing team for more information!
Verified
13 Units Available
Madison Apartments
9701 Forum Park Dr
Houston, TX | Westwood
Studio
Ask
1 Bedroom
$647
787 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$843
1183 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Located in the city of Houston, Texas our charming apartment community is ideal for those seeking the ultimate in comfort and convenience.
Verified
6 Units Available
Ridge Stone Apartments
8710 Fondren Rd
Houston, TX | Braeburn
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$738
945 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Treat yourself to the pleasures of Ridge Stone Apartments…the ideal place to call home. If comfort, convenience, and location are what you desire, then look no further.
Verified
32 Units Available
Circuit
2424 Capitol St
Houston, TX | Downtown Houston
Studio
$925
645 sqft
1 Bedroom
$999
773 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$1,418
1224 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Circuit boasts a vibrant location in the East Downtown neighborhood of Houston, offering spacious floor plans paired with luxurious finishes.
Verified
16 Units Available
Cashel Springs
14222 Wunderlich Dr
Houston, TX
1 Bedroom
$743
684 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$894
976 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Large, luxurious, and fully-furnished apartments come with chic granite countertops, hardwood floors, fireplace, and stainless steel appliances. Pool, playground, and 24-hour gym on-site. Parking available. Cats and dogs welcome.
$
Verified
59 Units Available
Star
1111 Rusk St
Houston, TX | Downtown Houston
1 Bedroom
$1,882
913 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,138
1413 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Within a historic building transformed into downtown Houston's newest high rise apartment community. Amenities include a dog spa, a rooftop terrace and a pool. Interiors feature farmhouse sinks, stainless steel appliances and wine refrigerators.
Verified
4 Units Available
The Life at Brighton Estates
131 Aldine Bender Rd
Houston, TX | Greater Greenspoint
1 Bedroom
Ask
2 Bedrooms
$996
969 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Come home to The Life at Brighton Estates, a senior living community located in Houston, Texas. Choose from our spacious floor plans with one and two-bedroom options that are designed with you in mind.
$
Verified
124 Units Available
Alexan Lower Heights
2770 Summer Street
Houston, TX | Washington Avenue - Memorial Park
1 Bedroom
$1,500
745 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$2,370
1301 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
ALEXAN LOWER HEIGHTS offers a decidedly modern and convenient apartment community. Located south of Houston’s historic Heights neighborhood and just minutes from downtown, you’ll find yourself in the center of almost everything Houston has to offer.
$
Verified
18 Units Available
Oaks of Westchase
2851 Wallingford Dr
Houston, TX | Westchase
1 Bedroom
$693
780 sqft
2 Bedrooms
$916
1129 sqft
Last updated January 20 at 07:40 PM
Luxury units feature beautiful interiors inspired by custom designers. Granite countertops and full amenities. Fireplace and patio. Nearby attractions include the Houston Museum of Natural Science and the Space Center Houston.

Median Rent in Houston

Last updated Dec. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Houston is $897, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,068.
Studio
$820
1 Bed
$897
2 Beds
$1,068
3+ Beds
$1,253
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Find an apartment for rent in Houston, TX


Searching for an apartment for rent in Houston, TX? Look no further! Apartment List will help you find a perfect apartment near you. There are 21,686 available rental units listed on Apartment List in Houston. Click on listings to see photos, floorplans, amenities, prices and availability, and much more!

The median rent in Houston is $820 for a studio, $897 for a one-bedroom apartment, and $1,068 for a two-bedroom apartment. If you are looking for a deal, keep an eye out for a red pulsing icon that indicates rent specials.

Tired of browsing? Take our personalized quiz. You’ll answer a couple of simple questions and we’ll put together a list of Houston apartments that are best for you. We’ll also factor in your commute, budget, and preferred amenities. Looking for a pet-friendly rental, or an apartment with in-unit washer and dryer? No problem, we’ll provide you with apartments that match that criteria.

You can trust ApartmentList.com to help you find your next Houston, TX apartment rental! After all, everyone deserves a home they love.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Frequently Asked Questions
How much is rent in Houston?
In Houston, the median rent is $820 for a studio, $897 for a 1-bedroom, $1,068 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,253 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Houston, check out our monthly Houston Rent Report.
How much is rent in Houston?
In Houston, the median rent is $820 for a studio, $897 for a 1-bedroom, $1,068 for a 2-bedroom, and $1,253 for a 3-bedroom. For more information on rental trends in Houston, check out our monthly Houston Rent Report.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Houston?
You can filter cheap apartments in Houston by price: under $800, under $700, under $600, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a cheap apartment in Houston?
You can filter cheap apartments in Houston by price: under $800, under $700, under $600, or search by apartments that are offering move-in specials.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Houston?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Houston apartments that allow pets.
How can I find a pet-friendly apartment in Houston?
You can use the pet-friendly filter to find Houston apartments that allow pets.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Houston properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How can I tour apartments during the COVID-19 pandemic?
While some Houston properties may not allow visitors at this time, most are open for business by phone or email. Please reach out to them directly for virtual touring options. Additionally, some properties may offer video and 3D tours, which can be found on the listing details page.
How much should I pay for rent in Houston?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Houston.
How much should I pay for rent in Houston?
The answer to this question depends on your household income and a couple of other factors. You can use our Rent Calculator to figure out how much you should spend on rent in Houston.
How can I find off-campus housing in Houston?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Houston. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Community College, University of Houston-Downtown, Rice University, and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
How can I find off-campus housing in Houston?
You can use the off-campus housing filters to find apartments near colleges located in or around Houston. Some of the colleges and universities in the area include Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Community College, University of Houston-Downtown, Rice University, and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Median Rent in Houston

Last updated Dec. 2020
The median rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in Houston is $897, while the median rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,068.
Studio
$820
1 Bed
$897
2 Beds
$1,068
3+ Beds
$1,253

City Guide

Houston
'Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.' (Neil Armstrong)
'Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.' (Neil Armstrong)

When then-President of the Republic of Texas Sam Houston incorporated the City of Houston in 1837, the prevailing industry was railroad construction. A lot has changed since then, but the city’s passion for modes of transportation has not (think NASA and oil tycoons). Too bad a mass transit system consistently fails to inspire our local legislators... So whether you travel via steam engine or shuttle rocket, you’re going to need somewhere to park your vessel in this city of over two million. It doesn’t take a regular Space Camp attendee to find a great apartment in Houston, but we hope this guide furnishes some enlightenment for your odyssey. Happy hunting!

Having trouble with Craigslist Houston? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Apartment Guide? Apartment List is here to help!

Space shuttle at Houston Space Center

Williams Waterwall in Uptown Houston

Ducking around at Hermann Park

Summer in the City

Two must-knows for Houston apartment hunting concern the seasonal implications of 30 degrees latitude.

  • Garage Parking: Summers in Houston are consistently scorching. (This is Big Sky country, after all.) Regardless of what your car seats are made of—leather, cloth, old basketballs signed by Hakeem Olajuwon and the 1995 Rockets—you don’t want to traverse the gates of hell every time you need to drive somewhere. Seeking out that apartment complex with garage parking may save you this minor discomfort and only cost a $50/month more. However, if you can't get garage parking a lot of communities also offer covered parking for no additional charge. 

  • The Pool Scene: Houston is HOT, HOT, HOT. But don't worry, many of the apartments have invested in ways to help their residents stay cool or at least have fun in the heat. Pools at these apartments look more like resort pools than your local YMCA.  You'll find many that have invested in infinity pools and pools with built in lounge chairs (in the water!) or zero entry edges. Make sure to grab your towel and flip-flops. 

Summer in the City
+

Two must-knows for Houston apartment hunting concern the seasonal implications of 30 degrees latitude.

  • Garage Parking: Summers in Houston are consistently scorching. (This is Big Sky country, after all.) Regardless of what your car seats are made of—leather, cloth, old basketballs signed by Hakeem Olajuwon and the 1995 Rockets—you don’t want to traverse the gates of hell every time you need to drive somewhere. Seeking out that apartment complex with garage parking may save you this minor discomfort and only cost a $50/month more. However, if you can't get garage parking a lot of communities also offer covered parking for no additional charge. 

  • The Pool Scene: Houston is HOT, HOT, HOT. But don't worry, many of the apartments have invested in ways to help their residents stay cool or at least have fun in the heat. Pools at these apartments look more like resort pools than your local YMCA.  You'll find many that have invested in infinity pools and pools with built in lounge chairs (in the water!) or zero entry edges. Make sure to grab your towel and flip-flops. 

Inside the Loop

Houstonians who live inside the 610 Loop (“ITL” for your keyword searching convenience), which forms the inner web of commerce including Downtown, the Heights, the area around Rice University, and other such historic neighborhoods, can be notoriously arrogant. In a city where most of the population owns a personal vehicle, this provincialism can seem ridiculous. OTLers (those “outside the Loop”) consistently doubt the existence of good reasons to travel inside 610, claiming their lives are less stressful and just as exciting as ITLers. But there are good reasons to consider living ITL. Namely:

  • Proximity to Downtown, accessible from most points ITL via the newly constructed METRORail. 
  • Memorial Park, the largest urban greenspace in the Houston Metro area, containing a golf course, tennis courts, an aquatics center, and miles of running trails.
  • H.E.B. Central Market on Westheimer is the Mecca for Houston foodies. Sample new cheeses, pick out a specialty wine, and gain access to some of the best local produce at this Midtown gem.
  • Pet Friendliness, access to the outdoors in side the loop is a little more limited than outside the loop.  The savvy apartment communities know renters love their pets and have invested in dog parks and even in building dog washes to attract the pet friendly apartment searcher.  
Inside the Loop
+

Houstonians who live inside the 610 Loop (“ITL” for your keyword searching convenience), which forms the inner web of commerce including Downtown, the Heights, the area around Rice University, and other such historic neighborhoods, can be notoriously arrogant. In a city where most of the population owns a personal vehicle, this provincialism can seem ridiculous. OTLers (those “outside the Loop”) consistently doubt the existence of good reasons to travel inside 610, claiming their lives are less stressful and just as exciting as ITLers. But there are good reasons to consider living ITL. Namely:

  • Proximity to Downtown, accessible from most points ITL via the newly constructed METRORail. 
  • Memorial Park, the largest urban greenspace in the Houston Metro area, containing a golf course, tennis courts, an aquatics center, and miles of running trails.
  • H.E.B. Central Market on Westheimer is the Mecca for Houston foodies. Sample new cheeses, pick out a specialty wine, and gain access to some of the best local produce at this Midtown gem.
  • Pet Friendliness, access to the outdoors in side the loop is a little more limited than outside the loop.  The savvy apartment communities know renters love their pets and have invested in dog parks and even in building dog washes to attract the pet friendly apartment searcher.  
Alright, enough sidestepping. Let’s get to the neighborhoods!

Downtown: Downtown Houston feels extremely corporate and business-like. If you aren’t comfortable seeing oil tycoons in suits hobnob it at Starbucks all day, then this might not be the district for you. Downtown also shuts down around 10pm—there aren’t too many late night or 24-hour spots for you party animals. If you want nightlife, you’ll have to head west to Midtown or Washington. That said, the area affectionately known as EaDo (“East Downtown”) has some wonderful surprises, including some of the best Chinese buffets in town… $550/month for an historic one-bedroom in EaDo. Compare that with studio lofts in the CBD: upwards of $1000/month!

The Eastern Wards: Residential development originally sprawled westward out from Downtown, the originally professional class settling in the Fourth Ward and leaving points east to industrial and shipping uses. That’s not to say there aren’t some decent neighborhoods: University of Houston sits smack in the middle of the Third Ward, which ensures some measure of stability. Don’t pay much over $600/month (utilities included) for a modest-sized two-bedroom condo near U of H. Checking out the Orange Show on Munger St. is a must. 

Midtown: Running west out from Downtown, this is the “it” area for young, artsy, professionals. West Alabama has the historic Angelika Theatre, and Washington Ave. is the new (moneyed) hipster location. This neighborhood still has that urban, commercial feel, but it’s that of a smaller city. Most folks who live here rarely find it necessary to head east of the Gulf Freeway. Seriously, all the culture and amenities one needs can be found on Westheimer St. Don’t go too far past Shepherd or you’ll land in River Oaks, one of the oldest in richest communities in the U.S. Luxury apartments and lofts on Washington go for around $1000/month and typically come with hardwood floors and in-unit washer and dryers,  two bedrooms start at $1500/month. Head south for more reasonable rates: $700-$800/month for one-bedrooms (Jacuzzi included?!) off Montrose.

The Heights: A wonderfully diverse and historic neighborhood (master-planned in 1891, it features Victorian mansions alongside quaint single-family homes), the Heights enjoys great access to major freeways: I-10, which will take you into the CBD or west to Katy; and I-45, which will take you north to the airport or the Woodlands. Professional folks who can’t afford to live in Midtown plus young families give the Heights a laid-back feel. Nicer one-bedroom apartments will top out at $1000/month. Look for a two- or three-bedroom Victorian and you’ll save $200-$300/month per head.

West University: Named for Rice University’s majestic presence, this area boasts an impressive number of museums (concentrated in the aptly named “Museum District”), Hermann Park (the only real rival to Memorial Park), and the Houston Zoo. The driftwood-framed Ginger Man in Rice Village shopping center is arguably the best beer bar in town. Two-bedroom apartments with hardwood floors run $1300/month and up; a little more than half that for only one bedroom. Expect covered parking in this neighborhood. (But if not, don’t fret: there are so many trees you’ll be fine on the street.)

Between 610 and the Beltway: The graphically tubular zone between the Loop and Beltway 8 (also called the Sam Houston Tollway) is the first legitimately “suburban” area after one leaves central Houston. These communities are oftentimes still historic—picture wide, oak-lined streets and large porches—but more spread out. The sacrifice one makes in moving OTL is that city feel: there are definitely highly-trafficked commercial districts (the Galleria in Woodway is a prime example), but they’re more likely to be massive malls amidst a moat of parking possibilities than ye olde main street. Here are a few neighborhoods OTL you’d best be acquainted with. 

Bellaire: Just outside the southwest corner of the Loop, Bellaire lives up to its California namesake. The Galleria shopping center (poodles, Versace, etc.) perches just north of Hwy. 59, South Rice Ave. linking it to Bellaire Blvd. (Wait, what??!)$700-$800/month for one-bedrooms, higher if you’d like to be closer to the Medical Center in case of an emergency.

Memorial: As you travel west along I-10, the communities on either side of the freeway are broken up into independent incorporated “villages”: Bunker Hill, Piney Point, Hunter’s Creek, Hedwig.  The Houston Country Club imparts an appropriate aura to this region. It’s where the “good ol’ boys” reside. $450-$600/month for efficiency one-bedrooms, higher for luxury apartments closer to the Galleria.

Aldine: A good choice if you’re going to be spending most of your weekends (or weekdays, for that matter) at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, which stretches north of the Beltway but is easily accessed from Aldine. This very inexpensive area (you get what you pay for, remember) offers one-bedrooms for $500/month max. Add $100/month for another room.

Alright, enough sidestepping. Let’s get to the neighborhoods!
+

Downtown: Downtown Houston feels extremely corporate and business-like. If you aren’t comfortable seeing oil tycoons in suits hobnob it at Starbucks all day, then this might not be the district for you. Downtown also shuts down around 10pm—there aren’t too many late night or 24-hour spots for you party animals. If you want nightlife, you’ll have to head west to Midtown or Washington. That said, the area affectionately known as EaDo (“East Downtown”) has some wonderful surprises, including some of the best Chinese buffets in town… $550/month for an historic one-bedroom in EaDo. Compare that with studio lofts in the CBD: upwards of $1000/month!

The Eastern Wards: Residential development originally sprawled westward out from Downtown, the originally professional class settling in the Fourth Ward and leaving points east to industrial and shipping uses. That’s not to say there aren’t some decent neighborhoods: University of Houston sits smack in the middle of the Third Ward, which ensures some measure of stability. Don’t pay much over $600/month (utilities included) for a modest-sized two-bedroom condo near U of H. Checking out the Orange Show on Munger St. is a must. 

Midtown: Running west out from Downtown, this is the “it” area for young, artsy, professionals. West Alabama has the historic Angelika Theatre, and Washington Ave. is the new (moneyed) hipster location. This neighborhood still has that urban, commercial feel, but it’s that of a smaller city. Most folks who live here rarely find it necessary to head east of the Gulf Freeway. Seriously, all the culture and amenities one needs can be found on Westheimer St. Don’t go too far past Shepherd or you’ll land in River Oaks, one of the oldest in richest communities in the U.S. Luxury apartments and lofts on Washington go for around $1000/month and typically come with hardwood floors and in-unit washer and dryers,  two bedrooms start at $1500/month. Head south for more reasonable rates: $700-$800/month for one-bedrooms (Jacuzzi included?!) off Montrose.

The Heights: A wonderfully diverse and historic neighborhood (master-planned in 1891, it features Victorian mansions alongside quaint single-family homes), the Heights enjoys great access to major freeways: I-10, which will take you into the CBD or west to Katy; and I-45, which will take you north to the airport or the Woodlands. Professional folks who can’t afford to live in Midtown plus young families give the Heights a laid-back feel. Nicer one-bedroom apartments will top out at $1000/month. Look for a two- or three-bedroom Victorian and you’ll save $200-$300/month per head.

West University: Named for Rice University’s majestic presence, this area boasts an impressive number of museums (concentrated in the aptly named “Museum District”), Hermann Park (the only real rival to Memorial Park), and the Houston Zoo. The driftwood-framed Ginger Man in Rice Village shopping center is arguably the best beer bar in town. Two-bedroom apartments with hardwood floors run $1300/month and up; a little more than half that for only one bedroom. Expect covered parking in this neighborhood. (But if not, don’t fret: there are so many trees you’ll be fine on the street.)

Between 610 and the Beltway: The graphically tubular zone between the Loop and Beltway 8 (also called the Sam Houston Tollway) is the first legitimately “suburban” area after one leaves central Houston. These communities are oftentimes still historic—picture wide, oak-lined streets and large porches—but more spread out. The sacrifice one makes in moving OTL is that city feel: there are definitely highly-trafficked commercial districts (the Galleria in Woodway is a prime example), but they’re more likely to be massive malls amidst a moat of parking possibilities than ye olde main street. Here are a few neighborhoods OTL you’d best be acquainted with. 

Bellaire: Just outside the southwest corner of the Loop, Bellaire lives up to its California namesake. The Galleria shopping center (poodles, Versace, etc.) perches just north of Hwy. 59, South Rice Ave. linking it to Bellaire Blvd. (Wait, what??!)$700-$800/month for one-bedrooms, higher if you’d like to be closer to the Medical Center in case of an emergency.

Memorial: As you travel west along I-10, the communities on either side of the freeway are broken up into independent incorporated “villages”: Bunker Hill, Piney Point, Hunter’s Creek, Hedwig.  The Houston Country Club imparts an appropriate aura to this region. It’s where the “good ol’ boys” reside. $450-$600/month for efficiency one-bedrooms, higher for luxury apartments closer to the Galleria.

Aldine: A good choice if you’re going to be spending most of your weekends (or weekdays, for that matter) at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, which stretches north of the Beltway but is easily accessed from Aldine. This very inexpensive area (you get what you pay for, remember) offers one-bedrooms for $500/month max. Add $100/month for another room.

Read More

City Guide

Houston
'Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.' (Neil Armstrong)
'Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.' (Neil Armstrong)

When then-President of the Republic of Texas Sam Houston incorporated the City of Houston in 1837, the prevailing industry was railroad construction. A lot has changed since then, but the city’s passion for modes of transportation has not (think NASA and oil tycoons). Too bad a mass transit system consistently fails to inspire our local legislators... So whether you travel via steam engine or shuttle rocket, you’re going to need somewhere to park your vessel in this city of over two million. It doesn’t take a regular Space Camp attendee to find a great apartment in Houston, but we hope this guide furnishes some enlightenment for your odyssey. Happy hunting!

Having trouble with Craigslist Houston? Can't find that special apartment for rent on Apartment Finder or Apartment Guide? Apartment List is here to help!

Space shuttle at Houston Space Center

Williams Waterwall in Uptown Houston

Ducking around at Hermann Park

Summer in the City

Two must-knows for Houston apartment hunting concern the seasonal implications of 30 degrees latitude.

  • Garage Parking: Summers in Houston are consistently scorching. (This is Big Sky country, after all.) Regardless of what your car seats are made of—leather, cloth, old basketballs signed by Hakeem Olajuwon and the 1995 Rockets—you don’t want to traverse the gates of hell every time you need to drive somewhere. Seeking out that apartment complex with garage parking may save you this minor discomfort and only cost a $50/month more. However, if you can't get garage parking a lot of communities also offer covered parking for no additional charge. 

  • The Pool Scene: Houston is HOT, HOT, HOT. But don't worry, many of the apartments have invested in ways to help their residents stay cool or at least have fun in the heat. Pools at these apartments look more like resort pools than your local YMCA.  You'll find many that have invested in infinity pools and pools with built in lounge chairs (in the water!) or zero entry edges. Make sure to grab your towel and flip-flops. 

Summer in the City
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Two must-knows for Houston apartment hunting concern the seasonal implications of 30 degrees latitude.

  • Garage Parking: Summers in Houston are consistently scorching. (This is Big Sky country, after all.) Regardless of what your car seats are made of—leather, cloth, old basketballs signed by Hakeem Olajuwon and the 1995 Rockets—you don’t want to traverse the gates of hell every time you need to drive somewhere. Seeking out that apartment complex with garage parking may save you this minor discomfort and only cost a $50/month more. However, if you can't get garage parking a lot of communities also offer covered parking for no additional charge. 

  • The Pool Scene: Houston is HOT, HOT, HOT. But don't worry, many of the apartments have invested in ways to help their residents stay cool or at least have fun in the heat. Pools at these apartments look more like resort pools than your local YMCA.  You'll find many that have invested in infinity pools and pools with built in lounge chairs (in the water!) or zero entry edges. Make sure to grab your towel and flip-flops. 

Inside the Loop

Houstonians who live inside the 610 Loop (“ITL” for your keyword searching convenience), which forms the inner web of commerce including Downtown, the Heights, the area around Rice University, and other such historic neighborhoods, can be notoriously arrogant. In a city where most of the population owns a personal vehicle, this provincialism can seem ridiculous. OTLers (those “outside the Loop”) consistently doubt the existence of good reasons to travel inside 610, claiming their lives are less stressful and just as exciting as ITLers. But there are good reasons to consider living ITL. Namely:

  • Proximity to Downtown, accessible from most points ITL via the newly constructed METRORail. 
  • Memorial Park, the largest urban greenspace in the Houston Metro area, containing a golf course, tennis courts, an aquatics center, and miles of running trails.
  • H.E.B. Central Market on Westheimer is the Mecca for Houston foodies. Sample new cheeses, pick out a specialty wine, and gain access to some of the best local produce at this Midtown gem.
  • Pet Friendliness, access to the outdoors in side the loop is a little more limited than outside the loop.  The savvy apartment communities know renters love their pets and have invested in dog parks and even in building dog washes to attract the pet friendly apartment searcher.  
Inside the Loop
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Houstonians who live inside the 610 Loop (“ITL” for your keyword searching convenience), which forms the inner web of commerce including Downtown, the Heights, the area around Rice University, and other such historic neighborhoods, can be notoriously arrogant. In a city where most of the population owns a personal vehicle, this provincialism can seem ridiculous. OTLers (those “outside the Loop”) consistently doubt the existence of good reasons to travel inside 610, claiming their lives are less stressful and just as exciting as ITLers. But there are good reasons to consider living ITL. Namely:

  • Proximity to Downtown, accessible from most points ITL via the newly constructed METRORail. 
  • Memorial Park, the largest urban greenspace in the Houston Metro area, containing a golf course, tennis courts, an aquatics center, and miles of running trails.
  • H.E.B. Central Market on Westheimer is the Mecca for Houston foodies. Sample new cheeses, pick out a specialty wine, and gain access to some of the best local produce at this Midtown gem.
  • Pet Friendliness, access to the outdoors in side the loop is a little more limited than outside the loop.  The savvy apartment communities know renters love their pets and have invested in dog parks and even in building dog washes to attract the pet friendly apartment searcher.  
Alright, enough sidestepping. Let’s get to the neighborhoods!

Downtown: Downtown Houston feels extremely corporate and business-like. If you aren’t comfortable seeing oil tycoons in suits hobnob it at Starbucks all day, then this might not be the district for you. Downtown also shuts down around 10pm—there aren’t too many late night or 24-hour spots for you party animals. If you want nightlife, you’ll have to head west to Midtown or Washington. That said, the area affectionately known as EaDo (“East Downtown”) has some wonderful surprises, including some of the best Chinese buffets in town… $550/month for an historic one-bedroom in EaDo. Compare that with studio lofts in the CBD: upwards of $1000/month!

The Eastern Wards: Residential development originally sprawled westward out from Downtown, the originally professional class settling in the Fourth Ward and leaving points east to industrial and shipping uses. That’s not to say there aren’t some decent neighborhoods: University of Houston sits smack in the middle of the Third Ward, which ensures some measure of stability. Don’t pay much over $600/month (utilities included) for a modest-sized two-bedroom condo near U of H. Checking out the Orange Show on Munger St. is a must. 

Midtown: Running west out from Downtown, this is the “it” area for young, artsy, professionals. West Alabama has the historic Angelika Theatre, and Washington Ave. is the new (moneyed) hipster location. This neighborhood still has that urban, commercial feel, but it’s that of a smaller city. Most folks who live here rarely find it necessary to head east of the Gulf Freeway. Seriously, all the culture and amenities one needs can be found on Westheimer St. Don’t go too far past Shepherd or you’ll land in River Oaks, one of the oldest in richest communities in the U.S. Luxury apartments and lofts on Washington go for around $1000/month and typically come with hardwood floors and in-unit washer and dryers,  two bedrooms start at $1500/month. Head south for more reasonable rates: $700-$800/month for one-bedrooms (Jacuzzi included?!) off Montrose.

The Heights: A wonderfully diverse and historic neighborhood (master-planned in 1891, it features Victorian mansions alongside quaint single-family homes), the Heights enjoys great access to major freeways: I-10, which will take you into the CBD or west to Katy; and I-45, which will take you north to the airport or the Woodlands. Professional folks who can’t afford to live in Midtown plus young families give the Heights a laid-back feel. Nicer one-bedroom apartments will top out at $1000/month. Look for a two- or three-bedroom Victorian and you’ll save $200-$300/month per head.

West University: Named for Rice University’s majestic presence, this area boasts an impressive number of museums (concentrated in the aptly named “Museum District”), Hermann Park (the only real rival to Memorial Park), and the Houston Zoo. The driftwood-framed Ginger Man in Rice Village shopping center is arguably the best beer bar in town. Two-bedroom apartments with hardwood floors run $1300/month and up; a little more than half that for only one bedroom. Expect covered parking in this neighborhood. (But if not, don’t fret: there are so many trees you’ll be fine on the street.)

Between 610 and the Beltway: The graphically tubular zone between the Loop and Beltway 8 (also called the Sam Houston Tollway) is the first legitimately “suburban” area after one leaves central Houston. These communities are oftentimes still historic—picture wide, oak-lined streets and large porches—but more spread out. The sacrifice one makes in moving OTL is that city feel: there are definitely highly-trafficked commercial districts (the Galleria in Woodway is a prime example), but they’re more likely to be massive malls amidst a moat of parking possibilities than ye olde main street. Here are a few neighborhoods OTL you’d best be acquainted with. 

Bellaire: Just outside the southwest corner of the Loop, Bellaire lives up to its California namesake. The Galleria shopping center (poodles, Versace, etc.) perches just north of Hwy. 59, South Rice Ave. linking it to Bellaire Blvd. (Wait, what??!)$700-$800/month for one-bedrooms, higher if you’d like to be closer to the Medical Center in case of an emergency.

Memorial: As you travel west along I-10, the communities on either side of the freeway are broken up into independent incorporated “villages”: Bunker Hill, Piney Point, Hunter’s Creek, Hedwig.  The Houston Country Club imparts an appropriate aura to this region. It’s where the “good ol’ boys” reside. $450-$600/month for efficiency one-bedrooms, higher for luxury apartments closer to the Galleria.

Aldine: A good choice if you’re going to be spending most of your weekends (or weekdays, for that matter) at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, which stretches north of the Beltway but is easily accessed from Aldine. This very inexpensive area (you get what you pay for, remember) offers one-bedrooms for $500/month max. Add $100/month for another room.

Alright, enough sidestepping. Let’s get to the neighborhoods!
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Downtown: Downtown Houston feels extremely corporate and business-like. If you aren’t comfortable seeing oil tycoons in suits hobnob it at Starbucks all day, then this might not be the district for you. Downtown also shuts down around 10pm—there aren’t too many late night or 24-hour spots for you party animals. If you want nightlife, you’ll have to head west to Midtown or Washington. That said, the area affectionately known as EaDo (“East Downtown”) has some wonderful surprises, including some of the best Chinese buffets in town… $550/month for an historic one-bedroom in EaDo. Compare that with studio lofts in the CBD: upwards of $1000/month!

The Eastern Wards: Residential development originally sprawled westward out from Downtown, the originally professional class settling in the Fourth Ward and leaving points east to industrial and shipping uses. That’s not to say there aren’t some decent neighborhoods: University of Houston sits smack in the middle of the Third Ward, which ensures some measure of stability. Don’t pay much over $600/month (utilities included) for a modest-sized two-bedroom condo near U of H. Checking out the Orange Show on Munger St. is a must. 

Midtown: Running west out from Downtown, this is the “it” area for young, artsy, professionals. West Alabama has the historic Angelika Theatre, and Washington Ave. is the new (moneyed) hipster location. This neighborhood still has that urban, commercial feel, but it’s that of a smaller city. Most folks who live here rarely find it necessary to head east of the Gulf Freeway. Seriously, all the culture and amenities one needs can be found on Westheimer St. Don’t go too far past Shepherd or you’ll land in River Oaks, one of the oldest in richest communities in the U.S. Luxury apartments and lofts on Washington go for around $1000/month and typically come with hardwood floors and in-unit washer and dryers,  two bedrooms start at $1500/month. Head south for more reasonable rates: $700-$800/month for one-bedrooms (Jacuzzi included?!) off Montrose.

The Heights: A wonderfully diverse and historic neighborhood (master-planned in 1891, it features Victorian mansions alongside quaint single-family homes), the Heights enjoys great access to major freeways: I-10, which will take you into the CBD or west to Katy; and I-45, which will take you north to the airport or the Woodlands. Professional folks who can’t afford to live in Midtown plus young families give the Heights a laid-back feel. Nicer one-bedroom apartments will top out at $1000/month. Look for a two- or three-bedroom Victorian and you’ll save $200-$300/month per head.

West University: Named for Rice University’s majestic presence, this area boasts an impressive number of museums (concentrated in the aptly named “Museum District”), Hermann Park (the only real rival to Memorial Park), and the Houston Zoo. The driftwood-framed Ginger Man in Rice Village shopping center is arguably the best beer bar in town. Two-bedroom apartments with hardwood floors run $1300/month and up; a little more than half that for only one bedroom. Expect covered parking in this neighborhood. (But if not, don’t fret: there are so many trees you’ll be fine on the street.)

Between 610 and the Beltway: The graphically tubular zone between the Loop and Beltway 8 (also called the Sam Houston Tollway) is the first legitimately “suburban” area after one leaves central Houston. These communities are oftentimes still historic—picture wide, oak-lined streets and large porches—but more spread out. The sacrifice one makes in moving OTL is that city feel: there are definitely highly-trafficked commercial districts (the Galleria in Woodway is a prime example), but they’re more likely to be massive malls amidst a moat of parking possibilities than ye olde main street. Here are a few neighborhoods OTL you’d best be acquainted with. 

Bellaire: Just outside the southwest corner of the Loop, Bellaire lives up to its California namesake. The Galleria shopping center (poodles, Versace, etc.) perches just north of Hwy. 59, South Rice Ave. linking it to Bellaire Blvd. (Wait, what??!)$700-$800/month for one-bedrooms, higher if you’d like to be closer to the Medical Center in case of an emergency.

Memorial: As you travel west along I-10, the communities on either side of the freeway are broken up into independent incorporated “villages”: Bunker Hill, Piney Point, Hunter’s Creek, Hedwig.  The Houston Country Club imparts an appropriate aura to this region. It’s where the “good ol’ boys” reside. $450-$600/month for efficiency one-bedrooms, higher for luxury apartments closer to the Galleria.

Aldine: A good choice if you’re going to be spending most of your weekends (or weekdays, for that matter) at George Bush Intercontinental Airport, which stretches north of the Beltway but is easily accessed from Aldine. This very inexpensive area (you get what you pay for, remember) offers one-bedrooms for $500/month max. Add $100/month for another room.

Rent Report
Houston

January 2021 Houston Rent Report

Welcome to the January 2021 Houston Rent Report. Houston rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Houston rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

Houston rents declined significantly over the past month

Houston rents have declined 0.4% over the past month, and are down significantly by 3.5% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Houston stand at $898 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,068 for a two-bedroom. This is the ninth straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in March. Houston's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -2.1%, as well as the national average of -1.5%.

    Rents rising across the Houston Metro

    While rent prices have decreased in Houston over the past year, the rest of the metro is seeing the opposite trend. Rents have risen in 5 of the largest 10 cities in the Houston metro for which we have data. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

    • Over the past year, Houston proper has seen the biggest rent drop in the metro, with a decline of 3.5%. Median two-bedrooms there cost $1,068, while one-bedrooms go for $898.
    • Rosenberg has seen the fastest rent growth in the metro, with a year-over-year increase of 2.1%. The median two-bedroom there costs $1,064, while one-bedrooms go for $886.
    • Baytown has the least expensive rents in the Houston metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,034; rents were down 0.5% over the past month but remained flat year-over-year.
    • League City has the most expensive rents of the largest cities in the Houston metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,629; rents decreased 0.7% over the past month but were up 1.9% over the past year.

    Houston rents more affordable than many similar cities nationwide

    As rents have fallen significantly in Houston, comparable cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Houston is also more affordable than most other large cities across the country.

    • Texas as a whole has logged -2.1% year-over-year decline, while other cities across the state have seen rents moderately on the rise.
    • Houston's median two-bedroom rent of $1,068 is slightly below the national average of $1,090. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.5% over the past year compared to the 3.5% decline in Houston.
    • While rents in Houston fell significantly over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Memphis (+6.9%) and Phoenix (+4.2%).
    • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Houston than most similar cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,305, which is more than twice the price in Houston.

    For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

    City
    Median 1BR Rent
    Median 2BR Rent
    M/M Rent Growth
    Y/Y Rent Growth
    Houston
    $900
    $1,070
    -0.4%
    -3.5%
    Pasadena
    $830
    $1,050
    0.3%
    1.4%
    Pearland
    $1,320
    $1,560
    0
    0.7%
    League City
    $1,280
    $1,630
    -0.7%
    1.9%
    Sugar Land
    $1,180
    $1,500
    -1.2%
    -2.3%
    Baytown
    $820
    $1,030
    -0.5%
    0
    Conroe
    $1,010
    $1,080
    -0.1%
    -0.6%
    Galveston
    $890
    $1,130
    -1.1%
    -3.5%
    Rosenberg
    $890
    $1,060
    -0.3%
    2.1%
    Tomball
    $940
    $1,170
    -0.1%
    0.4%
    Webster
    $1,060
    $1,280
    0
    -1.3%
    See More

    Methodology - Recent Updates:

    Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

    Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

    Methodology:

    Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

    Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

    Read more about our methodology.

    About Rent Reports:

    Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

    We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

    Read More

    January 2021 Houston Rent Report

    Welcome to the January 2021 Houston Rent Report. Houston rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Houston rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

    View full Rent Report

    January 2021 Houston Rent Report

    Welcome to the January 2021 Houston Rent Report. Houston rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Houston rental market, including comparisons to cities throughout the metro, state, and nation.

    Houston rents declined significantly over the past month

    Houston rents have declined 0.4% over the past month, and are down significantly by 3.5% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Houston stand at $898 for a one-bedroom apartment and $1,068 for a two-bedroom. This is the ninth straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in March. Houston's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of -2.1%, as well as the national average of -1.5%.

      Rents rising across the Houston Metro

      While rent prices have decreased in Houston over the past year, the rest of the metro is seeing the opposite trend. Rents have risen in 5 of the largest 10 cities in the Houston metro for which we have data. Here's a look at how rents compare across some of the largest cities in the metro.

      • Over the past year, Houston proper has seen the biggest rent drop in the metro, with a decline of 3.5%. Median two-bedrooms there cost $1,068, while one-bedrooms go for $898.
      • Rosenberg has seen the fastest rent growth in the metro, with a year-over-year increase of 2.1%. The median two-bedroom there costs $1,064, while one-bedrooms go for $886.
      • Baytown has the least expensive rents in the Houston metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,034; rents were down 0.5% over the past month but remained flat year-over-year.
      • League City has the most expensive rents of the largest cities in the Houston metro, with a two-bedroom median of $1,629; rents decreased 0.7% over the past month but were up 1.9% over the past year.

      Houston rents more affordable than many similar cities nationwide

      As rents have fallen significantly in Houston, comparable cities nationwide have seen prices increase, in some cases substantially. Houston is also more affordable than most other large cities across the country.

      • Texas as a whole has logged -2.1% year-over-year decline, while other cities across the state have seen rents moderately on the rise.
      • Houston's median two-bedroom rent of $1,068 is slightly below the national average of $1,090. Nationwide, rents have fallen by 1.5% over the past year compared to the 3.5% decline in Houston.
      • While rents in Houston fell significantly over the past year, many cities nationwide saw increases, including Memphis (+6.9%) and Phoenix (+4.2%).
      • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Houston than most similar cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $2,305, which is more than twice the price in Houston.

      For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S.

      City
      Median 1BR Rent
      Median 2BR Rent
      M/M Rent Growth
      Y/Y Rent Growth
      Houston
      $900
      $1,070
      -0.4%
      -3.5%
      Pasadena
      $830
      $1,050
      0.3%
      1.4%
      Pearland
      $1,320
      $1,560
      0
      0.7%
      League City
      $1,280
      $1,630
      -0.7%
      1.9%
      Sugar Land
      $1,180
      $1,500
      -1.2%
      -2.3%
      Baytown
      $820
      $1,030
      -0.5%
      0
      Conroe
      $1,010
      $1,080
      -0.1%
      -0.6%
      Galveston
      $890
      $1,130
      -1.1%
      -3.5%
      Rosenberg
      $890
      $1,060
      -0.3%
      2.1%
      Tomball
      $940
      $1,170
      -0.1%
      0.4%
      Webster
      $1,060
      $1,280
      0
      -1.3%
      See More

      Methodology - Recent Updates:

      Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

      Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post about the methodology on our blog.

      Methodology:

      Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

      Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

      Read more about our methodology.

      About Rent Reports:

      Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

      We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.

      Houston Renter Confidence Survey
      National study of renter’s satisfaction with their cities and states

      Here’s how Houston ranks on:

      B+
      Overall satisfaction
      B-
      Safety and crime rate
      A-
      Jobs and career opportunities
      B
      Recreational activities
      A
      Affordability
      B+
      Quality of schools
      A-
      Social Life
      C
      Weather
      B-
      Commute time
      A
      State and local taxes
      B-
      Public transit
      B+
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Houston’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Houston renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "They gave most categories above average scores."

      Key Findings in Houston include the following:

      • Houston renters gave their city a B+ overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Houston were affordability and state and local taxes, which both received A grades.
      • The areas of concern to Houston renters are weather (C) and public transit (B-).
      • Millennial renters are very satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B+, while renters who are parents are equally satisfied, also scoring the city a B+.
      • Houston earned similar scores compared to other cities in Texas, including Austin (A-), Dallas (B) and San Antonio (A-).
      • Houston did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Los Angeles (C+), Atlanta (B) and Miami (C+).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "Houston is a great place to live! It’s family oriented but also has a booming nightlife that caters to all Houstonians. The traffic, at times, can be a headache, but there is always opportunity for either public transportation or expressways to get around the city." -Jessica
      • "Houston is a nice place to live. There are a lot of opportunities and it’s a great place if you are looking for a change. Transportation ins’t great if you don’t have a car." -Anon.
      • "I love the city because it’s very diverse; so many cultures mix in one place. But I hate that the weather is extremely hot!" -Mauricio
      • "Houston has good growth, great food, and a short winter." -Joe H.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.
      Read More

      Renter Confidence Survey

      Apartment List has released Houston’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Houston renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List...

      View full Houston Renter Survey

      Here’s how Houston ranks on:

      B+
      Overall satisfaction
      B-
      Safety and crime rate
      A-
      Jobs and career opportunities
      B
      Recreational activities
      A
      Affordability
      B+
      Quality of schools
      A-
      Social Life
      C
      Weather
      B-
      Commute time
      A
      State and local taxes
      B-
      Public transit
      B+
      Pet-friendliness

      Overview of Findings

      Apartment List has released Houston’s results from the third annual Apartment List Renter Satisfaction Survey. This survey, which drew on responses from over 45,000 renters nationwide, provides insight on what states and cities must do to meet the needs of the country’s 111 million renters.

      "Houston renters expressed general satisfaction with the city overall," according to Apartment List. "They gave most categories above average scores."

      Key Findings in Houston include the following:

      • Houston renters gave their city a B+ overall.
      • The highest-rated categories for Houston were affordability and state and local taxes, which both received A grades.
      • The areas of concern to Houston renters are weather (C) and public transit (B-).
      • Millennial renters are very satisfied with their city, giving it an overall rating of B+, while renters who are parents are equally satisfied, also scoring the city a B+.
      • Houston earned similar scores compared to other cities in Texas, including Austin (A-), Dallas (B) and San Antonio (A-).
      • Houston did relatively well compared to similar cities nationwide, including Los Angeles (C+), Atlanta (B) and Miami (C+).
      • The top rated cities nationwide for renter satisfaction include Scottsdale, AZ, Irvine, CA, Boulder, CO and Ann Arbor, MI. The lowest rated cities include Tallahassee, FL, Stockton, CA, Dayton, OH, Detroit, MI and Newark, NJ.

      Renters say:

      • "Houston is a great place to live! It’s family oriented but also has a booming nightlife that caters to all Houstonians. The traffic, at times, can be a headache, but there is always opportunity for either public transportation or expressways to get around the city." -Jessica
      • "Houston is a nice place to live. There are a lot of opportunities and it’s a great place if you are looking for a change. Transportation ins’t great if you don’t have a car." -Anon.
      • "I love the city because it’s very diverse; so many cultures mix in one place. But I hate that the weather is extremely hot!" -Mauricio
      • "Houston has good growth, great food, and a short winter." -Joe H.

      For more information on the survey methodology and findings or to speak to one of our researchers, please contact our team at rentonomics@apartmentlist.com.

      View our national survey results here.