84 Apartments for rent in Madison, WI

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Last updated November 22 at 12:24am UTC
535 W Johnson St
Capitol
Madison, WI
Updated November 21 at 2:17am UTC
4 Bedrooms
Ask
2605 University Ave
Regent
Madison, WI
Updated November 13 at 2:14am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$999
6731 Schroeder Rd 4
Madison
Madison, WI
Updated November 8 at 11:31am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$980
333 W Mifflin Street
Capitol
Madison, WI
Updated November 2 at 3:06am UTC
1 Bedroom
$1,475
2970 Cimarron Trail
Madison
Madison, WI
Updated November 16 at 12:39pm UTC
2 Bedrooms
$949
2936 Turbot Dr
Madison
Madison, WI
Updated November 16 at 12:36pm UTC
2 Bedrooms
$899
33 Lathrop St.
Regent
Madison, WI
Updated November 16 at 12:06pm UTC
8 Bedrooms
$5,995
745 E Johnson St
Tenney-Lapham
Madison, WI
Updated November 21 at 2:17am UTC
4 Bedrooms
$2,600
N Midvale Blvd
Madison
Madison, WI
Updated November 17 at 1:37am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$1,790
4250 University Ave
Madison
Madison, WI
Updated November 17 at 1:37am UTC
2 Bedrooms
$1,910
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City Guide
Madison
Renting in Madison

Taking an approach that borders on being almost too nice, Madtown’s rental scene (stocked with an abundance of affordable houses, apartments and shared living spaces for the college set) is run by agents—not apartment brokers—that operate with a focus on quality service. They make finding a sweet apartment so easy it makes Sunday mornings seem stressful.

More than a Score: A good credit score is as important as a financial consistency. Unlike many other cities, many rental agents and property management companies look at your payment patterns when they run your background check in order to get a sense of your financial behavior—not just your overall credit score.

References Matter: Not only will many landlords and property managers call your previous landlords, they’ll also call your employers to verify income (an offer letter is accepted for people moving to the area for a new job).

Sort of Totally Ideal: Application fees (around $50) are often returned if you’re declined. If you’re accepted, this fee will be put towards your first month’s rent. That’s basically the most awesome deal ever created since man started charging man for temporary inhabitance.

Location, Location, Location

Carved into an hourglass by Lake Mendota and Lake Monona—with Downtown running between them—the city’s East and West Sides are home to the majority of the student population and residential areas (not to mention significantly less traffic than Downtown).

East Side: Hip graduate students that migrate away from the University (particularly in Atwood/Willy) have made this area the hotspot for boutique shopping, co-ops, and an arty but easy-going bar scene. Expect: cute bungalows, lots of shared housing and a sprinkling of young families.

West Side: Home of the University of Wisconsin—Madison, the Westside is where all things college-related, like indie music venues, coffee shops, used book stores and co-eds, flourish. Overall the housing is—appropriately—geared toward students, so expect the associated shabbiness/ruckus. If you’re young, enjoy beer pong and/or don’t mind living with numerous other people inexpensively, call this side of Mad City your own. And whatever you do, make sure to check out the pocket of quirk that is Monroe (you can thank us for the tip later).

Isthmus/Downtown: Downtown, which looks homey yet cosmopolitan when viewed from across the lakes, is urban Madison. More crowded, stacked with modern condos featuring shimmering water views, sleek restaurants and a non-beer-centric nightlife help separate it from the rest of the city: this is where the grown-ups come to play and live. But since we’re in ma and pa country, even on this reed-thin slice of metropolitan glitz you can find plenty of dive bars, family-run eateries and the errant UW reveler.

The Minutiae of Madison

These details are the buttercream frosting on your insider-knowledge cake: enjoy responsibly.

The Seasons: You’ll hear this joke a lot in our town: “Madison has two seasons: winter and road construction.” And both of these “seasons” mean more traffic for you.

  • Well, road conditions are bad in a city you can’t entirely plow after a foot of overnight snowfall. It’s also hard to drive on ice. What can we say? The winters are cray-cray. We hope you like your shovel. Remember your chains. Salt your sidewalks. Don’t risk a wreck if you’re not absolutely positive you’re an ace in the frosty weather and good luck.
  • The two main drags through Downtown (East Johnson and Gorham) are both two-lane one-ways (running in opposite directions) and a nightmare during peak traffic hours (avoid!). The good news is you can take I-151 thru downtown to get from the East to West side (recommended). The bad news is they’re being resurfaced in 2014 (yay?). The so-so news is that they might be expanded into two-ways (we’ll see).

Convert Four Wheels to Two: You can blame the yucky road congestion, or the fact that the scenery is bonkers-beautiful EVERYWHERE, or the flat expanses, or the liberal atmosphere, but for whatever reason, Madison is a biker’s paradise with an inexhaustible number of trails. Join the movement to make friends, fit in, go green and get some exercise.

And remember: go Badgers!

Rent Report
Madison

November 2017 Madison Rent Report

Welcome to the November 2017 Madison Rent Report. Madison rents declined over the past month. In this report, we'll evaluate trends in the Madison rental market, including comparisons to similar cities nationwide.

Madison rents declined significantly over the past month

Madison rents have declined 0.5% over the past month, but have increased slightly by 1.2% in comparison to the same time last year. Currently, median rents in Madison stand at $820 for a one-bedroom apartment and $990 for a two-bedroom. This is the second straight month that the city has seen rent decreases after an increase in August. Madison's year-over-year rent growth lags the state average of 1.3%, as well as the national average of 2.7%.

Madison rents more affordable than many large cities nationwide

As rents have increased slightly in Madison, large cities nationwide have seen rents grow more quickly. Madison is still more affordable than most large cities across the country.

  • Madison's median two-bedroom rent of $990 is below the national average of $1,160. Nationwide, rents have grown by 2.7% over the past year compared to the 1.2% increase in Madison.
  • While Madison's rents rose slightly over the past year, many cities nationwide saw more substantial increases, including Seattle (+4.2%), Phoenix (+4.1%), and Dallas (+2.6%).
  • Renters will find more reasonable prices in Madison than most large cities. For example, San Francisco has a median 2BR rent of $3,070, which is more than three times the price in Madison.

For more information check out our national report. You can also access our full data for cities and counties across the U.S. at this link.

Methodology - Recent Updates:

Data from private listing sites, including our own, tends to skew toward luxury apartments, which introduces sample bias when estimates are calculated directly from these listings. To address these limitations, we’ve recently made major updates to our methodology, which we believe have greatly improved the accuracy and reliability of our estimates.

Read more about our new methodology below, or see a more detailed post here.

Methodology:

Apartment List is committed to making our rent estimates the best and most accurate available. To do this, we start with reliable median rent statistics from the Census Bureau, then extrapolate them forward to the current month using a growth rate calculated from our listing data. In doing so, we use a same-unit analysis similar to Case-Shiller’s approach, comparing only units that are available across both time periods to provide an accurate picture of rent growth in cities across the country.

Our approach corrects for the sample bias inherent in other private sources, producing results that are much closer to statistics published by the Census Bureau and HUD. Our methodology also allows us to construct a picture of rent growth over an extended period of time, with estimates that are updated each month.

Read more about our methodology here.

About Rent Reports:

Apartment List publishes monthly reports on rental trends for hundreds of cities across the U.S. We intend these reports to be a source of reliable information that help renters and policymakers make sound decisions, and we invest significant time and effort in gathering and analyzing rent data. Our work is covered regularly by journalists across the country.

We are continuously working to improve our methodology and data, with the goal of providing renters with the information that they need to make the best decisions.